Gruler Nation Podcast

Episode #98: Stephanie Taylor from Twisted Yoga Studios

April 17, 2020 Robert F. Gruler Jr., Esq.
Gruler Nation Podcast
Episode #98: Stephanie Taylor from Twisted Yoga Studios
Chapters
Gruler Nation Podcast
Episode #98: Stephanie Taylor from Twisted Yoga Studios
Apr 17, 2020
Robert F. Gruler Jr., Esq.

Stephanie Taylor is the creator and owner of Twisted Yoga Studios. She comes to Tempe with over ten years of experience in fitness and yoga. She is a certified yoga instructor, specializing in Vinyasa, Aerial, and Yin/Restorative yoga. 

 

Stephanie has a refreshing, sensible, holistic, and personalized approach to total health and fitness focusing on working from the inside out.  Her yoga class provides context, knowledge, and support that allow for each student’s experience to deepen naturally. Physically her approach improves stamina, flexibility, balance and strength combined with deep breathing techniques that encourage positive energy flow for a balanced mind and body. Come experience her twisted approach to a healthy lifestyle! 

 

Start your yoga journey with Stephanie by visiting her website at twistedyogastudios.com and be sure to follow her on Instagram @twistedyogastudios  

 

#twistedyoga #yoga #yogastudios #healthylifestyle #health #fitness #holistic #balance #mind #body #yogajourney #grulernation #grulernationpodcast #podcast #localpodcast  

Show Notes Transcript

Stephanie Taylor is the creator and owner of Twisted Yoga Studios. She comes to Tempe with over ten years of experience in fitness and yoga. She is a certified yoga instructor, specializing in Vinyasa, Aerial, and Yin/Restorative yoga. 

 

Stephanie has a refreshing, sensible, holistic, and personalized approach to total health and fitness focusing on working from the inside out.  Her yoga class provides context, knowledge, and support that allow for each student’s experience to deepen naturally. Physically her approach improves stamina, flexibility, balance and strength combined with deep breathing techniques that encourage positive energy flow for a balanced mind and body. Come experience her twisted approach to a healthy lifestyle! 

 

Start your yoga journey with Stephanie by visiting her website at twistedyogastudios.com and be sure to follow her on Instagram @twistedyogastudios  

 

#twistedyoga #yoga #yogastudios #healthylifestyle #health #fitness #holistic #balance #mind #body #yogajourney #grulernation #grulernationpodcast #podcast #localpodcast  

Support the show (https://www.ericshouse.org/donate/)

Speaker 1:

Hey everybody. Welcome to another episode of the griller nation podcast. My name is Robert ruler. I'm excited to introduce to you somebody who is local, somebody who is the creator and the owner of twisted yoga studios. You can see on this screen there a snapshot of some of the things that they do there and she come to the Tempe with over 10 years of experience in fitness

Speaker 2:

yoga. She's a certified yoga instructor specializing in Vinyasa I think is how we say it. We're going to find out Ariel and yin restorative yoga, and she's got interesting stories. She says that yoga has saved her life, so let me introduce you to Stephanie Taylor. Stephanie, thanks for being here with us today.

Speaker 3:

Thank you for having me. I'm excited to be here and, and share a little bit about my story in the studio.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so we've got a lot of obviously stuff to talk about, right? The world is sort of changing right before our eyes. And I definitely do want to get into that, but let's save that for the end because I know I'd like to learn a little bit more about you and the studio and, and really kind of how you got into this. Um, so, so maybe we can start there. Can you just kind of give us an overview of twisted yoga studios and tell me kind of, you know, what you do there, what types of modalities? Because the on the screen that I was showing that you couldn't see, you know, there's somebody hanging upside down, uh, from these things from the ceiling. And so, you know, sometimes that's not traditionally what people think of yoga.

Speaker 3:

No, no, no, not at all. And um, so aerial yoga came into my life almost, almost a decade ago and I'd performed in the aerial arts and I studied that. So a lot of like the circus training and that kind of background. And it's amazing what it does for the body. And I'm also a yoga instructor. So I kind of married the two together and I said, this is what I want to provide to people. There's this feeling of being suspended in the silks and being able to use that as a prompt in order for you to go deeper into your own practice. Um, in a way that we, we support our clients and our students here at the studio. So twisted yoga studios came to be in 2014 is when I originally did my LLC. Now the studio itself didn't happen until 2017 so we are still in kind of our, our beginning years of being in our first studio. So we're in year three right now and it's, um, it's been an amazing, amazing journey.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. And, and so when I was reading sort of a part of your intro, we were talking about Vinyasa and Ariel and yin restorative. Are those separate? I don't know much yoga. I don't practice yoga. Um, I love the idea of yoga, but I just don't know much about it. So are those different, you know, modalities or is there overlap between the two or can you kind of describe, you know, what is going on with those?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, no, absolutely. So one you said Vinyasa perfectly. That's how you say it. And Vinyasa is movement with the breath. So when you think about I'm inhaling and I'm making a move and then I'm exhaling and I'm doing another move and then I'm inhaling again and it's another move. So I always think about like inhales to expand and to open to lift and exhales to fold and dive deeper. So in a Vinyasa you're moving through the breath in the body movement all at the same time. So I tried to teach Vinyasa with at least a four count of a breath. So that's one, two, three, four. Then one, two, three, four. So that's what you're focused on. You're focusing on. I'm coming to the end of my pose at the end of that four. And then I'm coming to out of my pose into the next one, to the end of that count of four.

Speaker 3:

And I'm breathing and it's deep belly breathing that you're doing with that. So you're treating the body. So it's a lot of cardiovascular. Then again, it's all body weight, right? I'm moving with my own body weights. I'm learning how to control that. Um, yin and restorative is more of that place of, I'm going to dive down into the body for a little bit of rest and restoration. So I'm doing, yin is all on the ground seat at movements. It's nothing standing. So it's no power, it's no pushing through. You shouldn't get sweaty in that class whatsoever, but you're helping the body dive down into your connective tissue and your connective tissue is where you make those long lasting changes. So when people come and say, I want more flexibility, okay, well to get more flexibility, you gotta dive down into your connective tissue cause that's where flexibility lives.

Speaker 3:

So I might have to figure out how to hold a pose for three to five minutes and sit with my mind as my mind is going through this process of, Oh no, this hurts. This is too much. I don't want to stretch. Or you know, I'm in that fight or flight mode and back out of it a little bit and let the body actually dropped down into it and start to open up that connective tissue. And that's what the restore part of yoga is too. That's where you use a lot of props and you just let gravity do the work. Right? So I'm not forcing anything to happen. I'm not, I'm not mentally in this place of like get to this pose, get to this pose, get to this pose and it looks like this. I'm actually just allowing my body to settle into it.

Speaker 3:

And one of the philosophies that I stick with is that for every one hour of like a Vinyasa power, a workout or you know, a high kind of energy thing, your body needs at least three hours of that yin, that restorative in order for the benefits to sink. And so you see a lot of people that will, will push themselves to the limits and they forget about that yet. And restorative. So it's a good marriage of the two you need, you need the high intensity with the Vinyasa and then you need that restorative there for your body to have that full kind of complete circle.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's interesting. Yoga has always been something to me that kind of reminds me of like other things that I don't understand, like wine or something, you know, people have these different, there's so many different shoots and flavors and different, you know, creations out there. I, you know, I've heard of like Reiki, I've heard it, you know, you see the traditional yoga, you see hot yoga and you've got all these different, you know, all these different things, which is, it's so exciting. It's interesting. How did you get into that space or how did you settle on these three? I know you said that yoga saved your life. Can you walk us through that story kind of evolution

Speaker 3:

on how you got here? Yeah, no, absolutely. So, and I had a kind of a troubled youth, I would say. So when I was 15, I was out on my own right. So I was financially supporting myself and that's a rough place to be when you're 15. Um, and I, and I didn't, I didn't necessarily know how to navigate all of it. So I was definitely in a very much a survival place of fight or flight and I was just pushing through in order to accomplish things. Um, so during all of that, one of my friend's moms introduced me to yoga. She was like, Hey, why don't you come to one of these classes and it will help you? And I was like, what is yoga going to have to do to help me? You know, like, that's not going to make money for me.

Speaker 3:

That's not going to put food in my mouth. That's not going to give me shelter. So like that's just insane. Um, but I took her up on it anyway. And so I went and I sat down in the yoga class and it was a young class. And so it's again seated postures, slow movement. And I had to drop in, I had to force myself to actually focus on the moment and what was happening and to deal with all of these feelings that were coming up of feeling abandoned and all sorts of fun stuff. And I cried in that class and I'm not a crier. I'm not an emotional person whatsoever. So it was weird to have this like release in there. And the second that that happened, it was like, okay, there's more to life than being in this place of like go, go, go, go.

Speaker 3:

You have to get this done, you have to do all these things. And so I just kept coming back and every single time it was just showing up online, my mat sitting there and sometimes it wasn't even being able to do the full class cause I didn't understand the poses part, you know, of the yoga. But it was more or less like it was an hour where I was completely disconnected from the outside world where I had to drop in and I had to force myself to actually breathe. I had to breathe, I had to be here now and I had to feel what was going on. And for me that's slowed me down and it kept me safe. And so something that even as I, you know, went into adulthood and I got into a place of like, you know, security in my life. It's one of, it's always been a thing that I come back to is that I come back to my mat, I come back to my practice.

Speaker 3:

So anytime I'm in a super, super stressful, chaotic place, you're going to find me sitting on my mat somewhere. And, you know, disconnecting from what's going on out there and getting back into what's going on here. So that's how my, my introduction to yoga began. And then, um, I, I love to do the Vinyasa. I love the power. I love the movement in this, this being able to do these crazy things. Like if you go on to Instagram and you look at all of the, you know, famous yogis that are on there and their ability to do these arm balances and inversions and crazy like adult gymnastics kind of stuff. And in my twenties I was like, yup, this is it. I'm going to push my body to those limits and I'm going to be able to do all of that stuff. And the physical practice began to take over a lot more for me.

Speaker 3:

Um, and, and are the things I've started to return back to now that I'm, I'm a little bit older is, is that that mental practice, right. And the thing I tell my students all the time is that, yes, accomplishing a pose feels great and it looks great and it's like this, yeah, rah moment of, of accomplishment. But really yoga is about the journey, right? And your yoga practice doesn't begin until you finish your physical practice. So you have to exhaust all of your energy through your physical practice, your sauna, and then you lay down for Shavasana. And then that's when yoga begins. So yoga doesn't begin when you walk into the room to take the class, you'll go begins when the class is over and you're laying down on your mat. That's where your mind is settled, your energy as pushed out and that's how your yoga begins. And then you take that out into the world with you. So you always take your yoga off your mat, out into the real world. And that's your mentality, how you're showing up in that mindfulness of being present.

Speaker 2:

It's, it's interesting to hear you go through that because I, you know, like I said, I don't, I don't do yoga. I have done it maybe once or twice in, you know, places where I couldn't avoid doing yoga. So you know, they, they would just basically I couldn't escape and I did it and I really enjoyed it and had a lot of fun with it. But what you were describing sort of, you know, I have those similar experiences doing other things. Like for me it's lifting weights. I like to, you know, to move weights around. It's kind of meditative for me and I find that balance and some of that, that kind of harmony that you're talking about through that practice. But I guess at what point in your life did you recognize that the value of yoga was, was so much it was going to require that you pivot and you make this sort of your mission in life, right? You talked about practice, you talked about developing these skills and sort of balancing all of these different attributes of the practice. But you know, now this is your full time business, right? Or this is your, this is what you, this is what you do, this is your passion. You train other people on this. So how did you, how did you make that transition? Right? When did you know that that was going to be your future?

Speaker 3:

You know, I would say there was never like a point in time where it was like I planned for it. It just kind of happened, right? Um, when I first originally got certified to teach yoga, it was about diving more into my practice than it was to actually teach. Um, and I, I didn't even have a vision of myself being new yoga instructor. It was never like a, a forethought in my mind. It was just I wanted to understand more behind what I was getting in class and why I was having these feelings and, and, and get that on kind of understanding. So I went through the basic 200 hour teacher training program here and learned how to learn a little bit more about the yoga philosophy. Um, and from there I got hooked and so then I went to discover more. So then I went on to different certifications.

Speaker 3:

Then people would start to come up to me and ask me, can you help me? Can you teach me? Can you do these things? And so then I started just volunteering. So my first ever teaching gig, so to speak, with, um, yoga, was actually at a woman's shelter here in Phoenix. And so it was volunteered. I had to go through finger print clearance and everything else and it wasn't paid. It was none of that. And I would go there and I would sit with these women that were in the shelter and we would, we would do yoga. And I would do that a couple of times a week after I'd work my eight to 10 hour day and my normal corporate job. And I would leave that and I would go do this. And I started to, to realize that for me, my mission and my vision and life and what makes me feel the most whole and complete is to serve others.

Speaker 3:

And this is a way that I can serve and that I can give back. And so doing this, in the beginning it was very much a community service type of acts that I was doing. Um, and then from there it progressed. And it was always someone reaching out to me to pull me into it. And the more that I just said yes to these experiences, the more I ended up into this place of like, this is a calling for me. This is something that actually makes sense and that I can serve people and I can do and I can contribute. So after years of just teaching on the side and I was teaching 16 classes and still working a full normal job on top of all of that, and I was doing that a week, um, I got to a place of like, all right, I'm going to make the jump my, my normal corporate job that's, you know, it's, it's nice for the money and it's, it's, you know, a good title and all of that.

Speaker 3:

It's like, okay, let's make this jump and let's see what happens. So I went and I opened up a yoga studio up in Scottsdale and I was their manager. So I was under someone and I helped them build up their studio. And that's when I brought into the, Ariel went to that place and I spent a year within building the studio from the ground up and the second that they were in kind of a good spot and I can train someone else to come and manage. I said, all right, this is, this is why I've been saving money. This is why I've been doing all this other stuff in the background. It's time to do what I want to do and it's to build this. So in 2017 I left them and I came down to Tempe and, and built the studio.

Speaker 2:

That's awesome. What a great story. And that's very, very cool. Our stories somewhat similar to that, you know, you kind of work for somebody else to learn the ropes a little bit, gain some confidence and then you can go and take that on your own. But you know, a lot of people don't ever find something that is sort of their, their calling or what they're passionate about. So the fact that you were able to do that and recognize it and actually take some risk there, it's kind of a scary thing to do. You need, you've got, you know, a full time corporate job to say, yeah, I'm going to go, I'm going to take all the risks. When you were a manager at the other store, they really probably took most of the risk, right? I mean, if the store fails, it's their, you know, it's theirs and now this is your, this is your baby and you got to make sure that you know that it, that it blossoms.

Speaker 3:

Oh yeah, no, it was, it was scary to see them making the jump to from the corporate job because that had been my security for such a long time. I went from a place of being a and not having that, that security and then, and then breaking into this corporate environment at a very young age and working up that ladder and having a ton of security and then saying, okay, am I ready to take this leap in and not have that security anymore? I mean, it's when you, when you look at leaving from a place where you have a 401k, when you have health benefits, insurance and all of that kind of great stuff that you kind of take for vantage a little bit and you make this leap into being an independent contractor and now it's all on your shoulders. And then to take one step further and to build my own studio.

Speaker 3:

Now it's not just me here. I have five other instructors that I look after, um, and that I want to make sure that they're taken care of and that they're well supported. And so it becomes this thing of like, all right, we're, we're building a community and we're building a family and we're building a business. Even though it is yoga. And a lot of people will say, God, Stephanie, you're, you're so lucky to be doing yoga every single day. And it's like, yes, I am lucky to be doing yoga every single day, but that doesn't discount how hard this is and how, how much work we have to put into this to make it happen.

Speaker 2:

Sure. While you're building something, you know, that is more than just moving around in a room, you know, it, it's not just, uh, you know, stretching and doing those things. It's something deeper. It reminds me of almost, you know, coaching or like a community in a way that, that everybody supports one another. And you know, that that requires a lot of energy kind of output from, from you and your team. And you know, especially with what we're dealing with today, uh, which, you know, we can, we can certainly talk about that. My, I was, as you were going through that and talking about community and talking about being of service to other people, I was curious sort of, you know, who, who is, is coming to your facility, you know, is there a certain kind of demographic? Is it people who want to come in and just try yoga? Is it people who come in and they've got a particular goal in mind? Like they want to be more flexible. Is it people who want to, uh, you know, find a, a better state of Zen sort of, you know, in that community. And in that service that you're talking about, what does that look like?

Speaker 3:

So I'm going to steal a quote from, you know, my mentor Joe Polish about that. You, you sell them what they want, but you give them what they, and I truly believe that that's what we do here at the studio. So the majority of the time, especially cause we do aerial yoga. So when you look at those pictures on the website, like that looks fun, right? And it looks like something like, Oh man, I want to try that. And I want to do that. And, and I'll say this is that the silk support, everybody that's silk that you see on there, the um, it holds up to 2000 pounds. So like we, we support everybody. I've had people, um, I have one client that has, you know, an amputee, so she doesn't have a full arm and she still does all of those things that you see in there.

Speaker 3:

But what it is, is that people come because they want to try something fun. They want try something different and they're not necessarily sure what they're looking for. Now our demographic is mostly women, mostly women in their mid twenties to mid forties. Um, but I have, I have clientele that go all the way well into their sixties. Um, and I have a ton of men that come to, but majority of the clients are women 25 to 45. Um, and they come because they want to, they're looking for something, they want something different, they want something new and they don't, they, they haven't found a place where they necessarily fit in. And the thing that keeps them coming back is that they're able to learn more about themselves. And every single class and every single class is different. Every single time they show up, they're different and there's something new that they discover about themselves that they can take from the class out into the world.

Speaker 3:

And that's what I constantly try to serve for our population is that we're going to give you something different for you that you can use out in your every single day. So you're stuck in traffic and you know, you're late for a meeting, you spoke coffee on yourself and you're in that like really high place. All right, let's talk about the breathing, you know, and what do we do to calm ourselves back down, to drop back down into the body and to actually have a nice little like mental release on that, in those moments of high stress. And so I try to always give them something, and I have clients that even to this day speaking about like what's going on in the world right now. Um, classes aren't happening right? But I have clients that send me messages every single day about like, Stephanie, I can hear your voice in my head.

Speaker 3:

And so like I can, I can actually go through and face what I'm dealing with right now in reducing stress because I can repeat your words in your wisdom and my head and I can do that practice on my own at home. Um, and I think that that to me is the, we gave them what they need. You know, sometimes they come in because they want to lose weight, they want to get in better shape, they want to be more flexible. Um, are, they want to do some super crazy pose in the silks and we help them with all of that too. But the byproduct is, is that you're going to have that better mental clarity. You're going to be more mindful, you're going to be able to drop down into the body. We're going to reduce the stress, we're going to reduce the cortisol levels in your body and then we're going to give you a community and where you can come in, feel safe, feel supported and practice.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, the, I love that. I was always curious is how people, you know, I'm, I'm curious about how people take in general, but you know, how do they come to yoga? I was on before and I knew we were speaking this afternoon and I was on Instagram this morning and I saw a story or a message, a of a, a of a five year old girl who was doing yoga through zoom that her teacher was showing her, you know, showing her like a card of a squad or whatever she was doing. And then, you know, this five year old girls doing this, this yoga, and I thought, man, how cool is that? That, you know, they're getting sort of, uh, acclimated or introduced at least to this, to this modality that, you know, for my generation, I, you know, as, as a 34 year old boy, you know, yoga to me was not in my upbringing. You know, I just, nobody ever introduced me to that. And I think more and more lately it seems like it's kind of sort of permeated into more of the general population. Everybody's sort of seeing the benefits of it.

Speaker 3:

Oh yeah, completely. I always tell people all the time that I, I think that if we had as many yoga studios as we do, Starbucks, like the world would be such a better place. And I welcome that. Like I hope that one day we get to that where it's like there's a yoga studio on every single corner. Um, but a lot of yoga is going into schools, you know. So I go into schools, I teach all the time at different schools out here and do afterschool programs for students. Um, we've had kids classes here, especially in the silk because if you can help them have coping mechanisms, and that's something that's huge right now. When you think about how much screen time a child, an average child is on, right. When I was younger, we didn't have, you know, I-phones we didn't have the tablets, we didn't have all of that stuff.

Speaker 3:

And now you see kids all the time that are completely connected and they're connected to their screen. They're connected to that. And if we can help them have coping mechanisms and coping mechanisms are how do you calm your body down when you're upset, right? How do you, you know, take yourself from a really literally super high to that happy, calm medium. And so one of the things that yoga teaches you is that life is the ebb and flow, right? It's the ups and the downs. It's, you're going to have that high moment of great success. You're going to have the low moment of like, Oh no, I'm, I'm at my wit's end. And yoga teaches you how to find that calm middle line, right? So I'm not always stuck in my high highs. I'm not stuck in my low lows. I'm able to be calm and present.

Speaker 3:

And the the sane is, is that the stillness is in the now, right? So if you're right here in the now and you're not forecasting the future, you're not stuck in the past. You're here in the now. It's nice and calm. It always is. And so that's what yoga teaches you. And so if you can teach that to a child at a young age, then their ability and skillset to manage life, to manage the strife, to help, um, to help level them out. You know, when they have the, the tantrums, when life doesn't go the way that they want it to go, are they get super mad at something that they can find that stillness, that calmness that's now. And I think a lot of, a lot of schools, a lot of parents are beginning to realize that that's the power of yoga. And you know, of course movement is great for the body, being able to move, you feel good, you know, all of those good things. But also it's, it's the breath, it's the mind and it's the calmness that that helps with all of that. And so the more and more that we learn about yoga and the more that people can take that and bring that down to the younger generations, it's just helping them be able to deal with what's, what's coming up for them in life.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. You mentioned cortisol levels and stress reduction and all these different things. As you know, my, my primary job is I'm a criminal defense lawyer and you know, we work with a lot of people who go through events. You know, if somebody who's arrested by the police could be tackled, you know, they ultimately can feel they're the victim of, of what happened and many times they are because of the situation. Um, and you know, we, we do a lot of work in recovery spaces and you know, I personally myself am in recovery. And you know, one of the places that I actually met did my first yoga session was in a treatment facility. I was, you know, they brought out all this stuff and I, like I said at the beginning of the show, I couldn't really leave and you know, I had to do the yoga and I, I did find that there was some really good benefits to it. But my question is for, you know, for those types of populations, for people who've, who've kind of experienced some trauma, who, or maybe are charged with a crime, what, what type of modality, you know, of these or of others do you think would kind of address some of their needs most immediately?

Speaker 3:

It's, it's going to be that that yin restorative, right? That being able to drop down into the body. And so a lot of the times when you experience trauma, there's so much cortisol in your brain and what happens is that you know, your, your brain can't shrink, right? And the amount of cortisol that comes into their world actually add pressure onto the brain. And so it feels like it's constantly in this place of being squished, right? And so you want to get to a place where you're reducing the cortisol so you can allow the brain not to be squished and not to have that pressure on to it anymore. And one of the most natural ways to do that is through, um, saliva, right? So saliva, the more you can increase saliva, the more the saliva will eat. The cortisol in the brain. And so there's a modality of yoga called yoga Neidra, right?

Speaker 3:

And yoga Neidra falls into that like yin restorative. But what it is is it's yoga sleep. And so it will teach your body how in 45 minutes, if it's done correctly, 45 minutes can be equivalent to up to three hours of your deep sleep. Um, and that for me is something for people that have had traumatic experiences or they're in a place of high levels of cortisol in their body or you know, they're in that fight or flight state, they need that. They need that place of like, okay, I need that deep REM sleep and I need to reduce the cortisol levels in my body. And so yoga Neidra does that. So yoga need you as a guided meditation and it's that yoga sleep, um, and it's proven to, to have reduced levels of cortisol to help the body drop down into that. And when that happens, then you can start to talk about the somatic process of like rebuilding backup, right?

Speaker 3:

Cause our body holds on the big scene is the issues are in the tissues, right? Our body holds on to all of that. So if we can then start to release our somatic, our energy, our feelings that are captured into our tissue, through our movement and through our meditation, our body can actually recover from traumatic experiences that way. Um, and so that's why yoga and these type of practices are so important for people that have had those experiences. And when you think about it, everybody suffers from some of PTSD. There's not, there's not one human being out there that doesn't have that. And so if they have the ability to learn how to cope with their PTSD a little bit better, um, and maybe rewrite the story in their body and clear out those issues that are in their tissues, why not? Right? Why not have a, a better, you know, feeling in way to cope with things.

Speaker 2:

There's a quote that I've heard, uh, a number of times about sort of timing, right? If you, if you go to yoga for a certain number of days, do you know what quote I'm talking about?

Speaker 3:

Yeah. Yeah. So it's, you know, if you go to yoga and you'll have to forgive me, I'll probably love this up a little bit, but it's like if you go to yoga three times a week, you're going to change your, your body, right? If you go to yoga every single day for 30 days, you're going to change your life, right? So there's a, there's a difference between going to yoga for fitness, you know, which, which is great, right? Because yoga does a lot of things for fitness. Um, but going to yoga for actually changing your life and having an impact on your life, it's that daily practice, right? And some days it might be five minutes, some days it might be 90 minutes, some days it's, you know, in the morning or in the night or whatever. But having this constant, consistent practice, it's going to change you and it's going to change how you approach things and how you look at things.

Speaker 3:

Yoga, the actual physical practice, the OSS, the Austin apart is one of eight limbs of yoga, right? So that's how yoga starts is Asana practice. I'm there. Right. Then there are seven other limbs of yoga. So once you conquer kind of the physical part, then you start to dive into the other seven limbs. Like how are you treating yourself? How are you eating? What is your meditation practice and how are you treating others? How are you showing up? And so it starts to, to do almost like the 12 commandments, you know, type of thing. But it's, it's the eight limbs of yoga.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. It's so, it's, it's wild. You know, there's, there's so much out there that I just don't know, you know? And, and you said yoga Neidra I've, I've forgot about that one. I heard about it. It sounds amazing. I probably should look that up because, uh, you know, Lord knows nobody's sleeping right now. And,

Speaker 3:

okay.

Speaker 2:

I guess how, how are you dealing with that? How are you dealing with the transition of, you know, going from building a yoga practice where, you know, I'm sure you've got your five instructors, you've got full classes, you've got all these people coming in, you've got everybody who is finding sort of that inner sense of peace right in there. They're there, they're maintaining their levels, and now everything is totally upended, right? So it's like now, now people need yoga and they need that balance more than ever, but they can't come get it from your, from you. So

Speaker 3:

[inaudible],

Speaker 2:

how are you, how are you transitioning on that? I mean, how are you dealing with that? It's not, it's not an easy question. I know.

Speaker 3:

No, no, no, it's not. And it's, and it's, it's, it's challenging, right? So as a business, you know, in the business mind is, okay, we're right now, income's not coming in, right? Revenue is not coming in because we make money based off of people's memberships, right? So if they're not able to come to class, I'm not going to charge them a membership price. And so I've, I've put all memberships on hold for right now. And then we're, we're not prospecting, we're not sending now, we're not marketing, we're not doing any of that kind of stuff cause there's nothing for, there's nothing of value for them to receive from us right now since classes are cut. Um, and so as a business it's like, okay, so I have to pivot, right? So how do I serve my clients still? How do I serve my students and how do I, I still find a place of, of revenue.

Speaker 3:

So it's a win, win, win for everyone, right. So of course you're seeing right now a lot of studios are going online. A lot of them are able to pivot and to make that choice of saying, okay, here we go. We're going to do some online classes. A lot of yoga studios are using zoom just like we are right now to meet that need and scheduling zoom classes for their, their clients. Um, what I'm doing is I'm using an app, it's called mighty network and it allows for you to have a, a connection group, right? So I can then send out this app to all of my students right now there that work with us. And I can put not only, you know, daily quotes and stuff on there and all of those kind of uplifting moments and things to share with them about how to, to manage through the stressful time.

Speaker 3:

But then I can also put classes on there, right? So I can give them classes, I can give them five minutes meditations, I can do a 10 minute flow, I can do any of those types of things. So that's, that's how we've pivoted a little bit to allow one revenue to still come in and then also give something, a value to our students, to our clients so that we're still meeting their expectations and what they need now. That took us, I mean a few weeks to just get set up. And so there was a few weeks of like, Oh no, what are we doing? Right? Um, and as the business and as an entrepreneur, it's like, okay, well what are my options out there? Okay. And so I know I need to put all of this stuff on for my clients, for my students, for my instructors, and I need to take care of that.

Speaker 3:

But I also have overhead. I have a giant studio. I'm a big space that's just sitting up, dude right now. And I have a nice lease on that, that I need to take care of. And I also have a business loan that helped me fund all of the construction and everything else that that was needed in order to build this studio. So luckily I think it's, it's fantastic how many, um, options there are that are out there that people just don't know about, right. Um, are they're not, they're not able to ask the right questions to get the things that they need. So for me, I was able to ask my, my landlord of our ours studio, um, about what we could do to defer rent. So maybe right now I just pay my, my triple lens, you know, my HOA type of fees, and then I take my money and I add it onto the very end of, of my, my lease.

Speaker 3:

And be able to pay that. And they're accommodating that right now for me. So instead of paying thousands of dollars a month on my rent right now, I'm paying a few hundred dollars that will help the landlord pay the things that they need to pay right now in order to keep the, the complex in the shopping center up and running. And then we've worked out a deal to make sure that my rent is, we'll be caught up by the end of my lease. Um, and so that's huge. So I don't have to go into more debt right now. I don't have to scramble to find a way to, to cover that big expense because I'm able to work with them. The other thing is the SBA has been phenomenal, phenomenal. And so I already had an SBA loan that was for opening up the studio and they're, they're taking care of six months of my SBA payments and I don't have to pay them back whatsoever.

Speaker 3:

So they're actually paying out for me until October. And that's huge, you know? So those are my two biggest overheads and those are taking care of. And then as clients are paying for what we're serving them onto the app and things like that, I'm able to then help my instructors and help pay, you know, the electricity and all those other fees that come along with that too. So I, I'm not making the same type of revenue that I'm normally would make right now, but I'm also, I'm also very, um, lenient with my landlord and my lenders and they're actually working with me right now. So the more you can stay in communication with them and talk to them about different options, it's, it's something that I think we're all coming together and being United on to make it, to make it work.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, that's great that the people who you do business with are understanding in that way. I think it's great advice and it's enough, you know, to weather the storm after this stuff starts to turn the corner. Are you, you know, are you expecting sort of a, a flood or avert a return into your office or into your, into your space? I know how enthusiastic yoga people are. So I don't know that there's going to be much to keep them away.

Speaker 3:

I, you know, I, I, I have mixed feelings about it right now. I think that there's, there's a portion of my students that are immediately, no matter what, if I would tell them that I'm even sitting in the studio right now, that they would be out the front door, like not being on it, trying to get in. Um, and they, they wouldn't care. Right? And we still have to do what we need to do to, to weather all of this and make sure that everybody is safe. Um, but I know there's going to be people that are going to be scarred from this, right? They're going to have some, some pretty horrific experiences, right? Maybe they've lost their job or you know, whatever a family member was impacted. And so they might not be so ready to just jump right back into the economy and go back to things the way that they work.

Speaker 3:

And that's okay. Um, what I'm planning on doing is that I would like to continue to do the online, right? So if I can continue to meet the standards of those people and meet them where they're at and give an option for in studio classes for the people that are ready to come back, I'll do that. Um, so I think no matter what the business is never going to come back to the way the business was. It's never going to be the same again. And to have that expectation is a little bit naive for, for me. So I'm trying to think about, okay, how can I make this a positive for everyone, right? How can I walk away from this in a different, in a different way. And what's great about it is that I certify instructors to teach our twisted aerial yoga method. And so now I've, I've taught studios out in, in TextUs, I'm a couple out in Kansas and I have one in Missouri that I'm working with.

Speaker 3:

And so now I have an online modality to do that in. So instead of them having to fly out here, so now I have a wider reach of who I can teach my teaching philosophy to and who I can and help bring the type of yoga that we do across the country. Um, and so to me, that's, that's powerful. That's a whole different beast than just having a brick and mortar studio. And so it's forcing me to grow the business and it's forcing me to shift a little bit more than, than I was ready to at the time. And, um, and now the universe is saying, all right, here we're going Stephanie, there's no stopping it. We're going to do it. So, um, there's a lot of good that's coming out of this pivot. Uh, of course. I wish it wouldn't have happened in the way that it did.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, you're being extremely proactive about it. And you know, I do some other coaching and things with other lawyers and I've had a lot of conversations with other attorneys from around the country just to understand how people are responding to this entire situation. And some people are not doing what you're doing, you know, they are in, in total panic mode, fear mode, canceling everything, selling everything, closing the doors, you know, basically putting their heads in the sand and crawling under the blanket and waiting for this to all blow over, which I think is a very poor strategy, but you know, they're entitled to do that. How are you staying positive? How are you, you know, leaning on other resources? You know, I know we didn't meet through yoga, we met through another group of, you know, very supportive, uh, you know, kind of entrepreneurs, business owners, marketers. Um, but, but what are you doing to kind of keep your energy up and stay so positive because you are doing a lot, I mean, you're, you're opening doors and all sorts of different places.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. You know, that, that's a great question. And one of the things is that I, I try to always start my day with some sort of mind mindset, right? So for me, it's journaling. I am, I've been journal where I like to write out the, the feelings and the emotions and then get to a place of where I can take them into action, right? So, um, one of the ways that I journal every single morning is I write on the right side of the piece of paper. And then on the left side, after I wrote whatever it is that I wrote, I pull out the action items. So then I start to list the action items and whatever I'm writing. So I might be writing about an experience that happened, but from that, I'm going to learn from it. And what did I learn from it? It goes on the left side.

Speaker 3:

And then I look at the left side throughout the whole entire day. And so this mindset of, um, of because fear is a big deal, right? Fear is a huge thing and it can take over your, your thoughts. And so you'd have to get out of the fear and you have to get into a place of learning. And one of the big things is that I listened to a podcast not that long ago. Um, there was a vice from a criminal, right. Um, he had lived in solitary confinement for over two years and you know, the rest of the world, dad was kind of in that right, were, were confined in quarantine and he was explaining what he did in order to keep his mind, save a life and to do those things. And it was all about learning for him. So it was always this mindset and this learning and how can I learn, how can I spend my time doing something that's gonna benefit me?

Speaker 3:

So yeah, I might not be able to go outside and do all this other stuff that I'm normal and used to doing, but I have all of these other resources and then finding that gratitude for those. So do I want to sit down and binge watch my, you know, most favorite reality TV show right now? Heck yeah, I do. But I'm not going to write, I'm going to, instead, I'm going to commit to myself that I'm going to read this, I'm going to do this and I'm going to take action on that. And then maybe then I'll reward myself with a little bit of, you know, the reality TV show later on. Um, I'm going to make sure that I'm still active and annuity. Right. And that's something that's huge for us right now is that we could get stuck in a place of being a couch potato and that's fun and it's comfortable, but you know, at some point in time you got to get up and move.

Speaker 3:

So I always still make sure that I'm doing my yoga practice and I, I do that in my living room and my backyard and my bedroom wherever it's at, I just find that space and I take that time to do the physical activity. Then on top of that, I'm, I'm making sure that I'm, I'm actually eating correctly and, and that's a huge one right now because we can get into that process food type of mode and not that comfort food isn't, isn't, um, acceptable because it totally is. But when you eat nothing but the processed food and the comfort food, what are you doing to your body right now? And so I'm making sure to nurse my body. So I spend the time in the morning being mindful. I do my, my journaling, I do my to do list, I make sure that I'm moving throughout the day.

Speaker 3:

I set boundaries for myself as far as like, okay, I want to do these things over here that I know aren't good for me. So I'm going to do these things over here that are going to be great for me. And once these are done, then you can go do these. And so I still have a work day. I still get up at the same point in time. I still have structure, I still have a routine and I, and my work at this time. And then I go and I, you know, spend time with my family. And that's, that's big too because working remote or working from home, it's very easy to say, Oh, work is right there. I'm going to keep working and, and workaholic part of life. That's a coping mechanism. So then I find myself into that place. I pause and I say, okay, it's time to go spend time with the family. It's time to go do dinner with a family and let's make a dinner. Let's, you know, take the time to be mindful about what we're putting into our bodies right now and how we're spending our time together. So it's, it's still very much a routine. It's still very much a structure. It's very much, you know, um, being mindful about every single activity that I'm doing right now. And what is the lesson that I'm learning from all of this?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I love it. Great advice. I love talking to real true yoga people because you have it all figured out and you've got a system and you just, you just perform. And I mean, it sounded so great. You know, and it's good advice. People are wondering, you know, why they're feeling depressed and why they're feeling sad. And it's like, well, you're, you're, you're not sleeping. You're watching TV all day. You're playing video games, you're drinking yourself to death. Like this is not a 30 day pleasure cruise. You know, you should still be doing something productive. And yes, the universe brought the coronavirus upon us all. But if you leave this next 30 days, not a stronger person or you know, learning a skill or doing something, creating something valuable for the rest of the world, that's on you, that's not on the Corona virus.

Speaker 3:

Correct. Correct. And there's, it's, it's just, it is that fear, right? And that it's, it's that what am I going to do and how am I going to cope with it? And so instead of coping with it, with all of those comfort foods, pleasure activities, it's time to actually step back and say, okay, I have the time to actually focus on me and change me and it have an impact on me. I don't have all of these other stressors that normally would impact me throughout a day. So now I can really dive into how am I having an impact on me, right? And what can I control and how can I contribute?

Speaker 2:

Tell me a little bit more about the studio. So where is it, um, how can people connect with you? I know they can't come take a class right now, but they certainly can connect with you online or follow you. Just, you know, kind of absorb your material because you will open again.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, absolutely. So thank you. Um, the studio itself is just self of ASU. It's on Broadway in Miller. It's in a little shopping complex there. The sign is ginormous. You can't miss it. And then of course, right behind me, this is this giant mural that's 22 feet long yoga person. So when you walk past our big windows out front here, you can't help but see there's a giant woman painted onto the wall. Um, so we're, we're pretty easy to spot there. Um, online, we're always at twist at yoga studios. So you can find us on Twitter, you can find us on Instagram, you can find us on Facebook under Twista yoga studios and our website is@yogastudios.com. Thank you.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Awesome. Um, w was there anything else?

Speaker 3:

Nope.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so I would certainly encourage people to follow you. You know, I know you, I know the people that you, uh, you know, you associate with. Obviously you're highly knowledgeable and all this stuff and you know, yoga is something, it's, I've been kicking myself, everybody that I talk to, I've got back problems and all sorts of stuff. They're like, you just got to go do yoga. So you know, I'm gonna make a point of it to come check your studio out, maybe do a class or, or two. And I appreciate you taking the time to educate us. I appreciate your insight on how this whole situation is unfolding and your, your thoughts on weathering it. So thanks again for coming on the show and uh, I'll, I'll see you around. Thank you, Stephanie. Thank you for having me. This is fantastic. All right, well have a good day. Stay safe and you know, wash your hands. I will catch you on the next one.

Speaker 1:

The ruler nation podcast is brought to you by the RNR law group, Arizona's premier criminal defense and personal injury law firm available at www dot RR law, a z.com or give us a call, four eight zero four zero zero one three.