Gruler Nation Podcast

Episode #22: Seeds to Inspire with Jessica Smothermon and Jacque Salomon

July 17, 2019 Robert F. Gruler Jr., Esq.
Gruler Nation Podcast
Episode #22: Seeds to Inspire with Jessica Smothermon and Jacque Salomon
Show Notes Transcript

Seeds To Inspire 501(c)(3) is part of a large and enthusiastic grass-roots social justice educational movement. Our mission is to support the underserved and marginalized by sharing the knowledge, resources, and awareness needed to restore health and resiliency within self, community, and the planet.

Co-Founder

Jessica Smothermon is Director of Operations with Cleantech Open. She also is the Senior Advisor of Human Capital Management for the smallMatters Institute. Jessica served as the Governor's Liaison for two Arizona governors to the US Census Bureau and the Bureau of Labor Statistics. She directed Arizona's 2010 census campaign, staffed the Arizona Data Estimates and Projections Taskforce, and oversaw the development of the state's population estimates, forecasts, and labor statistics. With Apollo Education Group she worked as Director of Strategic Partnerships in External Affairs working with nonprofits in STEM. She previously served on Cleantech Open's Board of Director's. Jessica has a BS from New York University Stern School of Business in both Economics and International Business. Her master's degree is in industrial/organizational psychology.

Jessica released her first cookbook, Plant-Based Kitchen Adventures in 2014. Another one is in the works!

Co-Founder

Jacque Salomon is a mother of three sons. Her twin sons have been her greatest and most humble teachers. Her eldest son transitioned into formlessness becoming the guiding light in her evolution. Her other roles include wife, sister, aunt, friend, student, writer, and Quantum activist. She was a parent leader with the ACLU of Arizona’s Demand To Learn campaign and is a World Peace Diet Facilitator. Jacque received the Plant-Based Nutrition Certificate from the T. Colin Campbell Center for Nutrition Studies and is a Certified HNLP Coach Level 1. In July 2019 she will also be a Certified and Licensed Coach in Dr. Shefali Tsabary’s Conscious Parenting Method. She has studied under the tutelage of Mystic and Wisdom Teacher Thomas Hubl and has the honor and privilege of working closely with her mentor, teacher, hero, and friend Dr. Sailesh Rao, PhD. Jacque’s work has always been about the children…of all ages. Her call is to alleviate suffering by helping to heal the gaping wounds of scared, frustrated, angry, and confused inner children festering within every person. She believes the plague of this era is the oppression of consciousness; manifesting in the illusion of Separation and the delusion of “OTHER.”

#grulernation #podcast #children #phoenix #arizona #childadvocacy #seedstoinspire #families #children #nonprofit #healing #consciousparenting #socialjustice #awareness #grassroots #childrights #education #planetaryhealth #community #501c3 #seedstoinspireaz

The Gruler Nation Podcast is a show that focuses on conversations with interesting "Level 10" people passionate about changing the world with their work, relationships and ideas. The show is hosted by Robert Gruler, an attorney and founding partner of the R&R Law Group, a criminal defense law firm based in Scottsdale, Arizona focused on helping good people charged with crimes move forward with their lives.  

 Interested in being on the show? Email Robert directly at [email protected] or visit www.robgruler.com for more information. 

Support the show (https://www.ericshouse.org/donate/)

Speaker 1:

[inaudible] .

Speaker 2:

This is episode number 22 of the griller nation podcast. My name is Robert Ruler. I'm joined today by Jessica Smotherman and Jackie Solomon Salomon, who are founders of a newer nonprofit in Arizona. It's a five oh one c three organizations , seeds to inspire. Welcome to you both. Hi. Hi. Thank you for having us. Thanks for being here. So let's start at the top. So tell me a little bit about seeds to inspire. So I know you've got a lot of ambition here. It's a big project to start a five oh one C3 . So why don't we start kind of at the very beginning. What's the, what's the mission behind seeds to inspire?

Speaker 3:

Okay. Do want me to take that one? Okay. Um, see , to inspire really started from this need to understand all of the experiences I had being a woman of color growing up in the projects of New York City, attending public school and all of the social injustices that seem to hamper all of the progress that I tried to make in my life. And I went through a lot of struggles. I went through a lot of trauma. Um , to get to the point where we are right now. I've lost a child at 11 years old , um, due to pharmaceuticals, my children learn differently. So I had a four year battle with the Arizona State , um, Arizona State education department, all the way up to the United States Department of Office of civil rights because my children were denied services for learning differently. Um, it was really in that battle where I realized that with the resources that we had, that we were blessed in order to have advocates and attorneys, that there was something very wrong with the education system where children that are black and brown communities and learn differently, we're just kind of being dismissed. And so I, after we battled and we won that and my children were placed in a school, a private school, and they started to flourish. Yeah. Then it kind of enraged me that we had to go through all that and with all the resources that we were blessed with, that there were children out there in our communities where I grew up that would never have the opportunity to attend a school like my children. And that just seems so unfair because I really believe that my children were not different than any other child, that they weren't any more deserving. And so those, the injustice was just eating me alive. At the same time, we transitioned our lifestyles to a Vegan lifestyle, more compassionate lifestyle, and we experienced healing , um , within ourselves. We as a family of four, we lost 300 pounds in a year. Wow . We reverse diseases. Um, so all these changes and all this awareness to all the sciences and resources where like where was this when I was growing up, had I known this, I wouldn't have experienced such and such and such and such. So when I joined the Vegan community and I met Jessica and we became very close friends right away we send Vegan community yes. To being a community here in Arizona Cause we in 2016. Okay. And so that's how you two met? Yes. Yeah . And it was in that sharing of the story is that we seem like a lot of our passions were aligned. Yeah. And she's so skilled and so knowledgeable in what she does. Is she kind of gifted to me and said, let's do something with this. We can start our own school, we can do this. And that's basically where it started. It was I needed to gift to my community here in Arizona. All of the things that I had learned so that I can heal and I can become a better person and helped children.

Speaker 2:

Right? So it's a road that you've been on, you've traveled that road and so you've learned a lot and now you want to give that back to help those underserved communities.

Speaker 4:

And so my approach of perspective is almost the opposite where she was very much on the inside of it. I was on the outside of it. So I saw the struggles from my work as a teacher in very rural Florida k area. And then also from working with the US Census Bureau for a 2010 census here in the state and all of the struggles and realizing that we had a large population in here that just aren't being counted, aren't being included, and we're not being able to provide them the services that they need. Um, because of the way the system is currently built.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. So that does sound a little bit opposite. So, so jack , so w which is, which is a great thing, I mean, yeah, so, and , and I could be totally interpreting this incorrectly, but from Jackie, I kind of, my thought was when you were explaining that, that it wasn't necessarily a, it was a resource problem, but it was more of a , uh , awareness or education or access problem. Yes. And Jessica, from your position, it's more of a resource problem or, or there's , there's a , there's a part of the community that is not being counted. And so some of those resources aren't being held .

Speaker 4:

Yeah . So that , and that's just a tiny portion of it. But really we were talking about it earlier today, that having capacity to make change requires , um, a lot of strength and the knowledge of what to do and then being able to execute on it. And if your entire life is just meeting the basic needs, you don't have room to grow and, and make your life better in meaningful.

Speaker 3:

Right. And we were just talking about exactly that this morning when we were discussing about like, I'm still with my own family experiencing, there's so much oppression in a so much burning, just trying to make sure you have rent, just trying to make sure you have your car payment. You know, just making sure that you can keep your job and, and the things that you have to sacrifice of yourself and you have to deny yourself and shrink in order to make sure that you keep that job. So it's this constant fear and this constant scarcity that people are not allowed the ability to expand themselves and their awareness to expand their consciousness and to expend a compassion. So how can I be compassionate with the guide on the street where I don't know if I'm going to be able to get my kid antibiotics for the ear infection? So it's that kind of oppression that keeps everyone so stifled and we are greater than, and we're more than that. And when we give ourselves the opportunity to expand ourselves, that's where communities are built and healing occurs. Yeah. And I think that's okay .

Speaker 2:

I think unarguably true, right? I mean if you, if you're worried about where your next meal is coming from or if your car is going to start the next day or if your electricity is going to be off when you come home, it's very difficult for you to come up with a creative idea or to go solve somebody else's problem or see how you can contribute to the rest of the world. So how so? Okay. So that's where you guys came from. So how does seeds to inspire, what's the vision on, on how you're going to deliver on that, that goal?

Speaker 3:

You want to take that one ? Yeah , it's a big question. Yeah , it's a really big question and I'm not trying to put you on the spot here, but no, no, it's a great question. So we're really looking at it in a couple of different ways and the grassroots approach is what we've been doing for the last year. That will inevitably be how we continue because that connects more with the community that we're trying to help rather than coming down from on high, you know, we need to be hand in hand. Yeah. All on the same, same level, save way more . So I think it's about proximity and allyship and understanding that, especially in my experience, it's our black and brown communities that are struggling the most. And with all the changes that are happening societal wise , culture wise and environmentally, it's our black and brown communities because they're kept in this, this scarcity and this does , um, just this lack of ability to care about anything more than just the basic essentials that they're the ones that are gonna suffer the most. So we really feel that we get on the ground and we meet them where they are and we come to them with the resources as an invitation to say, we're not here to fix. We're here to help. We have resources you may not be aware of. Let's show you a movie. Let's bring a speaker, let's, let's help the children because we don't see anyone else as we're all the same. But we're just all very unique. And I believe that we go in with our own unique talents and invite their unique talents. I think that's in the mixture and it's space in between is where the healing is going to happen. So we bring resources. We just had our screening, what we screened , the invisible Vegan and that was to bring the awareness of health and culture and our food choices and the impact to us, to the community. So we did it at the library, we did it where they are, we invited them, we gave samples of food. So really is about building community and maintaining community and opening conversations in a comfortable space to talk about things that are , may not be that comfortable to discuss. And really everything starts with a discussion.

Speaker 4:

Yes. And we really try to incorporate that into all of the projects that we do so that we can learn both ways.

Speaker 2:

So, so the goal is to, is to sort of focus on children. Yes. Predominantly, that's where, that's where you both are seeing that your ability to cause the most impact. I mean it's totally cliche, but the children are there .

Speaker 3:

Sure. Right. And they are the ones that are going to save us. Yeah . And you know, and I have found as as as a conscious parenting coach there people will do for their children what they will not do for themselves. And one of my , my co coaches, she just rides on that and that is her strong belief and I believe her is truly is what we won't do for ourselves. We'll do for our children. So in creating a space where children can grow and evolve naturally and are kept intact as beautiful and creative creatures as they are, then we need to help educate the culture, right. The medium that these children are being raised in. And that's our piece of the education component is to create that awareness and that education piece so that the children then can manifest their own lives within that space of nurturing and health. Yeah .

Speaker 4:

So really children also because they're just open and authentic, much more so than we can ever be at our age and have , haven't been through the educational system. Right. Um, and so that's really where we're looking to change. And so we've talked a little bit about how we do, you know , screenings and events like that, but we also are doing workshops that are , um , thematic around important discussion topics around , uh , climate healing, around conscious parenting, around this concept of white fragility. And then we're also working on building out a school that very much encompasses all of those things in those concepts so that children can stay children from much longer and develop the skill sets they need to really be problem solvers rather than just going to a job that they do just to get a paycheck. Right.

Speaker 2:

Producers. Exactly. Yeah. And you use this language in , in some literature, this, this, this concept of a systematic assault on childhood. Is that sort of what you're talking about there? Absolutely. So, so it's the idea that children, I've never heard that phrase or that that language before. So it's a concept in , correct me if I'm wrong, but it's , it's the concept that children are sort of , uh , unnecessarily having their childhood interrupted or, or what specifically?

Speaker 3:

To me that's the effect. Okay. I think,

Speaker 5:

okay ,

Speaker 3:

there's an assault on consciousness. There's an assault on awareness. There is, there is this, the systemic design to keep us as and not creators. And the best way to do that is to take children, right? In that creativity, we understand how the child's brain develops neurologically, how attachment works, how , um, between the ages of zero and seven, six to seven, how they're very malleable. They're almost had nodded. They're in download, they're in reception, they're creating the neuro networks that are going to carry them into child the rest of childhood and into adulthood. And there is an attack on that, that part of the brain development that then creates the permanent that that child is going to be. And so then we're very malleable after that. So we can understand that children are the most important stage, but we're all children or so many inner children walking around in adult bodies. So many of us have unmet needs. So many of us are acting out which wounds and traumas from childhood. So even when we're adults, we're all still a whole bunch of young wounded scare children, right? So the assault on Tele is to maintain us there because even if we're an adult bodies and we're still children that are scared and fearful and insecure inside, we're malleable. Right? And

Speaker 6:

we recognize that this might potentially sound like a conspiracy theory, but we promise it's, you know , not , there's enough evidence out there. Yeah, I don't think so. I don't think it's ,

Speaker 2:

it's a conspiracy at all. I mean, I think you can see that same concept in, in personal development literature no matter what the spaces . I mean a lot of what you do to develop yourself as a person is to break down a lot of those sort of learned instinct , not instincts, but learned behaviors that have been beaten into you over the years and years and years and years. I went to one, I went to one, a personal development course. It was about speaking from the stage and, and you know , selling things as it was a business development course. It wasn't, you know, anything kind of high level or anything like that, but they had one night where you, you weren't allowed to record anything. You weren't allowed to , uh , take pictures or any of that stuff. It was called outrageous night and everybody had to go on stage and just be outrageous. Like, like look , you would do when you're five, right, you'd have no problem hopping right up on the stage and just go bananas. And it was extremely uncomfortable for everybody in that room to get up there. And you had , you had to wear an outfit and some people were taking their shirts off. And I mean , uh , I did a gang them . Yeah .

Speaker 6:

Yeah. So I had to perform, you had to perform a song and you had to sing and you had to do the whole thing. Yeah .

Speaker 2:

And, and it was a little bit uncomfortable, but it was a kind of about getting back into that primal kind of instinctual self that you are and getting rid of some of that fear and getting rid of some of that kind of , uh, inhibition that we build into our lives. And so,

Speaker 6:

oh yeah. And really there's four prongs to what we think of as the systemic assault on childhood parenting, education, creativity,

Speaker 4:

and um , health. And they are all interconnected and interwoven. Um, without a doubt. And if we talk about health first , um, it can be a challenge to recognize the symptoms of pain in children. Is He really hurting? Um , or am I overreacting? Does she really have a headache? Um, if the doctors can't find anything wrong, you know, we know that pain is highly individualized and a complex experience. Yet when we look at the objective statistics over children in this day and age, we can't deny that we have a problem and that children are in pain. We are now raising kids that will live shorter lives than the three of us. Yeah . Kids today are suffering from what we may jokingly call old age diseases. Um, kids are suffering. We're finding fight fatty tissue in arteries of 10 year olds.

Speaker 3:

Brilliant . Oh yes. I have not been familiar with any of that. Yeah. Well, if I could interject the story with my son, we've reversed a lot of diseases when we, when he transitioned to a Vegan lifestyle, it was a plant based lifestyle for health reasons. And within the year, not only did I lose 120 pounds, but I reversed my hypertension and I reversed my diabetes. I got off on my depression and anxiety medicine. My husband regained 75% of, of , um , brain activity that had been lost due to the fat deposits in his brain. Yeah. My son had basically a hole in his heart that he was being monitored for it and reversed. I mean, he's fine. The , I remember when the doctor told us then he saw it and he's like, this week alone, I did seven surgeries on children to repair this and it's gone. Keep doing what you're doing. That's amazing. So it's, it's, it's, it's this, and my children have ADHD. One of my son has Aspbergers, they have learning disabilities. There are no medication. Yeah. And they're being successful in school. That takes more than just a quick answer of throwing a pill so that they can sit still and learn. It was about making sure that we nurture the environment for their individualized learning style, right . For their brain function, for their processing speed. It is up to us to create the environment for them to flourish is not for us to create a system where they need to accommodate for what we need out of them. And that's the system has been, that's the school, right, to create automatons. And it's not about creativity. It's not about children running around. It's not about their curiosity. It is about children just becoming citizens and being fruitful and producing. And so I'm sorry. So where I was saying it was the disease portion and it's my son , they wanted to put my son at 14 on Stanton's because he had high cholesterol. That's when we transitioned. I was like, I'm done. I can't do this anymore.

Speaker 4:

Yeah. I mean according to the Centers for Disease Control and prevention, they found in the last couple of years that 70% of obese children, at least one cardiovascular risk factor, which things like diabetes , um , cholesterol. Yes , high blood pressure. And another 30% or 30% of those have two or more additional factors. And I mean what age is less than 18 so age between the ages of eight and 17

Speaker 2:

said children. It's true. Right. And , and the answer predominantly is go take a pill. Yeah, absolutely . It's add a bunch of stuff in rather than trying to address the fundamental root problem. Let's have a lifestyle change, right? Let's eat cleaner and give them a better environment. Well, there's no money in QRIS , so there is no money in cures. Yeah.

Speaker 4:

If money's all in sickness and they're maintaining. Exactly right. That's why we don't see marketing campaigns for building a diet full of fruits and vegetables. And this way doctors don't get reimbursed for a nutrition consultation sitting down with, you're talking about stress and lifestyle and how much sleep you're getting and how much do you walk every day . Right . You know , they don't get reimbursed for that.

Speaker 2:

Right. And as much as in as much as I agree with you completely on that and on the, you know, it is, you know, a profit, there's a strong profit motive on that area as well. But people just sort of in our culture and in their lifestyles, they also, it's hard to make a big change like that. It's hard to change your diet. It's hard to, you know, stop eating McDonald's every day and eating and thinking about what you're eating and putting into your body. It's much easier to go , uh, and just pop a pill and think that that's going to cure your problem. It's easier to do that now. Is that , do you get results from that? Not really, but it's still something, you know, we live in a consumer society, like you said, and we have a lot of people who just want instant gratification for Netflix, doesn't load immediately. You're upset about that, you know? And so if your blood pressure's up, I'll pop a pill. I'll be good.

Speaker 4:

Yeah. Well, and you're , I mean, you're 100% right on the cultural aspect of it. I mean, women still are the primary, have the primary responsibility for fielding for feeding children. Yet if you look at employment patterns and family structures, women are now also out of the home much more than they were previously. And families with single mom households have increased. Um, I was looking at some statistics the other day among single mothers, 72% are employed. So there's nobody there to help raise kids and they're raising themselves. Yeah , yeah,

Speaker 2:

yeah. I'm a, I'm a living example of that. I was the oldest of three boys. My mom was single. Mom worked her butt off and my dad wasn't really in the picture. You know, he was doing his thing and we ran through a number of , uh, we call them babysitters, you know, just, just random people that my mom could afford. Some of these were high quality people, some of them were not. The vast majority of were not high quality people

Speaker 3:

and she was doing the best that she could. And , and you know, obviously you feel the effects of the, of, of, of all of that. And not just from even thinking about the food that's going into their mouth , but the conversations that aren't being had at the kitchen table anymore. Exactly. And children suffer from that lack of connection. Children suffer from that lack of guidance. Um, children are going to attach, we are biologically designed to attach to our parents. These are our guides. I'm here on the planet new , who's gonna show me how to live, you know, in this lifetime. And when parents are absent, then children need to attach any to plug in. So they turn to peers and they can only attach one. It's going to be parents and family's gonna be peers. So we almost force parents to be in a position where they're absent and the connection is not there. And of course his children silk laterally. So looking at their peers that are just as underdeveloped and not guided and they formulate how to be in this life. And that's where you get the mcdonalds and you get the staying up late and you get the experimentation is because there's, that's I really, I really believe that the whole family itself, the family structure is , is really a key factor in that because there I don't believe in the hierarchy, which is part of my conscious parenting as like there's, I don't believe in discipline. We don't believe in any of that institutional form of family. We believe in connection and children need and desire connection and when that's not there they're very malleable to like eat whatever or try whatever. And I think moms especially that maternal bond is also under attack. And why is it because it affects the children and how the children respond to that. It essentially goes back to your original point about not having time or resources or energy to be created and that goes into spending time with your kids and you're spending time with your family. If you're working two jobs or three jobs just to pay your rent and keep your electricity on, you don't have that time to then go and nurture your family or, or , or make those connections like you just said. And then the problem with that is that it compounds over the generations. Yes, that's how I was raised. This is how I'm gonna raise my kids and so on and so forth. It just trickles down. And that's how you have the ancestral PTSD and you have the cultural trauma because cycles just perpetuate and they get worse. Because as, as my lesson , my grandmother suffered in Puerto Rico suffered, but she was a good mom and she was connected. But her, the lack of connection affected my mom and how she grew up to be a mother. And then how she, then she mothered me. So I'm a product of growing up in a very toxic narcicisstic household where I was orphaned as an adult when my mom just had no use for me anymore because I was no more supply, wasn't any more indulging. That is coming from a place of just being lost and being burdened and raising five children and having three jobs and never knowing where the next paycheck was

Speaker 6:

coming from. You know, and children are raised thinking, God, I'm not enough. Do you see me? You know, I'm not worth like five minutes and they don't understand. So children have the ability to put everything on themselves. It's my fault, it's my fault. So then you have depression and anxiety starting from those young ages. Right. And we're seeing a lot of that. I mean, I think, I think suicide amongst children, it's one of the leading causes of death or number one or it's number two or there's , there's one particular demographic like white males between 12 and 16 you know, it's like the number one leading cause of death for them or number two or something like that. And I think, I think in large part it's because of that lack of connection. People and people want to blame social media or people want to blame bullying and all that stuff. And I think social media is only doing what it's doing because our kids are crying out for connection, right? Yes. Right. The , the , the fundamental problem is the connection problem. Yes. And being accepted, being seen for who it is they are in this lifetime, who it is that they are born to be. There's so much of a prescription of how we teach our children is supposed to be, there's a lot of shutters and there's a lot of expectations and it is like my teacher says, making our children kind of like this, this black can't displaying canvas that we can paint the life that we should've had. We're going to create the life we should have had and we're going to force it through our children. So, so much of our children like, but what about what I want? What about what I like, what about, and they can never be who they were born to be because they feel the need to fulfill that unmet need of their parents. So, so much of that oppression and that lack of authenticity and that fear of not being accepted for who it is. I am causes drug abuse, alcoholism running away. I mean for children to prefer to live on the street and not know when they're gonna eat and be in danger because my mom, my dad won't love me or accept me for who it is. I am. I mean that is the most painful schism that a young person can go through. And that connects also to this idea of the parenting approach has shifted a lot. Yes, it's now very much a business approach of risk management and you know, everything is overstructured. The childhood that I had, it was different from my parents. And then if you look back even two more generations behind that, completely different, not only from the amount of time that is being spent in doors , which, you know, a lot of reasons for that increased electronics, the emphasis on scheduled activities and achievements , um , concerns about sun exposure. Also the lack of safe spaces to play, right . Um , and all of that outdoor time allows for children to experience the life away from the parents. Um, they can plan, prioritize, negotiate with their own environment without any attached , um, perceptions of what those outcomes should be. No , they can be kids exactly in that there's so much fear in parents to allow children to mess up. Yeah. Have accidents to make bad choices. I mean, our jobs are not to mother our children until old age. Our jobs are to be guides and ushers and , um, tour guides and to give them the tools and the understanding so that they can navigate their own lives and step back, step back. Because that fears your own and your place in that fear on that child. And you're not allowing them to learn their way on this earth and this time because you're so afraid of the what ifs. And so then we take that away from our children and then they have no agency and they feel helpless. And when you're helpless, you're vulnerable to anything.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. There's a, when you were speaking, it made me think of that. That book right there, it's called antifragile and it's the, the kind of, the main premise of that is that the of these three different characteristics of things and , and human beings are one of them. You've got fragile things like a China plate, you know, it's very fragile. If you shake something, it's going to break and you have to be very careful about that. And so when you talk about what is the opposite of something fragile, most people will say, okay, something robust. So something that doesn't break. When you shake it, you take that same China dish, you wrap it up in a bubble wrap, you put it in a nice cage and you know things right? You now you shake it, it's not going to break. So now you just made it robust. But that's not really what the opposite of a fragile is. The opposite of that is this concept that this author goes into a whole book about is what's called antifragile. And that is this idea that anything that's antifragile one , it experiences hardship when it experiences trauma. When it experiences is stuff that w that might break something else, it actually grows stronger. It becomes, it becomes a bigger, better thing as a result of it. And it's essentially exactly what you both just described right there, right? Give your children the opportunity to experience some of those hardships and to go through, you know, you don't, you don't want to kill your child, you don't want to put them in a situation that's going to be too hard that , that that's going to cause longterm harm. But some of those things that you were just talking about, allowing your child some autonomy to go and experience the world so that they can become stronger I think is critically important. And this over kind of parenting, you know about scheduling everything and don't go outside and let me lather you up with 40 sheets of sunscreen and you know, all of that stuff can, can certainly be detrimental.

Speaker 6:

And there it may idea of over parenting and of you know, optimizing children's time through a risk management approach. Sometimes might come off sounding a little bit more of an upper middle class problem, but it really isn't just that, it just manifests in different ways. So , um , in an upper class suburban family, it's about getting the child into an ivy league school while a mom in Philadelphia who didn't go to college, she's behaving that way to get her child to be the first in the family to go to college. And so while the goals are different, the supervision approach is shockingly similar with shockingly similar results. And parents want to fix everything. We're always out there wanting to fix and I had to learn a lot to get out of that myself. So that's why I'm included in the week because we're no different. I've been there. Sure. And we do. We want to fix things. Why? Because we are trying to mitigate our own pain. It's not about the child. Ultimately it winds up being about our needs and what we can handle a weakened tolerate. You know, if my kid goes out and he says he'll be home by midnight and it's 1205, that's it. Freak out, calling, texting, get in the car, searching. And it's not allowing that child to make mistakes without worrying about, well, how is mom going to think? What is my dad? Gonna it's always about other, other, other, and they're always so focused children's so focused on helping the adults that their childhood is just pilfered away.

Speaker 2:

Mm . Yeah. It's, it's, it's an interesting concept to think about. I mean, I think I don't have kids. I don't know. Uh, I would imagine if I were on that road that I would try to educate myself as much as I could. But I also think that there's just sort of a lot of instinctual things, you know, that, that I just assume are right. And I was raised that way. And like we talked about earlier, those traditions are passed down and passed down and passed down. But to think that there is this whole other approach to parenting and what's, what's the official , uh , conscious parenting, right? Was, and you, you're a licensed coach in that, in that sort of fights conscious on parenting coaching. Yes. Yeah . I mean that's a concept that I, I don't, I've never heard about that. I don't even know what that means other than, you know, I guess you want to explain that it's, it's, it really is about raising the parent . It's about helping parents understand that the whatever behaviors are occurring in the house are manifesting in the house ultimately stems from that severance of connection. And we need to stop focusing on behavior and start really focusing on the feelings and the thoughts that are manifesting these behaviors. We always want to fix, we want to fix and we want,

Speaker 6:

we want children that follow rules and follow structure and always accommodating to what the adults need. And is a different to say

Speaker 3:

this not about discipline because discipline is about control and this is about dismissing all control. This is about throwing out all discipline. This is about getting to know your child for who it is they are and raising ourselves and dealing with our own traumas and our own schisms and our own belief patterns and thoughts to listen to the stories that we tell ourselves before we approach our children. Not to be reactive, but to raise ourselves so that we're responsive to the needs of our child and not get lost in the behaviors, but really deeply connect and, and listen to the voice of the pain that's coming through the children. Because children do not naturally act out. Children always want to be best, always want to do well. And when you see behaviors when they're acting out is because they are feeling that disconnection. They are feeling lost. And so they're showing it in the only way they know how. So instead of getting lost in that, say, what is my child showing me? What is my child trying to tell me? What am I missing here? And it really is about focusing on the parent and understanding that we need to meet the children. It's not the other way around.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's processing. Right. [inaudible] I'm processing it because, you know, I understand it on an, on a, on a kind of academic level. I th the issue I think that most people are going to run into is they weren't raised that way. They have one shot with their child, you know, that's, that's it. And I think people will, will default to how they were raised. Most people will stand there and say, I'm not, I'm not that messed up. I'm okay . Right. I , my mom did a fine job. I wasn't, you know, raped and molested or by my uncle or whatever. You know, I've heard all of those horror stories that didn't happen to me. Things are mostly good. And so why don't I follow those same, those same patterns. So to , to to , it's, it's kind of a radical concept. I mean, what you're saying, it's radical to say we're going to, it's going to be more sort of child focused , child centric. I'm going to observe what my problems are, not what the child's problems are, is not how it is today. Right. Everything is, I'm the adult. You do what I say because I said so. And this is what I, this is how I grew up and that's it. If you don't like it, then you're not getting dinner tonight. Stop asking questions. Yeah.

Speaker 3:

Well, because we've institutionalized parent , family and parenting. It's an institution, which is all hierarchy and control. It's all about fitting within the box with any my constraints. And this is the prescription of who you're going to be. So for instance, I'm talking to a young lady who had a typical privileged life. Why is she not happy? Why are you not being your best? You don't understand it. Why? Because you have no voice because you feel no power. You don't feel like you can stand up for yourself and make your own decisions because your anxiety is petrifying you so much to , it's paralyzing you and you can't make decisions. So you just do whatever's easy. You just conform. You just oppress who you are. And then depression starts and anxiety starts. So it's not so much. Well, you got away with not, you know, thank goodness she didn't get molested. Thank goodness you didn't grow up like that. Yeah, let's not focus on that. Let's focus on you. Right? And what happened to you? What are you experiencing? Where are you not showing up in your life? Right? Where are you not being the so joyful, best version of yourself that's, that's the issue. Where are you not showing up for yourself? Where are you not being your own best friend? Right. That's where it manifests.

Speaker 4:

And you see that in the classroom too. When a teacher gives you a creative writing assignment, not only they give you the structure of what the assignment should look like, they give you the title of the assignment. Okay .

Speaker 3:

Are the limit. Yeah. The date and yeah,

Speaker 4:

and if you don't, if you don't give all of that to the child anymore, they freak out. They don't know what to do. Right , right. And you know, that's sort of in a smaller scale, but it really highlights, I think quite clearly and elucidates what Jackie's explaining there

Speaker 3:

and it goes exactly what you were saying about education. I helped a, a mother who was such an amazing advocate for her or for her, her son, her African-American son who was in a classroom experiencing exactly this. And because he pushed back against the assignment and ask questions and couldn't understand why he just couldn't be free. This young man was not only ostracized , he was suspended. Why? Because he asked questions because he pushed back because he didn't understand why I need to follow this structure where I can do it a different way. Right. And so our children are being penalized for their creativity, penalized

Speaker 4:

as adults. We become defensive about it. And wait a minute, why are you telling me how I'm the adult? I'm the older one. I'm the one with the power. Yeah .

Speaker 3:

Well, in that child now he's obviously clearly broken. So he needs to go see a psychiatrist and get hopped up on add pills and let's pump him full of, you know, essentially methamphetamines. Absolutely. And that should, that should cure it rather than taking, I think, a more reasonable approach. Well look , here's the system, because now you're no longer symptom. Now you're not disrupting. Right . They just sit in your hypnotizing nice and quiet and I can get my paycheck and I can do what I have to do. There's no learning. Schools are no longer learning environments. Yeah, they're just producers. Yeah . There's no learning happening in school. There's just indoctrination. Yup . And I'm sorry that's a strong word, but our children are indoctrinated from the moment they're in a high chair from the food choices we give them from the culture. We feed them from the institutions, we feed them, and then we expect them to be quote unquote happy. What does happy, yeah. You know, first of all, to have an expectation as a parent, that child should be happy. Who are you to say that maybe that's not their choice. Maybe in their slot this life they need to do some struggles. Who knows? The Karma we brought into this life with that we'd have to resolve. Our job is to sit there and say, how do I help you be you? How can I show you the rules of this world and help guide you and protect you so that you can continue on your journey to be who you're supposed

Speaker 6:

to be. Right? And in creativity is sometimes kind of a small world word, but really it is a much larger word that also encompasses a lot of these things. And you may not realize this or you'll kind of be surprised to find out that the most popular Ted talk of all time is Uhm , dupes. Schools kill creativity. Yes. And creativity allows not only for the fun of drawing and just basic expression, you know, painting a wall, but exploring ourselves and how we can solve problems on a larger and more influential platform, right. To really help solve some of the issues that we're facing. It's about innovation , right ? Creativity is just a manifestation of inspiration. And if we don't provide kids the space to just be themselves, to just download whatever inspiration comes to them, whatever in their environment may spark some kind of curiosity. They're scientists by nature, they're curious, they're explorers. And that's what's all being stolen from children. And if that doesn't come out, what happens to children implode with the, we are all creators. We are all energy. We are all creators. And when that is stipend, like, like it just rob from children, they do implode and they act out. And is that creativity that needs to be expressed? I mean, if you love playing baseball and all of a sudden you were told that's it for the rest of your life, I just don't like it. You're never going to do it again. A grown man. My husband loves basketball. You take basketball away from him, he's not going to be okay. You know he's not going to be okay. He , he's a coach. He doesn't, he's not no longer playing for a linen . But the love and the passion. Yeah. I mean he'd see, he brings consciousness into coaching. He sees so many solutions on the floor with the interaction. He finds it a very spiritual experience and we're taking that from our kids when they're not. We're not allowing them to play even as adults, we experienced it. So can you imagine children that are ripe and fresh and just arrived here with just an abundance of curiosity and creativity? And we often worry about the wrong things . I play golf and I'm always looking to see what the line is from my Putt, but I can have the line perfectly. But if my flow was off and I strike that ball the wrong way, it doesn't matter how great my line was. You know? There's just, there's more . It's more to it than just a to B to c. Yes. Yeah. That's a good analogy. So we had talked about one of the pillars, which was health.

Speaker 5:

Yeah .

Speaker 6:

Or the other three. Parenting. Parenting. So we're talking, we talk about on that education and creativity and creativity activity. Yeah. Yeah. Which is what the school is ultimately going to be about. It's about encompassing how what we feel are the true solutions

Speaker 3:

to combat this, this assault on children is to create, to create a space where children can really ignite that curiosity and creativity and self direct their own education. We're going not not have teachers, we're not going to have instructors. When a facilitators, when you have people that are going to ask the hard questions, give them the resources and let children bring the answers to us, let them innovate. Let them be curious and find solutions and bring it to us. We're gonna make sure that compassion is, is Ahimsa is the foundation of all is that understanding that we're all connected, the environment is so important and as our black and brown communities that are struggling the most with environmental change, we want to make sure that these children know how the environment works. They're connection , grow their own food, understand the consequences of our health, our food choices that that is the foundation of the school. It really is about compassion and about true education, a learning environment

Speaker 4:

and we were talking earlier about how we've, there are kids out now that are growing up who've never been to a beach or been to the forest and seen animals out in nature. They have no idea and understand the importance of trying to protect all of that and preserve it and how we are all, we're all connected

Speaker 2:

so I'm getting a better idea then of kind of what the, what the big long term goal is. So like say five years from now, right? You guys are humming, this foundation's great people are , are buying into the vision. So the goal is , is essentially kind of a, a more, more , uh , I don't, you know, I want to say formal, but kind of a , uh , a structural system that you have in place where people can come in and, and sort of learn according to the paradigm shift that your bigger kind of advocating here, right? Yeah. Okay.

Speaker 3:

Yes, absolutely. Creating the opportunities for learning. Yeah. That's what we're really about is creating opportunities and invitations for people to come and explore resources that are usually not available to our, you know, our very deserving but underrepresented marginalized communities. So as to bring that education to them and give them the opportunity to choose for themselves so they can make educated decisions. They can make calculated decisions, right. Informed decisions about how they're going to parent about what they're going to eat, about how they live. We can't make proper decisions, healthy decisions when there's not, the knowledge that we really need is not available to us. Yeah .

Speaker 4:

I mean, let's be real. Creativity takes courage. And

Speaker 2:

it does because if you're that nail and you pop up, somebody's gonna smack you back down and get , get in line with everybody else.

Speaker 4:

And in its essence, it's the freshness and the ability to make dreams come to life. And we don't allow for that very much anymore. We judged the dreams, right? We touched the goals

Speaker 6:

based on the prescriptions that we have for life. You know, it doesn't matter that you want to be the best guitar player on the world, you know, is that gonna , you know, is that going to pay anything or you , you know, you have to be a doctor, you have to be an attorney yet like this is, we're constantly telling our children what they're going to do and that creativity piece is what is inside of them seeing . But I don't want to, I want to be this and another layer on top of that. I mean, depending on how much you understand where AI is going , um , we're going to AI ourselves out of, you know, these jobs that you know , we're familiar with. And the only way to get above that is to really be in deep and that creativity.

Speaker 2:

Right. Yeah. And, and I was just talking about this yesterday, you know, there's a, there's a democratic candidate who's running in this next presidential , uh , campaign, who Andrew Yang is his name. Yes. Yeah. And He, his idea is that, yeah, you know, we're going to eventually, I sort of price ourselves out of the labor market because machines and technology and automation will be able to do it better than we are for cheaper. Right. And so one of his big ideas is that he's going to , uh , install a program where everybody's getting a certain amount of money, like a universal basic income type type of situation. Um, and I, you know, I don't have an opinion on that. I don't, I actually, I do have a lot of it .

Speaker 6:

Yeah. I was going to say it's their [inaudible]

Speaker 2:

and you can probably see from my, my eyes, but, but, but I, you know, I don't know if, if you, if I don't know that it's just a resource problem is what I'm getting at. So you can give people a ton of money. You can say, I'll give you 1000 bucks a month, I'll give you 5,000 bucks a month. You can have all of this extra money. You have all the resources in the world. You can take all of that money and never worry about your electricity bill. Never worry about, you know, a mortgage payment. Never worry about any of those things. Are people going to just suddenly become creative artists and problem solvers and contributors to society or People gonna go just lounge on the beach and eat themselves to death or drink themselves to death or sex themselves to death or whatever it is that people do as sort of hedonists .

Speaker 6:

So I've got some thoughts on that. Yeah. Um, first they have been doing small scale experiments. I've heard of them. Yep . Overseas Norway or something. Yes. Yeah, that's right. Yup . Um, but I think the market is wrong because they're giving money to people that are already entrenched in this idea of what we should be doing in filling our time with. Whereas if we're now raising a fresh new generation of open-minded children that they're not connecting and they're not in slaved to the currency, right? Then our whole culture is based on how we, what we consider to be currency

Speaker 3:

and currency. Just how we see money and currency just runs everything. And we were so much about doing, we're so much in the masculine in this, in our culture is so much about the doing, doing, doing, doing and does not enough time visiting on the inside and just being and just understanding the power lies in the being, the power lies and the awareness, the power lies in our expansion. It's not about the doing and we're killing ourselves with the doing are doing is destroying the planet because doing is what you're saying, feeding into hedonism and then feeds into that other and it feeds into hierarchy and then it's entitlement and privilege and so it's the same system. And if we create a currency based on compassion, on service, back to our roots of who we truly are, remember we're souls that entered a body. It's not the other way around. We weren't born and then said , hey soul, we need a soul. You know we are energy living in this lifetime and it is. It is our duty to raise ourselves up and understand really how we function. Really what's going on. Stop by into the illusion that's being fed to us, the system that's being fed to us and understand that we are greater than that. That is the goal of the school is to help children maintain that wisdom that they're born with so that they don't lose it and they don't get entrenched in this system. We want to create children that when they are graduate, they, they're healing the climate because it's the right thing to do. Not because they come out , they can commodify some kind of technology in order. Well , that's what our government is doing. That's why we're not pushing forward with climate healing and the environment. It's because they have to find ways to commodify the results first and that's not what we're about. We're about everyone benefiting. We're about this creativity coming on and flowing and everyone healing. We're not going to just fix anything by staying in the same system. So dishing up more money is not going to help if we people are just as unconscious as just as suffering. You know what they're going to do. They might take that money and go medicate themselves. Like you're saying. I mean, that's not a solution. It is a good start. The concept is right. The price of everything else goes up to compensate. Exactly. Doubles in price now . Yes, exactly. The idea is not without merit. Right? But for it to really be successful, the whole system has to change and that's just one piece of it. Yup . Well , and that's what I think you are doing, right? You're trying to advocate for that fundamental change. And I do, you know , I don't know, and this is obviously your area of expertise and the mission that you're on, but how you transition slow people slowly to break free of the current system and transition into this new way of thinking. I mean, you really have to have a core group of believers and be and have strong leadership, which you both are obviously more than capable of providing to , to, to, to create that momentum to bring people into that system because you're competing with the system. Right . Literally everywhere. Well , and it's interesting now we're in a time

Speaker 6:

where we've got cryptocurrencies really taking off and I don't know if you heard Facebook is Libra. Yup . And so actually we're working with someone who's working on Aquarius. Yes. Which is an idea of a currency based around service rather than , um, you know, dollars and cents and our cake way of, of currency that's hundreds of years old that we're still, that we're still using that does not function for us. It does not work with us. So we are working on this project with him as well. So that's his, he is Dr Silas Rao , who actually was part of the birth of the Internet. Okay . So He's , he's a systems engineer. Cool. And so he understands the, the structures of things and processes and , right . And he's the founder of the nonprofit , um, climate healers that work. So we work very close with him to, to bring about and be his arms and legs have this vision of healing and it is about healing. This is fundamentally about healing and reducing suffering. Like that's what I, that's where I feel I was born to do is I've been able to heal so much of my trauma and my suffering. Now how do I go back and pay that forward? How can I be of service to mitigate suffering? How do I help heal but not fixed? How do I help ignite that natural process of healing with the new? How do I show up where you need me so I can hold your hand and guide you through your life and see where you can find the healing so that you can evolve to your greatest. Because when people evolved to the greatest potential, all of that other nonsense, it's not worth anything. It comes from a place of lack where we're always looking to fill holes, what was looking to achieve because there's an emptiness of this, a vacuum within us. And that's where we come in as to say there's nothing missing. There's nothing empty. It's just not ignited. Let's find that fire within you because all of this is meant to serve you and right now you're serving it. Yeah. It's , uh , it's , it's a situation where you're , you are going to need resources to build all of this out and you've got to get those resources somewhere. And that includes money and capital and fundraising and, and , uh , a lot of that. And then you're sort of asking the system to fund you to build a system to break the system. So I think our primary funders are going to be those that want to also break the system. And yes , we're putting together a proposal right now that we can start taking to some of those key people that , and you know, some of them are going to be a lot of, you know, those 1% areas that realize that, okay, I want a guy rich on the system, but it really isn't helping anybody else. Right. And they're out there. They are. Yeah . I have no doubt about it. So tell me a little bit more about what you've got coming up. What's on the calendar, what are the next steps with cs to inspire? Well, calendar wise , we at the end of the month have our backpack event, which is just filling backpacks for kids, going back to school, that school supplies are ridiculously expensive. I don't remember them ever costing as much. Our teachers are the ones that are burned out of pocket for gap jobs to pay for these things. So we really, what we like to do with seats in spy is really create community gatherings that while we're together and we're socializing and we're loving one another, we're of service. So it's an event, almost like a party to really celebrate children that attend underfunded schools. So we're inviting the community to come eat. We have a DJ come dance, hang out, bring some school supplies, let's create some backpacks. Let's, let's show these kids that we see them, that they're not missed, that we know that has nothing to do with them. And the system is not funding their school. There's nothing wrong with you and you're not broken. We see you. So it's that really that like that fun . The activity of community coming together to do good for others and all of the backpacks are going to go to another nonprofit called lift pure kids. And some of those kids are going to be receiving the backpacks are actually going to come and get to fill their own and help in service to help fill backpacks rather . So yeah . Yes. Awesome. So what, when is that? That is Sunday. July 28th at, yeah. Not too far. I wasn't exactly sure on the podcast was going to go up. So, but yes, it's coming up. And that's at an the venues called soul center in Mesa for 20 West Mahoney. Yes. The address, but you can find the information on our Facebook page. Yeah. And if any of the listeners are not having time to go out and buy school supplies, they can make a donation through our website and we will go buy supplies on their behalf and also have a booth at nights . So July 27th is Zen nights and that's the monthly block party. That's a, it's a Vegan block party in Mesa where we shut down the street and it's just vendors and music and community and hanging out and socializing and there's wares and there's foods and there's treats and there's ice cream and it's just wonderful. So we have a booth there where we kind of talk about our mission and kind of spread awareness. So we'll be there collecting. So people can't make it Saturday, they can come meet us on Friday and drop off their supplies there as well. Sunday they can make it Sunday. I'm sorry. Sunday. Yes. Um, and then also do you want to talk about a perfect compassion cause we're going to be doing screening of that probably in late September, late September, a prayer for compression . So Dr Rao , um , has been executive producer all four documentaries. Okay . Um, and about him climate healers real briefly, but yeah , go for it. Yeah. So , uh, the documentaries are , um, the human experiments and he, they called these, the title of the, the document is they don't want you to see. So it's a human experiment that's really about , um , pollutants and chemicals in the environment and the damage to our health. Then we have Cowspiracy I'm al

Speaker 3:

spirits . Yeah. Cowspiracy I don't know if you know, is that about cows? It's about animal agriculture and the environment. Uh , and it really does highlight and, and uncover the connection between animal agriculture and the environment and brings all the science. And then we have , um, what the health , um, so what the health is huge on that flakes . It was, I think I heard that one. Yeah, that one sounds familiar. Yeah. So , um, his most recent one is a prayer for compassion and that really is about veganism and spirituality and understanding how the core golden rule that underlies all religions is compassion. And it is the him set in his connection and how some of us in our religion justify eating animals based on the doctrine and forget about the true origins of the religion to really understand the true origins of the Linden and the connection and our food choices and how that affects us spiritually. So that's what that's about. We just translated the subtitle into Spanish. So we will be having a screening in Spanish now at the end of September to invite on migrant communities, our Spanish speaking communities to again bring awareness and rating this wisdom of health in a day . The education component. And that's at the end of September. That's September 28th I believe. We're still working on the venue, but that's where we're aiming for that weekend. And we have like when we did with the invisible Vegan, we have , um, we have a panel of experts to come , um, to answer these questions. So we invite the community not just to watch and listen. Okay. I'm sorry, go ahead. You're watching then you'll have, right. So we had a plant based physician. We had , um, yogis and we had fectors rouse speak. We had a wonderful woman named Tasia that she's a social worker and she founded the nonprofit doctors are drug dealers and she's a mom. [inaudible] she would be great to have on the pod . Yeah, she is an amazing, amazing advocate. She's a mom. Um, and she was also there. What we wanted to do was create a mirror so that the communities that we are invited to say we're not here to fix you look this up. This is like where you were from your community. We're doing this every day. This is what we do. How can we help you? How can we show you that this is doable? So we brew, we bring panel that can reflect back to the audience what is capable, what they're capable of doing. I think we're working on getting a Chicano pro like Casa. Yes. To include it in that event as well as some of our local , uh , religious leaders. Yes. So interesting. So , so that's great. So you've got stuff in a couple things. In July and October we have enrolled 2026 that's the big one. Vegan world. So that's in Mesa community college. That's , yeah, that's in what puts the weekend for an October 26 27th yeah. And that is again, that's Dr Raul . That's a climate healers and we're there to bring support him. And it

Speaker 6:

is about creating a Vegan world by 2026 because that is where this, the only way we can prevent year zero year zero being that that is the year where there will be no wildlife left on the planet. All wildlife will be in zoos or captivity or in sanctuaries. That is the projection that we're headed towards. And so we need to, for our children's sake, we need to make radical changes and bring radical awareness to prevent what's the destruction of the planet for these, for our children. And so our mission is to bring this awareness about year 2026 to prevent years zero and it's an international event. We had the first one last year, same weekend, and that really delved into what the issues are. And then all of these groups went off and had been working on potential solutions and identify more of what the microscopic issues are. Not just, you know, when you look at the larger picture. And then this year we're starting the process of developing the tools to approach those issues. So it's every year is building upon the previous year . We're not just, I'm not just talking to you .

Speaker 2:

Yeah. So everybody kind of leaves with some to do list items and they work on it for the year and come back.

Speaker 6:

Yes. And we've had a lot of groups break out. We have people come from South Africa, we have people come from Australia. We have people come from all over the world because we want to create a network of healing that we can go back into our communities and now be facilitators of this healing.

Speaker 2:

Outstanding. Well, you've got a lot coming up. That's a good thing. That's a good thing. You know, if you're not moving the ball forward, you're just being stagnant and, and uh, nothing good comes of it. So where are the best places for people to find you? If they listened to the show, they say, hey, I really like what you're doing. I want to follow you. I want to join. I want to donate where some of the best places for them to do that.

Speaker 6:

They can follow us on Instagram at seeds to inspire [inaudible] . Um, and then you can also find us on Facebook. It seeds to inspire foundation. Yes, yes, Yup . Um , and then our website is seeds to inspire a z.org and from there you can make donations. You can also, there's a contact us option and we get the emails. And those are really exciting because they're full of ideas for collaborating. And yes, this is what we love to do. We don't , we don't need to be the center of any show. No, not at all. Not at all. Not at all. What we really would like is to invite the community that has interest and doesn't know how to talk, doesn't know how to bring this topic to their school, to their study group, to their church, you know, invite us. We have resources. We know how to help you facilitate this change even in your home, your family cooking lessons. I mean, we do, we do it all. Anything that we can do to support you in a shift in your life.

Speaker 2:

Well, you both have a big vision and I'm , I'm very excited for , uh, for you both and to see where you're going and to follow along the journey. I appreciate you both coming and I will wish

Speaker 7:

you the best of luck. Jessica, Jackie, thank you very much. Thanks for having us . Look, the ruler Nation podcast brought to you by the R and r law group, Arizona's premier criminal defense and personal injury law firm [email protected] or give us a call, (480) 400-1355.