Gruler Nation Podcast

Episode #96: Business in a COVID- 19 World with Suzanne Feinberg

April 08, 2020 Robert F. Gruler Jr., Esq.
Gruler Nation Podcast
Episode #96: Business in a COVID- 19 World with Suzanne Feinberg
Chapters
Gruler Nation Podcast
Episode #96: Business in a COVID- 19 World with Suzanne Feinberg
Apr 08, 2020
Robert F. Gruler Jr., Esq.

ATTN Law Firms and Small Business Owners! Are you interested in learning how to market your law firm or small business during this crazy time dealing with COVID- 19? If your answer is yes, then tune in! Today, I spoke with Suzanne Feinberg from Power Vison 360 about business in a COVID- 19 world and how to flatten the curve with her special marketing strategy!  

 

Suzanne has been helping professional creatives design and implement strategic social media and video marketing campaigns. She leads webinars for industry leaders such as Leadpages, Animoto and Photobiz as well as contributes her client success stories in vendor blogs. She has been creating online courses for creatives as well as digital monthly magazines to help promote her client's business. Suzanne is also certified by the Digital Marketer, the Fletcher Method, and by Leadpages as a conversion marketing coach.  

 

Suzanne recently returned from the March Social Media Marketing World 2020 Conference, and her biggest takeaway from the conference was to establish one- to- one relationships and make sure you are connecting in a meaningful, mindful, and real way especially during the coronavirus when we are socially isolated.  

 

After watching the podcast, Suzanne has provided a free Getting Stated Worksheet for all listeners! The worksheet can be accessed here: Create Engaging Testimonials Resource Guide  

 

Interested in connecting with Suzanne? Visit her PowerVision360 Website at https://powervision360.com and be sure to connect with her on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Instagram @powervision360 

#covid19 #coronavirus #smallbusiness #lawfirm #marketing #powervision360 #marketingstrategy #flattenthecurve #creatives #socialmedia #video #clienttestimonials #videotestimonials #marketingcoach #socialmediamarketing #socialmediamarketingworld #connect #socialdistancing #sociallyisolated #scottsdalearizona #arizona  

Show Notes Transcript

ATTN Law Firms and Small Business Owners! Are you interested in learning how to market your law firm or small business during this crazy time dealing with COVID- 19? If your answer is yes, then tune in! Today, I spoke with Suzanne Feinberg from Power Vison 360 about business in a COVID- 19 world and how to flatten the curve with her special marketing strategy!  

 

Suzanne has been helping professional creatives design and implement strategic social media and video marketing campaigns. She leads webinars for industry leaders such as Leadpages, Animoto and Photobiz as well as contributes her client success stories in vendor blogs. She has been creating online courses for creatives as well as digital monthly magazines to help promote her client's business. Suzanne is also certified by the Digital Marketer, the Fletcher Method, and by Leadpages as a conversion marketing coach.  

 

Suzanne recently returned from the March Social Media Marketing World 2020 Conference, and her biggest takeaway from the conference was to establish one- to- one relationships and make sure you are connecting in a meaningful, mindful, and real way especially during the coronavirus when we are socially isolated.  

 

After watching the podcast, Suzanne has provided a free Getting Stated Worksheet for all listeners! The worksheet can be accessed here: Create Engaging Testimonials Resource Guide  

 

Interested in connecting with Suzanne? Visit her PowerVision360 Website at https://powervision360.com and be sure to connect with her on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Instagram @powervision360 

#covid19 #coronavirus #smallbusiness #lawfirm #marketing #powervision360 #marketingstrategy #flattenthecurve #creatives #socialmedia #video #clienttestimonials #videotestimonials #marketingcoach #socialmediamarketing #socialmediamarketingworld #connect #socialdistancing #sociallyisolated #scottsdalearizona #arizona  

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Speaker 1:

Hey everybody. My name is Robert Gruler. I want to welcome you to a very special edition of a podcast that we're doing. It's going to be a simulcast. Really. We're doing it for both the Gruler nation and for the Gruler method. Today we're talking about marketing. The reason why I want to spread it around to both different audiences because I think it can be very valuable to both, both for attorneys who want to learn how to market their firm, especially in the new age when we're dealing with the Coronavirus and covid 19 as well as for other non-lawyers for regular kind of out business owners, people who have small businesses who also would like some tips and tricks and some, some really insight on what you can do now to be more effective in the new marketplace that we're seeing ourselves in. And so to help us have that conversation, I want to welcome somebody who has become a good friend of mine. Her name is Suzanne Feinberg. She is with power vision three 60 and she is going to explain a little bit more about a, about a lot today actually. But the title of her presentation is called business in a COBIT 19 world. Flatten the curve with this marketing strategy. And so I want to, first of all, welcome you. Thank you for being here. Thanks for your time today, Suzanne.

Speaker 2:

Thank you so much. I'm so glad you invited me. It's so nice to be able to talk to a different audience these days.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, well we could use it because a lot of attorneys and a lot of small business owners are very confused about, you know, what, what we should be doing right now because there's, there's a lot of, uh, kind of disinformation out there about when things are going to get back on track. And there's a lot of, uh, of sort of, you know, gurus who are out there throwing around what they think is the best thing that small business owner should be doing. And some of those tidbits can be conflicting with one another. So, uh, you know, I have worked with you for a number of years. You've been somebody who I've sent emails to and asked for, uh, you know, for guidance on some of the projects that I've been working on. And so I know that you're somebody who's very well versed in these things and you're a trusted resource. And so I, um, I'm excited that you're going to be here today to share some wisdom with, with all of us.

Speaker 2:

I'm really glad to be here. Um, something I've recently noticed, Robert, that really bothers me is the emails that I'm getting from people are all about how I have to buy something. How do I have to buy something as opposed to just helping me with something. And I sorta resent that right now because things are so hairy financially for personal reasons and for business reasons for everybody. So what I really wanted to do today was to give people a method of doing something that was, um, either free, if they already had resources or very, very inexpensive to do and very quick to do.

Speaker 1:

Well, I love that. I think it's awesome and I know that many people will take you up on it. So I don't want to want to take up too much time. I know you have a whole presentation sort of ready to go for us. So I think I'll turn it over to you and we can, let's jump into it.

Speaker 2:

Great. That sounds great. Thank you Robert. So, okay, so just a moment. Let me just, okay, so we're talking about a strategy that's valid no matter how the business environment has changed and why should we interrupt the strategy? Why should we implement the strategy now? Everything we're doing, Robert right now is about disruption. It's disruption in the delivery. It's disruption in how we take Uber cars. It's [inaudible], uh, everything is a new way of doing everything and it's a gig economy. So the Carvana, uh, the Corona virus has come along and it is a disruption to how everybody is doing business right now. So I think it's important to implement the strategy right now and be ahead of the disruption. So what's being disrupted? We're all self isolated. Um, the owners of the companies, the employees, the clients, you know, we no longer can do business the same way we were doing business a couple of weeks ago.

Speaker 2:

The supply chain and the vendor availability, a lot of people have let their employees work remotely from home. So support teams are not as active supply chains of getting things, um, to your home to get up and running remote if you're in business for yourself can be very difficult. And then time management, we're so used to coming into the office on a work schedule and on, um, and, and how we deal with clients and how we break our day up. But now we're working out of the home or we're working in an office without our employees there and we have to look at time management a little bit differently. So this is sort of what I've noticed about, you know, the virus and how things are happening with the virus.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. And I agree with all of that. I mean, this has been something that has kind of happened to a lot of people. They've, they've seen a lot of these government changes in terms of policy that is there, that are causing them to be, you know, forcefully isolated and as causing these disruptions. And what, what I've seen at least, you know, amongst my staff and what we're trying to do to avoid that is to put some intentionality behind some of the, of the disruption to say, we know it's being disrupted, we're recognizing it, but we're being proactive. We're, we're, we're taking some steps and sort of just identifying what's happening in the fact that, you know, you've obviously done that, right? This is what you're seeing out there.

Speaker 2:

Right. And, um, one of the things that I've noticed all the time about your firm, um, Robert and Rihanna, how you run you and your partner in your firm is that you are ahead of the curve on just about everything. And, and you're, you're right there dealing with things. So, um, originally I was going to be talking about social media marketing world and what my big takeaways were. And I made the decision to go there despite the fact that the virus had started because I thought it was extremely important. And Michael Stelzner, the um, owner of social media examiner who puts this show on assured me that they were taking all sorts of precautions. So I went and I'm very glad I went because they changed the entire program based on what was happening with the Corona virus. And my biggest takeaway was that we needed to establish one-to-one relationships.

Speaker 2:

That it was no longer about the thousands and thousands and thousands of followers, but about the followers who would interact with us. And that we need to connect to these people to establish the relationships through meaningful and mindful and realistic type of, uh, connection methods. And this becomes even more important in this world of social isolization because we don't really have the means to talk to huge groups of people or communicate with huge groups of people. Some of us are fortunate and understand how to do internet marketing. Others don't. So these are things that people are going to have to be learning. And there are lots of free resources out there to learn how to become more active socially on a one-to-one basis with a meaningful, mindful and intentional rather than realistic type of connection. And so, yeah.

Speaker 1:

Uh, I just had a question about social media marketing world. So when you were there the in March 1st and first through the third, there was a pretty strong indication that this was going to be a big deal and they kept it on. They, you're saying that they actually adjusted the curriculum a bit. So the people who were up to speak, they were sort of aware that this was coming. We saw this tidal wave approaching from the sea and they, they kind of shifted their talks to actually communicate about how to deal with this.

Speaker 2:

Yes. So I'm somebody who is very, very popular in the social media world is Mari Smith. She changed her entire keynotes, uh, speech, um, people like, um, Sue B Zimmerman, um, with Instagram, um, who was a main, um, Instagram instructor and influencer. She changed everything. Um, we had John Nimo who was LinkedIn and McKayla Alexis who was LinkedIn and they also became one-to-one relationship. Um, it just, Charlene Johnson with, um, Instagram, um, and, and Hedley also an Instagram person. All their presentations were primarily about establishing this one-to-one connection and this meaningful and mindful type of communication with people. And it, it wasn't that CoBiz was the main source of what they were saying and they were information. It was, Hey, this has come along and it's taught us something that we needed to know that, you know, people have, and I find this in my business, I have creatives, um, create online marketing and my photographers are like Nat geo photographers, Canon Explorer of lights.

Speaker 2:

They have millions of followers, but they're not selling them anything. So just having a million followers looking at your pictures, what's it doing for you? Whereas most successful people, from what I learned from social media marketing world, have about 2,500 people in their social media accounts. And each one of them they can interact with, um, individually. And I learned the different ways of interacting individually on every platform, which really was helpful. And of course there's another either podcast or another, uh, another time where people can contact me for that type of information because we're going to concentrate on a specific strategy. But it was very interesting.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. And that's, that's very valuable. I mean, just to absorb that because that, I imagine you're in a room full of people who are also, you know, this is, this is so unprecedented that that they're just, they're having to sort of create what the best strategies are on the fly and the fact that you've got to be there and be part of that process is pretty cool.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it was a little scary. I mean, there were 500 people in a room and all the scenes together. So I was always on an end seat at the back of the room so I could exit quickly. Everybody was walking around giving you sprays of hand sanitizers. They was soap and water and every bathroom, bathrooms were cleaned all the time. So they really, the San Diego convention center did a really good job of making us feel comfortable there. Yeah. Cause we didn't have that six foot social distance rule back then, which I would have observed that I'd known about it, but yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. Well you're doing okay. Right? You're getting, you're healthy now, so you're good. Three weeks. So I made it out alive. That's good.

Speaker 2:

Alive. If I get sick now it's from Arizona. It's not San Diego. So moving forward, um, what we want to look at is what your clients can do for their business to connect and establish the relationships when they're socially isolated. So who can benefit from the strategy we're going to talk about. So whether you're the lawyer, whether you're a real estate agent, you own a restaurant, you're a fitness coach, you're a real estate agent, you have stores. It really, this, this can benefit everybody. This is not just specifically for a lawyer specifically for photographer or specifically for, um, you know, a fitness coach. It really applies to, to everyone out there.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. Awesome. Cool. Yeah, I think that's great.

Speaker 2:

So what, why does it apply? So we all have to go through the buyer's journey and the buyer's journey hasn't changed. We still want to attract, convert close and delight. We want to get those prospects in one end of the funnel. I want to come out with, with sales and we want them to come brand advocates. Cause that's the goal of any sale or any, any company, no matter what you're selling. And so that really basically stays the same. But getting there has changed and that's what we're going to be looking at. And um, I think that if you, if you say, okay, business hasn't changed. It's just how I'm going to get there, that's changed and I think everybody can sort of fit into that model.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. And I agree with that. And on that last slide that you had, you know, when you, when you were saying that it essentially works in any business and I think that's true. Yeah. That one, it can really work in any business. It's something that I think it's true for a lot of business strategies that are actually good. You know, the a law firm is a business. What we deliver our legal services. So if you have a good business strategy, you know, in a, in a the restaurant or a financial company or whatever and it's just good sound fundamentals, you can certainly apply to a law firm or anywhere else. Then your other slide, the one that you, you, you just had about the client journey. This concept is one of my, one of my favorite concepts and it's something that I wish a lot more, uh, small business owners and small attorneys were a little bit more familiar with on, on how to act and where to act, where you fall in that pipeline. Because, uh, if you know what stage you're at, you can be way more effective rather than just trying to, uh, you know, delight somebody but you haven't attracted them yet or try to convert somebody that doesn't know anything about you're trying to close somebody that doesn't know anything about you. So this is so important and I just wanted to hammer home that, that identifying where you're at in this journey is, is, is

Speaker 2:

critical. It is. And um, I don't think it's really changed. It's just changed the type of blog you're doing. It's just changed the type of landing page you're doing or what the messages in that landing page, um, or in that free trial or in the content that you're giving to your advocates. So, um, I agree with you and there are a lot of companies out there that offer the buyer's journey as a course. And I'm sure the gorilla method has some of this in it as well. I know I went to one to your web. Uh, I went to one of your workshops and you, you really went over this very nicely. So it's something you and I agree on that this is one of the most important things that a business needs to learn to do in marketing, either hard marketing, like old fashioned marketing, um, brick and mortar marketing or in online marketing.

Speaker 2:

Okay. So the first thing I'm going to talk about is the biggest thing that you can do to help your business get through the COBIT crisis and move through the buyer's journey. And then I'll walk your viewers and your listeners through the process of achieving success with this technique. And then I'm going to show you some examples and one of the reasons we're doing it instead of just, you know, talking like a regular podcast is because I want to show you some video examples and some examples, um, that are hard to explain verbally but visually, and that's what's so good about video is visually they show you everything. And then as a bonus at the end, um, we'll be giving out a free getting started worksheets so that you can start simply in an inexpensive way within one hour of watching the podcast will listening to the podcast.

Speaker 1:

Love it. I'm excited.

Speaker 2:

So Robert, are you getting curious what this biggest thing is and how you be here?

Speaker 1:

Um, I'm at the edge of my seat. I'm, I'm shaking in my boots right now.

Speaker 2:

I'm so excited about this. Um, so we're actually talking about something very old fashioned but very new. And that's online testimonials. And why do we use online testimonials for social proof? Because your potential buyers and clients want to know what other people like themselves have to say about the experience. You know, what's Robert gruel like as you know, a defense attorney. They want to know, they want to read what other people say about you, which by the way is very good cause I looked up some of your reviews before we uh, got on. And then, um, when you give a personal testimonial and a review, it fosters trust, it lusts, it allows you to get to know the person and it allows you to get to know the business and what other people think of the business. So this is what we're looking to do is to establish social proof.

Speaker 2:

And what is a testimonial? Well, a testimonial is a public expression of appreciation usually by an individual who's pleased with the overall experience with your product, service or employee. Somebody got off a traffic ticket for instance. And you as a business owner gathered, you own that testimonial and you manage the testimonial by providing the yes service and products. And 99.99% of testimonials are always positive because people don't give negative testimonials. They give negative reviews. Yeah. So what is a review? A review is a person's perception of the experience along with a rating, usually on a sliding scale. And you'll see that five star, four star, maybe one to 10. Um, you have a net promoter score that you can add in there and it's gathered, managed usually by a third party like Yelp or Google plus or Google or Mmm. TripAdvisor and the, the sliding range can go from negative to positive.

Speaker 2:

So I'm not going to make a difference right now between a testimonial and a review. Um, there are two different ways of looking at it and marketing it. But for right now, let's just think about the fact that we're trying to get people to respond and give us these testimonials. Okay. Love it. So I always like to start off with the statistics because that's very scientific and it gives the proof. So, um, there is a company out there called the commerce. They're not just about big commerce, they're about business in general. And they did a study and 92% of all consumers who read online reviews, w, uh, were considering a purchase. 88% of viewers trust online reviews as much as a personal recommendation, which means that if I was looking for a defense attorney and I said to my next door neighbor, cause I know they ran a red light, um, and they got off and they recommended you seeing 20 online reviews under Yelp or under one of these, um, a trust authority type review companies.

Speaker 2:

I might take that review as much as a personal recommendation because maybe, I don't know, a personal recommendation. So it's very important in the decision making process to have those, um, testimonials and reviews out there. And then 72% responded that positive online reviews make them trust the business more. Um, because people know you can give a one or a two. I mean, how many times do you get out of an Uber and say this was a three, the car was dirty or expelled or you know, the radio was too loud or whatever. So people are familiar that people give negative reviews. It just so happens more people do positive, more people do negative rather than positive reviews. But everybody does positive testimonials. Okay. So now, um, in this study, um, it was found that when you increase the volume of testimonials or reviews and you have 50 plus reviews per product or per service, it can be a 4% increase in conversion rate, which is 4.5% conversion rate increase, which is pretty big.

Speaker 2:

Um, and in terms of increasing the number of sales, um, new products, specific reviews can drive your search traffic. It brings you up in the keyword in the rankings on the Google page. And I'm sure that one of the things, um, I, I'm not sure I remember the name of the person that spoke at your workshop. We, you had a very good Google person there and she was talking about, you know, very specifically that these reviews help the rankings. Um, and then 10, 10 or more reviews can result in a 15 to 20% increase in search traffic. So that's, that's really a good, um, a good result. And then three and four star reviews. You may not be happy with them, but they actually contain two times more product suggestions. It means you can improve your services, you know where your problems are, you know where you need to improve. So even not getting a good review is, is a good thing to have up there because you then know what to do with it.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, it's valid. It's valuable data. And of course nobody likes to see the ones and the twos, but sometimes you've got to, you've got a pretty big problem in your business if somebody is, is, you know, leaving a one or a two on there. So that's a good indicator that you should change that before it causes some really, really dramatic problems. And in a law firm that can be very serious. It can be, you know, a client is complaining about about something that's going to lead to a bar complaint and potentially jeopardize your license. So it is still valid. Can you tell us a little bit more? So you know, the, the number of the 4.6%, you know, that sounds like a small number, but what we're talking about here, right, is, is you know, the more reviews that you have, the more likely that somebody's doing a search in Google, they're going to convert to picking up the phone and calling you. Right,

Speaker 2:

right. Yeah. So when you, um, a 4.6 increase means if a thousand people are searching and find you, Mmm. And you only have like two reviews or you don't have any reviews, maybe only one or two people may pick up the phone, maybe none. But if you have 50 or more reviews or you have a high level, I happen to think some industries you don't quite need 50 reviews, but um, if you do have good set of reviews, more people will pick up the phone and call you. They become a lead rather than just a viewer. They move that much that much more through the buyer's journey.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. And that's critical. Yeah. And that's critical in that. And that is a big number, especially when you're talking about those types of activities. A lot of the time people, you know when, when you're talking about online marketing, the numbers are small in general, right? The click through rate conversion rate, all of those numbers are like one to 3% somebody landing on your landing page. I think generally speaking, the numbers, like 1% of those people are going to do something on your landing page. So if you can turn that from a one to a 4.6 increase that that's like massive. So, so I just wanted to belabor that point because it is important.

Speaker 2:

Oh, it's so important. And I think it's the most important reason for having reviews as well as testimonials. But you know, like I said, reviews is a whole nother, um, way of managing your business. So we're going to concentrate more on saying, I review, it's like a testimonial. So if you have 50 testimonials on your page and we'll look at some pages, um, later on, that will show you, you know, how to get more testimonials on the page itself,

Speaker 2:

the most striking data. Um, that we found in this particular, um, blog post by Emily Colon on the big commerce site was that, um, it's not about the volume, it's about the interaction. It's about the social, uh, social interaction. And it's about that one to one relationship and trust, which goes back to what we started out with the premise of what did I learn? It's social media marketing. So, you know, even looking at this data which was done prior to, um, the COBIT, it's, it's, it was still valid, but people weren't really looking at it that way. And then there was some really interesting results that I really liked and that was, um, when you have a plan strategy for testimonials or reviews, 58% more are likely to convert than if you don't have a strategy. So you can just throw those things out there against the wall and hopefully something will, the reviews, the testimonials, hoping something will hit.

Speaker 2:

But when you incorporate it into a strategy, um, your landing pages, how are they positioned on your landing page? How are they positioned on your website? Um, every, everything you do helps make that conversion more likely. Now we're not talking, it's a different type of conversion than the 4.6. We were just talking about. We're talking about of those people who would convert 58% more likely to, with the strategy versus no strategy. And then when you have testimonials and when you have reviews, 62% more revenue per site visitor. So that means like, and, and, and I got this from, um, I also look this up on something called SamCart, which is a, um, landing page sales cart for online marketers. And they also state that if you put the testimonials on there, [inaudible] is more like 59%. So we're in the same range. But what will happen is, is that people who are spending $100 might spend $162 or people who are spending $10 might spend, um, let's see, 60% more, six, you know, $16 or whatever.

Speaker 2:

It allows them to, you know, buy more because they trust it more. I just had an example of that. Um, I was looking for my, um, iPad. I was looking for a, um, something to hold the iPad up and I didn't, with all my photography equipment, I don't have an iPad holder. So I was online and I'm looking and I'm looking and I'm reading the reviews and if I hadn't read the reviews and I was just buying, I probably would've bought the basic item. But because they showed me a video of different things, I was able to go from $79 to $85 by adding on options that I thought were really cool in the video. So, and these were testimonial videos that I was watching. So, you know, it does actually, it actually, and I wasn't even thinking about that. I was just thinking, how can I get this to me, you know, very quickly because I, because of Covance, I have to rearrange how I'm doing with my online life, uh, teaching. And I thought I would use the iPad for that. And then it also, um, people will buy 3% more per order. I really couldn't find any figures or explanations of that to fit in with the numbers, but it was one of their results. So I put it up there. It seemed interesting.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, it makes it, it makes sense.

Speaker 2:

It does. It does. So, um, and so actually the revenue is 62% more revenue, meaning 60% higher dollars are coming in and 3% more per order means that the actually buying more product or, or a different product or whatever. I believe that's how they've divided it out. I couldn't reach them on the phone to ask the question in time, but I'll look that up and get back with you on that because I don't like to,

Speaker 1:

yeah, I mean, I know, I, I think it's directionally accurate. You know, all of these things are pointing towards the fact that this is valuable. This is stuff that is good for you to do. Uh, whether it's 3% or 4% or 2% or whatever it is, it's, it's directionally good.

Speaker 2:

Right. Okay. So let's move on. So where do you use these testimonials and reviews? One of them is in social media. And what I've done is I've shown you FUBU, FUBU is, I'm that gentleman from shark tank that has the [inaudible], that online business and he's selling he, this is just a post, it's not really selling anything, but he's included the review. It's a five star review and also the quote, which is more of a testimonial. So yeah. Or reviews can be combined with a testimonial to look something like this. And um, you know, and his messages, Hey, you get music goes anywhere and read what this person just wrote. So maybe I might buy this rather than a Sony speaker or something simply because I've got the review there, but it looks really great as opposed and it's not really selling anything. It's really just telling you what somebody thinks of it. And I like that. I don't like to be sold to all the time.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. I like how that looks. So for the people who aren't watching, she's got a screenshot from a Facebook ad from FUBU, and it's a picture of a, I think that's a speaker, right? I'm pretty sure to go anywhere speaker. Yeah, it looks like a go, you know, portable, Bluetooth type of speaker. It looks pretty rugged and it's just a screenshot from a Facebook ad that you see on your phone or on your mobile device or on your uh, uh, computer and it says it's from FUBU. Do you want your music to go anywhere with you read what George V just wrote about FUBU tough. And then right under the picture of the actual image of the, uh, speaker, it's got five stars. So, so is it looking like they, they put those stars in there right into the actual copy of the ad?

Speaker 2:

Well, I think what they do with something like that is the third party review company gives you a plugin that will plug the review and you're not really supposed to make your own reviews up. This supposed to be based on something. So he may have something in his website that captures a testimonials and reviews and things like that. And then, you know, through a third party company and then it like goes right into the social media as a plugin.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. So they're, they're just basically, and then they just took George V's, uh, texts. You know, the speaker itself is just amazing. I've been using it for two months now. It works for perfection. I take it to the beach paddle boarding and whether it lands in the sand of the water, the FUBU tuff continues to do its job. I love the dot, dot, dot, dot. And so there, it's, it's just text really. And it's just from a guy named Jorge V.

Speaker 2:

right. But you know, the interesting thing is, is that if Jorge V had been a follower or had been somebody that they could have tagged, it would have gone to all his personal people as well. They could have been proved it that way. The other thing is, is that you always really want to have a full name because people can make up things. So depending on these reviews, a lot of the reviews, they don't put the last name in. But in testimonials, especially if they're on your website or if they're on something you've created for yourself, or you should have the last name on there, it's important. Or the name of the company because one of the things you want to do for these people is you want to recognize them so that people say, Oh, that's me. I love it when I see my name places.

Speaker 2:

I don't know. It's great. Yeah. So, okay, the next one is from the Fletcher method and you and I met through the Fletcher method. Yeah. Which was really great. And you were one of the best things to come out of the Fletcher method for me. And the fact that you, your office is only like a mile from where my office is. It makes it really nice for interacting and asking questions of each other and learning things from each other. But in Facebook they have an app highlighted, they have a little thing for reviews and you should encourage people to go to that page for the reviews and write reviews. And, um, so it gives you some interesting things that you can do. Four out of five people, um, based on the opinion of 10 people, they give you the rating and then do you recommend them?

Speaker 2:

Yes or no? And then, um, you know, they give you a way of understanding reviews a little bit better, but then we can read that. Um, Sergio w sedans recommends the Fletcher method and this was back in December of 2019 and he says, fast, easy and effective. Okay. Um, next one would be Cindy van Dyke recommends it and she says, I'm the best program I've used to help me grow my business. So one of the, one of the things that we're not seeing here, and I'm surprised because Aaron is a really, really great online marketer, is that, uh, any has people that can do it for him. When you have a review page, it's so great to be able to not just like that, but to put a comment there. So, um, he might have sent a comment and would've said, Sergio, thanks for thanks for your review.

Speaker 2:

Um, which is the feature that you like best, or which part of the program did you like best? And start an individual conversation. We're not talking about a lot of reviews, we're only talking 10 people here. So they're not coming in so fast that he can't respond to it. And when you respond on Facebook, when you respond on Instagram, when you respond on Twitter, when you respond on LinkedIn, the logarithm says, Oh, you really care about people. This platform is about people to people and they will promote you a little bit more. So I just wanted to mention that at this point that, you know, he's doing a great job. He's getting, he's getting, um, he's getting reviews that people are writing themselves and it's third party because it's Facebook. But the other thing is, is, and he's liking it. So he's showing that he's reading it, but he's not commenting on it. So that would be my suggestion to him. He's got so many great suggestions for my business, so I'm giving him one now.

Speaker 1:

It's a, it's a good one. And it's probably something that he's just overlooked. You know, he's, you get so focused on doing other things that it can be difficult too to do those types of things that the, the engagement stuff, you know, we can kind of get uh, sort of tunnel vision and just [inaudible] think that it's only one direction we're communicating outward to the world. But when they respond back to just take two seconds and leave it, leave a response on that is a, it's extremely valuable because it is creating that conversation. My question was when you, when you for, from what you've seen out there, you mentioned something about sort of the algorithm rewarding you for that type of engagement. Is that, is there any, you know, actual data on that or is that just kind of the consensus? I mean it makes sense to me, but

Speaker 2:

date the data changes Robert every day, you know, the consensus chain, the consensus is there that this is what it does. There is no actual reports because you can look at all these ways that people are interacting with these social media. And if you go to, let's say your email provider that's giving you this information or you go to, um, you'd go to one of these companies like B commerce and you get information from them, a lot of it's very conflicting. Basically what you're doing is you're saying, I don't care so much about the logarithm as much as I care about people. No, people are learning that I respond. People are learning that I care about them. And that's the one to one attitude as opposed to the one to many attitudes. And the other thing people can do is they can hire a virtual assistant very inexpensively.

Speaker 2:

Um, I have a friend, Nicole bandhas right here in, in Arizona and she has a virtual assistant company that will hire somebody out for you to do any of these types of projects that you want to do, like responding to Facebook things or um, you know, putting out LinkedIn messages or whatever. And it's, it's not that expensive. I mean, you think about, you know, paying 15 to $20 an hour and they can go through the page, you know, they can go through an entire, um, week or months worth of work and in one working day. So, you know, there's really no excuse not to be doing something like that.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. And you know, for my coaching program, we talk a lot about YouTube and I know I'm so bad about this, we have hundreds and hundreds of comments on our YouTube channel that I don't respond to. We just have not responded to them. And I know I've known for a very long time how, how dumb that is because you know, those people are, are, they're on your channel and they're probably just one little click away from the subscribe button and then they move on to the next video. But if you engage with them and bring them back, the likelihood that they're going to be repeat viewers and really help you grow your channel is going to increase exponentially. So I think it's great advice and hopefully Erin will listen and take you up on that.

Speaker 2:

Right. So the other thing I was going to say is you actually are very good at responding to your Facebook comments. Um, I've noticed that there's always a response very quickly to Facebook whenever I comment on something and when other people comments

Speaker 1:

cause I'm on there all the time. I'm on there too much. I gotta I gotta I gotta work. It's like the opposite. I need to take some of that energy and put it over to YouTube.

Speaker 2:

Right, right, right. So let's move on. And so here's LinkedIn and LinkedIn also has a recommendation section. And um, these are my recommendations from people I've done business with over the years and some of them are old and these, I took the older ones rather than the new ones because I just really, I liked the particular group of people that commented on this and um, you know, it, it's really nice to have it in there and people looking at your LinkedIn profile. And a lot of people use LinkedIn. So my husband is a mobile notary. We do, um, he does loan side. He's a certified loan signer. And he also does trust, trust documents. And estate documents for lawyers. And most lawyers really hang out for doing business on LinkedIn. We have found versus Facebook. So it's hard to find lawyers to communicate with seriously on Facebook.

Speaker 2:

But on LinkedIn we have Woolies really great discussions with, you know, five, 600 lawyers and they just, every time Brad sends something out, they just write him back frantically about what to do about this, what to do about that. I know I spoke to faith in your office and your office has notarizations that have to be done and you know, how are you going to get it done in this cobot environment? So LinkedIn is a great way if you're, um, if you're looking to sell to lawyers, it's a great way to communicate and establish those one-to-one relationships. And if, um, if you are, let's say you have a marketing firm and new market restaurants or whatever, restaurant managers as restaurant marketing managers, LinkedIn is a really great method, but when you put your recommendations down, it's great, but that's not the only place a recommendation on LinkedIn can go.

Speaker 2:

You can actually copy and paste the recommendation right into your about section. And you can sprinkle it true just like you could on a, on a webpage. So that halfway through reading, if people see that, um, you know, that, um, the, the particular photography or video that we do is on the cutting edge, you know, protect Goodwin or um, you know, the, the different things that I'm talking about in my about section could be, you know, testimonials about that too. And in addition to that, rather than being a resume type of profile in LinkedIn, you can have more of a, Hey, this is what we do, this is, um, this is how we do it. And you can sprinkle in testimonials there too. So LinkedIn is a whole nother area that I've become certified in recently and I really like it as, as, as a platform. It really has a lot of power, especially for one-to-one marketing. But the testimonials and the reviews are the key to getting results on it.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's good stuff. And you know, what I like about this here too is, is what you see here is it's more than then qualifications. It's, it speaks to your integrity and to your core and to the type of person you are. So, you know, traditionally a LinkedIn profile, it's like, it's all about what you do, but it's not about who you are as much. You know, it's, it's all sort of, you know, credentials and there's a meme that goes around, you know, that has the four pictures of what your Facebook profile looks like, what your Twitter profile looks like, what your LinkedIn profile looks like and what your dating app profile looks like. You know, and it's hilarious and it's the same picture of the same person but doing very different things. And you know, LinkedIn is very professional suit and tie. And I got my, I got this on, I've got all my credentials, I got my resume, I got my briefcase, I got my pen and I have all these things. And you know, when you, when you can bring in these testimonials, what you see is then talking about, you know, meeting expectations. And, and, uh, you know, innovating and all of these different things that you can't really communicate unless somebody else's communicating it for you.

Speaker 2:

Right. So the other thing with LinkedIn is it used to be very resume, very professional and everything. Now it's about not, it's not, let me try to put this the right way. It's not about me. It's about you. So who are you? Um, okay. So I do social media marketing. Who do I sell to? Photographers, leading photos, tours and workshops. I feel seat faster for you and get to profits quicker for you. So you know, everything is about the client and not necessarily about, I'm so aware by the way of this Cobits things with the face. You know, I'm watching us with the face thing and trying to keep my hands down. But, um, so it's very important that when you are working with LinkedIn that you take some of these new things on, that it's about you, my relationship with you, not about me because you can look up my resume, you can look up a lot of these things and it can be lower down on the LinkedIn page.

Speaker 2:

But when you get to the profile, you want to know immediately that Robert gorilla is a defense attorney who helps people in Scottsdale overcome traffic violations, right? So then the riches are in the niches as my mentor, John MIMO always says, and his book is called, but that's a whole nother set of, you know, discussions for another day. And anytime you're interested in LinkedIn, I'd be more than happy to share my, um, my information on LinkedIn with you and your viewers and you'll listen to it. Yeah. Okay. So the next thing is we could use them on websites. So on my particular website, I actually have, and this is before I came up with my whole new theory that you can like sprinkle things throughout the whole, um, website. So I had a page called testimonials and it makes it very clear to somebody that, and it's nothing wrong with this by the way, because it makes it very clear, this is where people are talking about me and how I do my business and what's happening with my business.

Speaker 2:

And I always use a on this, I'm using a picture because I think it's important for people to know who it is and what they look like when they're recommending you. So I've got, you know, my good friend who's a fashion instructor and an online course provider that I met through, um, a woman named Jeanine Blackwell, who taught me all about online courses and we've become friends. She's from Alabama and she became my client and I helped coach her. So, you know, she wrote me a testimonial. Um, my first photographer client was Jim Zuckerman. And so he wrote me a testimonial. And then, um, then I have this a friend over at PhotoBiz that's no longer with PhotoBiz, but he was the director of vendor relationships. And so he wrote me a testimonial. So you have a client that's not a photographer, but it's talking about my coaching, my one on one coaching of somebody who was a photographer who we designed the website and his newsletter with.

Speaker 2:

And you have somebody who I work with who gives, you know, who, who I buy from all recommending me. So that's what we use the, um, the website for. And again, you can sprinkle these throughout the website. Um, [inaudible] then we've got Fletcher's page and I use Fletcher only because we know each other and I like to use things that we know. And frankly his method was one of the best things to happen to me in terms of creating that, that signature solution with the nine and the nine blocks and the transformation. So the me, anytime I can show something of his, I'm very happy to do that. So he's got a, what he calls, reviews and it's probably coming in from, because it has the stars there. I'm sure it's coming in from some sort of a plugin or some sort of a review company that allows you to, um, record on a cell phone or recording.

Speaker 2:

Maybe he did this at one of his sessions where he did, it looks like it's at his house in San Diego where he does his sessions, but um, you know, it allows him to record these, um, these little video, um, testimonials and reviews. And it's very nice because you can see who these people are. They're all in different businesses. They all are telling Fletcher why he helped and everything. I'm not going to actually show any of these videos because I didn't get permission to show them, but I did get permission to put the page up. So I just really wanted to show this is how another, uh, instead of calling it testimonials and having individual things that I created, he's bringing in a third party with some of the reviews on that. And I, and I like the layout and it's very nice and you can keep adding new ones to it by moving it down depending on whatever web, what program you're using to develop your website. But I thought it was a very nice way of displaying testimonials.

Speaker 1:

It is, and it does look good. And you know, this is, uh, this is interesting and I'm curious what your thoughts are on this. I went to a, so I see here Fletcher has six of them and, uh, hats off to, to, uh, you know, to your point about Fletcher, he does a great job. I've learned a lot from him. I use his, his methodologies and a lot that we do around here. I went to a different, uh, workshop with [inaudible], obviously not Aaron Fletcher and they were talking about testimonials. And one guy, uh, had this, had this, uh, this landing page on their end. He had I think nine, nine to 12 different testimonials on there and what he found out, you know, so he was doing all of his analytics on that one page and he was, he was saying, well, you know, people really only ever clicked on the first three.

Speaker 1:

And then he started to realize that he, he spent a ton of time and effort, uh, on getting like nine to 12 different video testimonials when he probably could've gotten away with like three to six, maybe because it was just too many. You know, at some point you have to find the balance between, of course you want to convey that you're an authority figure and people love you and they've got amazing things to think about you but, but how much is too much? Right. And so I think that Fletcher here, six, that looks good. I think it's visually appealing. I think it kind of conveys the point that there's a lot of different types of people who are interested in what he's doing. And so I think, I think that's effective. What w? W. w what's your take on that in terms of

Speaker 2:

know? So it's very interesting you should talk about this because today in search engine watch I was reading the blog and they were talking about speed of websites and that how, how Google's analytic a logarithm if you have a slow website won't put you high in the rankings. So it really depends on where your video is, whether or not it's stored in a CDN. And I'm not going to get into all the technical terms of what you can do with video and pictures to shrink them down and everything. But the more you put up there, the more unnecessary things you put up there. And on some of these, and I both know from lead pages that you can like just have tons and tons of videos and, and all sorts of things. And if you put them into the page itself, embed them into, you can embed them and it's better than if you just do them raw type of thing and you just natively put them in because it slows everything down and then it doesn't get found.

Speaker 2:

The other thing is, is that you can take, you shouldn't just have a testimonial section on a landing page and even on a website. Uh, I think the theory now is to take, um, to take a M a testimonial and put it on the front page. Okay. Take a testimonial and put it into the about page to take a testimonial and put it onto the blog page so you know that every or onto the contact page, the contact page might have a testimonial about support. The main website, the main one might have a testimonial about how great the law firm did in, in, um, you know, in getting something removed from their license or, or whatever. So it's, um, it is something to look at. How many do I have, where are they mostly effective? And do people really only look at the first three?

Speaker 2:

Yes they do. But having them there makes them look at the first three. Yeah. You might have a list of 12, I think. I think 20 is too many. I think a, um, anywhere from three to nine would be the right amount to have depending on how you laid them out. I don't think another row of three would have hurt this. And for all I know I took a screenshot of this, so for all I know, the screenshot was actually had more down there that I didn't look at. Mmm. I can go back and check on that, but no, no, no. Yeah, I was just curious. Yeah. But it is, it's something that I get worried when I see too many testimonials on a page because I think you're trying to convert me. But then again, they said in the, um, big commerce site that if you have 50 or more reviews or 50 more testimonials that you're going to do that much more business.

Speaker 2:

Right. So I guess it really depends on, you're looking on Yelp where you're looking on a website. Yup. I think that's a good point. Okay. So you can also use testimonials in landing pages and emails. So what would I usually do when I do this? This was used to be on, um, a landing page for my video workshop, which also had a T. I couldn't find the testimonial from you, but I also had a testimonial from you that I had on that page and from a really nice woman from Chicago who I got to through HubSpot who gave me a testimonial. And basically what I do is I put the person's picture, I have a little bit of what they said with their name, and then I have the instructions to hear in her own words, describe the transformation so that people, it looks different than a regular testimonial. It's an action to take. It's, I'm watching the video, but if they don't want to watch the video or listen to the audio, they can just see something from this and get an idea of it. Yeah. So

Speaker 1:

this is a, this is a format that I use a lot. Yeah, I like that. And you were, you were mentioning some, some of, uh, the idea of, you know, having a fast page, I would imagine that this one's faster to load because it's not pulling in the actual video. You know, it's not having to load up the, the frame that hosts the video. This'll load very quickly. So, you know, this may be even be great for things like mobile. They boom, and if they want more action and they can go, yeah, you know what, I do want to see that video. Boom, click the video. And then now you've got somebody who's really engaged.

Speaker 2:

Right? I mean, you might want to put a, um, a gift there, but you know, I don't, I don't like things flashing around on my page, but that's my own personal branding and my own personal method. Nothing is right. Nothing is wrong. When it comes to branding, unless it like really doesn't, you know, follow some sort of a sequence or rules. So I think that people can feel very comfortable creating what they like and creating what their customers want. So it's not so much about what I like, it's about what my customers want and my customers really don't want to be watching a bunch of videos that start automatically on my page. Right. I got that comment a long time ago and I learned from it. Okay. So you can also use testimonials. You can create a YouTube, a Vimeo channel or a sub channel where you have testimonials.

Speaker 2:

And so you can see this is actually a law firm. Um, I think I've got this from one of Fletcher's, uh, testimonials and uh, yeah, it was from the Fletcher method and it talking about, you know, what this law firm did for them type of thing and what the Fletcher method did to help them. So it's a dual purpose. It talks about how the Fletcher method helped them and then it has a testimonial for the law firm in it as well. So I thought that was very interesting. And you can see again that, you know, he's got like 4,000, um, what thousand, um, subscribers and he only has one like on there and 139 views. And I think that's because he's not responding to comments on it. Again, I think that the more comments you have, the more it pops up yours, your videos pop up all the time. I mean, and people are always making comments on those.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, we have a lot of comments. I just don't, I haven't, I've been bad about responding to them, which is a big kind of focus of ours is a lot more of the engagement.

Speaker 2:

Right? And then there's a whole thing about YouTube and how to post to YouTube and what to put into your YouTube posting that goes underneath this. And so again, that's something that I teach my photographers and some of my clients. So, um, you know, if anyone's interested, we can certainly, you know, work for you or it's something that you need to work on as well for your hula method is how to optimize a YouTube page. Um, it, it's very important because it, it's as important as optimizing your webpage. Yeah,

Speaker 1:

I agree. I agree.

Speaker 2:

I learned that from, again, from your workshops. So, okay. And then, so how are we going to get these reviews? Because now we know how important they are and we know what they might look like, but how are we going to figure out what we're going to do about these testimonials? So you can look at places that have professional reviews, like Google, we looked at Facebook, do you have Twitter mentions? You have Yelp, you have Foursquare, you have TripAdvisor. I mean, I could, I could have made like a whole slide of things. So, and industries have their own, you know, um, one of the notary, um, one of the notary signing companies that my husband deals with has their whole review page and you know, for each of the notaries that they send out. So, you know, there's professional associations as well that have review page.

Speaker 2:

So what I want it to show on this slide was, um, more of a, um, just a review that I believe came off of. Mmm. It didn't come from Facebook. I believe it came from Yelp. I'm not 100% sure. Um, but in any case, basically what you're looking at is you have the review, you have the, um, the more button and you're able to click and read more if they have more. Now these are five, these are 4.4 at stars out of 42 reviews. That's pretty good. But we're not seeing whether or not the person is responding to them. And anytime you have a review, even more than you know, a testimonial on Facebook, you know, just in if somebody wrote, Oh, you know, I really like watch, watch the Watchers and whatnot. And you know, you could use that as a testimonial. Um, as opposed to review of somebody's going onto your Facebook page and actually revealing watch the Watchers.

Speaker 2:

But it's so important to make those comments. And then the bottom one is a Twitter. And what's so important about this particular Twitter one is when I'm looking for reviews, I'm looking for reviews that mentioned my company. In this case they're [inaudible], they're using Animoto, okay. And they have the hashtag. So when you have all this, well this in there, it's good information for putting into creating your review or your review or your, your testimonial video. Because in the end I'm going to be recommending video testimonials. Yeah. And so this just shows you where you're going to gather your stuff from. And then the other place you're going to gather your information from are you loyal customers who stand out. You're going to ask them for the testimonial. And it can be either a text like through an email, it could be audio, maybe they want to send you a message on your cell phone.

Speaker 2:

Maybe they want to do video on their cell phone or professional video with you and your studio. Or maybe it's a combination of all three. But basically what you're looking for are people who are constantly engaging you on social media, um, who are using your services, who are recommending your services. And these are the people you want to identify and ask these questions. So we have five basic questions we ask and I have a whole blog posts. I'm getting ready to write on this. And one is who are you and what do you do? So in your case, you would say to me, Hey Suzanne, who are you and what do you do? And I'd say, I am, you know, I'm, I'm a photography company, an online marketing company for photographers. And, um, how long have you been using our product or service? And I would say, you know, I wanted to get those three tickets removed from my license, you know, and you did a, that was like two years ago.

Speaker 2:

And then when my cousin, um, my cousin got a ticket, we recommended you type of thing. Yeah. And what was the problem? Well, the problem was I had these tickets and I didn't actually go through the red lights, uh, two red lights in a row on Lincoln, let's say. Um, and so I was looking to solve this problem and maybe the solution to the problem was having those red light cameras tested or whatever it is that you do as an attorney to get that removed. I have never run a red light. I just want you to know that, um, up to now and how has, how has our product or service helped you to solve this problem? And so I would then say, you know, you're able to get two out of the three off and I could go to traffic school and my insurance didn't go up as high as it really could have. So, you know, I would say that. And then why would you recommend us? And I'd say, because you know, you're so friendly and you understand human language, whereas I'm not listening to a lot of legal ease or whatever. And now you'd have the answer to these questions either verbally over Skype or video of a Skype or a video of a zoom or a video over a camera, uh, over a FaceTime or whatever. But you would get the answers to these questions and you would collect them along with what we were doing with social media.

Speaker 2:

The next thing is you have to organize all this content. Okay? So on the right hand side of the screen, we're looking at [inaudible] images and video and the things that we've collected from people, maybe their product photos, you know, whatever we were collecting images and video w w also on the right hand side, I have a worksheet that I'll be giving away to everybody. We are putting the quote from, from what the interview was or from the review, what the takeaway was. You know, that, you know, Robert's legal assistance really were there for me every time I made a phone call. You know, what, whatever was the takeaway, the reviewer would be Suzanne Feinberg and the source would be, um, Facebook or the source might be, um, you know, telephone call or whatever. And you would like keep all of these things in a file so that you would have all these ready to go when you were ready to make your testimonials and you take screenshots of the reviews that are left kind of throughout the web.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Let's go back two slides. Yeah. So I take the screenshots, okay. From Yelp or I take the screenshots from Twitter or from Facebook or I'm from ship advisor, which, um, know I was helping a company that did, um, private photography tours up at monument Valley and he had a huge number of TripAdvisor, five star reviews. And so I wanted him to get some of those reviews and some of those, his testimonials on his website with video. And so, you know, we went through and we gather all these, you know, these reviews and all these Twitter things and, and things with his hashtag on it. And it, it gives you an idea of where you're getting your most information from. Got it.

Speaker 2:

Okay. So what happens next? Very confusing. But what happens is, is that I then combine in a program like Canva or right into Animoto or some of the other programs I use, I combine the picture and I combine the words and I use any features and benefits they have to sort of [inaudible] the pictures a little bit. The, um, make it seem a little bit better, but these are very simple. These are a picture and a quote, a picture and a title. Okay. So let's see what this looks like. Mmm. Can I play a video? Yeah. Okay. Let's go lower the volume.

Speaker 2:

So very quick video, 30 seconds. This took the person less than five minutes to make because they had collected all their assets together and they used Animoto and it's really nice. It's just nice. Yeah. So just at the very end, they usually have a call to action. Yeah. Yeah. So, you know, that's, see, you'll have to excuse me. No, you're good. Yeah. I just got to get back to our, um, w I guess, let me get back to my keynote. Okay. So what makes this so good? Okay. It's a single, a multi customer video. It's about her business. It's about a real estate business. Okay. And in it, she has testimonials from multiple customers, but it could also be from just one customer. It's telling a story or a theme about as she takes the testimonials, she's actually telling the story with the testimonials about the different things she does.

Speaker 2:

She stages homes. She, um, she, you know, does magazine listings or whatever, you know, and through these testimonials you're seeing the story of what this Cindy Stewart actually does for the clients. So it's telling us story because it's organized and when you're organized, you can do it in that way. When you're not organized, you go, Oh my God, how am I going to do this? Uh, you know, this testimonial, it's got fast paced music, so it moves you through 30 seconds very quickly and the particular program has motion graphics and all you do is just type it in and you say, um, this is a start point. This is an end point. And it's got lots of still images. But if you're more advanced, you can even put a video in there. I mean, it's, nothing's preventing you from putting video in. It's just we want things simple for people to start with. It's branded to her business and her business colors and in her style, um, it's short 15 to 60 seconds. She created it in 10 minutes and it's very easy with this program, just share, post and embed this. So, however you want to do it, through email, through websites, through landing pages, through YouTube channels, it's very easy to share this again, maybe one hour of tutorials and you're up, you're up to speed on how to create something like this.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. And then you can create them. You can create them. The more and more you do, the more reps you get, the faster you can create them, the easier it gets.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. And they're all templates, you know, who cares that they're templates. They look great because they're in your colors, your branding, and it's your choices. Okay. Another type is a multi-client. So this is Alicia Strager and Alicia is a, um, fitness pro. And that's not a, that's not Alicia on here. That's her, her multiple clients that are giving, um, there, um, their, their opinions and everything. And let's see what this looks like. Whoops. Yeah. Pay job. Whoops. Paycheck. I thought I had a Lincoln here. Yes. So she's on Facebook watch. And Facebook watch is, um, a really great way to get information across to people. It's like television. You can have series like your watch the watches. She'd actually be Facebook watch if it's not. And you could see I have the volume turned off, but you can see these different people talking about the benefits of working with Alicia.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. And it's very effective and it's, it's so easy to make because people are just calling in on their phones and or Skype and she's recording it. Yeah, I like that. That looks cool. Okay. And again, it's a client video. So, um, she sure you would have one client or multiple clients. It's telling a story or a theme. So each one of these is put into an order that tells the particular story. There can be motion graphics in there and this particular one, there's not, you can have still images. You can close caption it because you know what, if you're putting this out on Facebook, people are watching on a phone and they usually have this sound off. So you want to do close captioning, um, you want to do, and you can use like rev.com or something like that. They use their Temi service per 10 cents a minute.

Speaker 2:

It's great. Um, you can do, um, random to your business. You know, with colors, you can custom color it. It's short, it's 30 to 60 seconds. You can create something with video in 15 minutes. I would say this is a little bit more advanced than the last one because you're dealing with the transitions from video. But the software makes it very easy to do this. Um, and then again, because this software is designed to share posts and, and bed instead of just host, you can host it there, but you can share poster in bed, put it out to YouTube channels to Vimeo, to Wistia. You can put it out in a whole range of places. It's really, really great type of, of testimonial to do. And it really, this type of a testimonial really engages, um, the viewer and create a sense of trust because you seeing all these people say something great about this trainer. Yeah. Hey, another type of video testimonial would be a product testimonial. So if you, um, have reviews from like reader's digest or Vogue or Arizona highway is, or you know, just ink magazine or whatever, you can take your, um, professional product stills and use them and use a quote or you can actually, um, create your own things with a cell phone or with a DSLR. And there are lists if you want to get more advanced with photography or even video. Let's take a look and see what this one looks like.

Speaker 2:

Again, music only and it just goes through [inaudible] and it's just a series of what their ads were and you know, pretty pictures. Yeah. And it moves very quickly.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. And they're not super long. They're, they're kind of short. That was like 20 seconds, so you can put it right on Facebook. It's going to capture somebody's very short attention span.

Speaker 2:

Right. And you don't even have to have captions on it because the captions are actually part of the picture. Yeah. It's telling a story. It's moving you through, um, that it's the best serum for boosting the hydration. The next benefit is the forerunner and skincare trends. You can have music when narration, um, for this particular product, I think music works better than narration. If you haven't that ration on a, on something like this, you don't need closed captioning because all the information is on the slides. Um, it's branded to the business and this business particularly cares for black and whites. So it's all in black and white. It's short. They created this in 20 minutes is a little more difficult because you have your pictures that you want to make sure are really, really look good because they're product pictures and not just, you know, pictures that people are just submitting to you.

Speaker 2:

Um, and it's easy to share poster and bed again with the same software. And then another one, and this is, I know this is a little gross, but it was the best before and after picture I could find its nose Impala, healing balm for dogs and a before and after is great because seeing is believing. And I first started using before and after pictures when Brad was doing architectural photography and million dollar homes where he, or $10 million homes where they were or they were a stage, none stage. And we had before and after pictures to show the realtors. So before and after is a very, very powerful method of doing something. Um,

Speaker 1:

yeah and I actually do this. I and I encourage other attorneys to do it. I hold up, I've got on our YouTube channel, I have a whole segment of results, case results. And on the camera I will hold up, uh, you know, here's my notes, but I'll hold up, um, a picture of the original ticket and I'll just go right up, super close to the camera on a hold the original ticket up there. And then I'll say, well this client, you know, they came to us, they had this problem. Look right here, it's got a DUI on there. Then I'll say, and they made a very smart decision. They decided to work with our firm. We're reputable, we work the case up for six months. Here's what we did. And then I show up the disposition document. So then I show the final document and I'll say, and look, you can see right here the same court, the same original charges, and now our client, you can see right by the, the the line item there, it says dismissed or it says reduced or whatever it is. And those are, those are short. They're about two to three minutes. But they're super effective. Our sales team absolutely loves them. They send them to all prospective clients and they say they just eat him up.

Speaker 2:

It'd be really cool and I know these privacy laws and everything like that, but it'd be really cool to be able to have somebody say, wow, this really helped me, you know, at the end or whatever. You know, just some real powerful statement. But I know there's a lot of 'em, you know, people want to be private about those types of things. I know you probably black out the names and things like that.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. And we do, we block out everything and data violations and all that stuff. And of course it's in our fee agreement that, you know, if they, if they decide to work with our firm, they give us permission to do that type of stuff. So, you know, we are, we are putting some thought into the legal side of it, but, uh, but I guess that's a good, a good point to ask you a question that I had written down. You know, the, the ask, in other words, how do you ask people to go and leave these things, you know, what, what are your thoughts on the most effective way to do that? Because we kind of picked it up with you saying, yeah, let's go around and let's find, you know, different reviews on Yelp and Facebook and you can scour the internet forum. You got to ask for him, right? You gotta you gotta get, get them first.

Speaker 2:

Okay. So let's go back to you and I, right?

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

What did I do? I said to you, you know, Robert, can you help me with making a video where you talk about the power of video or you talk about how great this workshop will be for somebody. Or then you said to me, Suzanne, can you do this for me? Type of thing. So it's very easy to ask because you're not selling anything. What you're doing is you're sort of confirming to the person you're reaffirming with the person, the great results they had from you. First of all, because you're not going to go to somebody who had bad results. Right? The next thing I might do, and let's just say it's for, um, let's just say it's a fitness trainer and they want to go out to their clientele and they can say, you know, I've got a great Instagram channel. I really love to promote the results that you know, that we saw together.

Speaker 2:

And, um, would you mind very much if I asked you some questions and we used it to put together a little video about, you know, how I get somebody transformed from, you know, being 140 pounds and no muscle to 150 pounds and really, or 140 pounds and really built up or whatever. And you know, when you, when you put it in a way that you're not selling something, you're not trying to gain anything else from them, but you really want to show the world, you know, what you've done and what they've done because it's not just about what you're doing, it's about what they're doing and they're highlighting their results. So with a fitness trainer, I might appeal, does somebody vanity that they want to be on Instagram or they want to be on Facebook or whatever where they want to be on your website?

Speaker 2:

If it was for a product like dog food or a dog Walker, I have a friend who her only business is professional pet, you know, the professional pet business for individual people who do, individuals who do dog walking or pet sitting or grooming or whatever. That's her specialty. And so she might, she might, let's say go to the groomer who Mmm. Who she did coaching with on how to get more poodles or whatever, how to get, you know, more people. And she might say, you know, we did really good results with this and, and I would love to be able to tell people how I did this and I'm going to be writing a blog. And in that blog I'd like to use a couple of quotes from you. Yeah. Would you mind answering these five questions for me? So it's how you approach people and it's your mindset. That's the big word right now I guess. Um,

Speaker 2:

this guy malts is a big mindset guy out there and he has a whole book on mindset. And I again, today was looking at a webinar where they were talking about the mindset and get out of this mindset of, you know, I'm selling, selling, selling too. I'm helping you and these are the results and the transformation you're going to see. So once you get out of that selling mode and more in, and that's also about, you know, bringing that person through the customer advocates. Because maybe, maybe you touch to the door, maybe you haven't talked to that dog groomer in, you know, four months and maybe the dog room has another problem that came up. And at the end of the conversation they say, by the way, I'm thinking about opening up another store where, you know, can you help me determine, you know, what services I need to, to offer in that zip code or whatever.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah, that's good advice. And, and it is, I think it's kind of a hang up. I mean, for me personally, I don't like to ask people to do something. I don't know why. I think it is a mindset problem. It's this idea, you know, I don't, we don't want to go ask our clients to leave a review or, or leave a testimonial for some, for some reason it's just kind of a, you know, it's kind of in our culture. You know, we, we, we feel like, you know, they hired us to perform a service. We perform the service and we're square. So now we're going in. We're asking them to, you know, to do something additional. And, um, it's just been something that has been, you know, a little bit uncomfortable. It was at the beginning, you know, certainly uncomfortable for us, but now it's just part of our process. We've built it into our system. When we get a good result, we're super proud of it. They're proud of it. And we've just said, you know, we're excited that we helped you. Can you help us just leave us this quick review or leave us a testimonial, give us some additional words. We, we've even had our attorneys take their cell phones and record video testimonials right outside of the courtroom. You know, walk out

Speaker 2:

because you've got them when they're there. At the happiest. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. They're thrilled. They got no problem doing it. They're kind of a little bit captive because our attorney standing there right there with them, you know, and they're saying, Hey, you know, we're super excited about it. Let's use this energy and just record a quick 32nd video and it's, and it's been good for us.

Speaker 2:

Right. So, you know, another way of looking at it is doing a survey. So, um, this whole net promoter score thing is a really good way to introduce a survey. So the net promoter score has, um, has basically three things that you're looking for in it, you know, a rating on a scale of one to 10. And then usually, um, you know, one or two questions that go along with it. [inaudible] if you look at it as a survey and you give a survey to each of your clients and they expect that going in, um, and you can say whether we're successful or not with your case and we expect to be successful, you know, that's our goal. Uh, we need you to fill in this survey at the end so that we can learn from it. And so that we can help. Mmm. Help other people better.

Speaker 2:

And then at the survey would include the legal ease about, you know, being able to be used like one or two statements from it or whatever. Yeah. Yeah. So I find that surveys are really, when somebody answers a survey, um, I get surveys all the time from my vendors and they always say if you will, you know, if you want to leave your email address and have, you know, make a statement, you can do a testimonial hero. They always tack something onto the survey. And so surveys are very good ways of collecting information. And I think just asking, I'm, you know, nowadays people like that one-on-one asking because it's more interactive and, and especially now when we're all isolated, just having somebody to talk to about something, I would think it would be a lot easier to talk to people who want to sort of like get away from teaching the kids homeschooling or from, you know, having to clean the house all the time because the house cleaner can't come or, you know, whatever it is. And this self isolation, we have a little bit more time to talk. It's a great time to be collecting information.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. And it is, and people have this, this desire to be helpful and to be useful right now in particular, right. You were talking about this April 3rd, we're right in the middle of the coronavirus Cova 19 pandemic and everybody's trying to figure out how they can help. You know, I've see a lot of people on social media who were doing these um, uh, you know, support small business types of drives and they'll promote a small business every day or they'll post [inaudible] post a screenshot of, of, of something that they're doing, ordering food or whatever it is. Everybody wants to be helpful. And you know, you were talking about this idea of mindset and there was a, there's a another guy that I follow who put it very, very interestingly. He said there are opportunities in life to use what he calls a fake because so, you know, you're, you're saying you're going to do something because of something else.

Speaker 1:

It's not really real, but it's a great excuse. So he calls it a fake because, and Covent 19 in the Corona 19, a Corona virus is something where you can easily kind of do that and say, look, business is really slow. Uh, courts are closed, everything is, is kind of, you know, coming to a crawl. I really am going to use this time to increase my business. One way that you can help me do that without buying my product is just leave me a review because of this coronavirus stuff. So could you help us, you know, could you help a guy out? And that's kind of you're in. If you're already not doing this, this is a great time to get, you know, get a robust system in place.

Speaker 2:

It is, it is. So our final one is, um, is a, um, one word style is what I call it. And basically this was, this is a Broadway show called a raisin in the sun or it's a movie. I didn't look at the ads that carefully, but I think it's the Broadway show that they're advertising and they've got their reviews successful from Asbury park press radiant, the star ledger. You, you see it all the time in these, in these ads. So why not create a video like that with, you know, with these information, it's short and sweet. It's very heavily branded. Um, for the, for the, for the product, the service or the, or the business, very simple images. I mean this thing takes maybe, you know, five minutes to make something like this. Um, it's got relevant music. So in this case, the music is from the, um, the show and it doesn't have to be, it could be something else.

Speaker 2:

It could be narration, but the simpler the better. Um, it's got motion graphics. So this radiant sort of slides in or the Asbury park press slides in it short and again, easy to share poster in bed. And so there are a lot of people who, I have one word type of things that they can put in there and it's, it's great, you know, especially for products and whatever. Like it works. It doesn't have to be one word. It can be is it worked for me or something and just have the name there. So this is, this is a really great, easy thing to do. And what I really wanted to do was show some really easy types of video because video creates that also, the testimonial creates the trust and the video creates the trust.

Speaker 1:

Yes. As you know, I am a huge, huge proponent of video. That's basically all that we do. Over 450 something videos on, on YouTube. We have a live show, we have a podcast, we do media is where it's at. But this is a great way. I mean, all of those examples were awesome and this is an easy way for people to, who are maybe not, uh, not thrilled about jumping into video, but do have some testimonials. Want to start playing around with some editing or even have somebody in your office who's good at that stuff.

Speaker 2:

We do this for people and we charge, you know, between 100 and $500 per per video that we create. And I'm really doing it as a service to lazy people because there's no reason why

Speaker 2:

anybody couldn't do this. I mean, you do not have to be an artist to do this. You don't have to be a video person to do this. Maybe place, you know, when you're putting it on a landing page, when you're putting it in a website, you might need somebody who is managing your web, you know, your webpages for you to do that, to make those changes. And everything, but if you are just putting things out on social media or are you just putting things into a YouTube channel, you can do this yourself and you will see a difference immediately in the responses that you get from people.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I completely agree with that. It's so funny. You know, you were at the griller method, workshop law for marketing mastery and another friend of mine, Tim was there and he's a non lawyer and he was just there, uh, because I just, he's a friend of mine, you know, and I just said, Hey man, you should come do this stuff, uh, for your business. And, and I, I just, you know, got him a ticket and there he was and, and he just, he didn't even really believe in it, you know, he's like, I just don't really get it. He's like, you know, video. He's like, nobody watches, I hate video. He came to the workshop and he, he, he came into my office the next day and he brought his laptop and we edited a video for him really quickly and we put it, we put it on the internet and it was content he already created.

Speaker 1:

He had it just sitting on a hard drive somewhere. And, uh, he called me or sent me a text the next day and he's like, dude, like 250 people have watched that video. I just posted it last night. And he was like shocked by it. I'm like, yeah, dude, I'm telling you, like we're not, I'm not just making this stuff up. Absolutely. Yeah. In a works. And so it's like these little things, a little 15 second video, 22nd videos with some consistency, with some purpose, with some methodology behind it. You crank one out a week, you crank, you know, five, six out a month and you know, a year later you have all of these assets. And that's what I wanted to really kind of, uh, you know, hit hit home with you is that, you know, you're, you're creating these things and you get to own them. You can put them in your, in your, uh, marketing software and your legal, you know, drip campaigns. These are, these are Instagram posts, Facebook posts, LinkedIn posts, and you can recycle them and create a content calendar. And this is something that, you know, can, can make your law firm and your small business independent of the major advertising providers. You know, I, I say this all the time. When you're advertising on a billboard, as soon as you stop paying money for that, it comes down. Somebody else goes up, somebody else's goes up. But with all of these things

Speaker 2:

that you're creating with videos and testimonials and reviews and blogs and you know, all [inaudible] courses and all this different stuff, you own that stuff and you can continue to continue to promote it in a way that you can't with some of that old kind of legacy media, uh, endeavors. But the really great thing about the assets, um, is that you can actually reuse them with different words, the descriptions in different ads, they're reusable over and over and over again, especially if they're popular. So there's a whole thing on Pinterest about refreshing pins. A lot of people use Pinterest that have brick and mortar stores or who have businesses that involve crafts or creatives of things, but it's also one of the largest search engines on the market after pickle. But [inaudible] it's so important. And you mentioned content calendars and originally when we first talked about the podcast, we were going to talk about a content calendar.

Speaker 2:

This is a really good time to create a content calendar. And if you search on con, you know, social media content calendars, there are a lot of free things out there from um, from like for instance, if you are registered to get emails from different vendors like a Weber or active campaign on email, or maybe you're with meet Edgar or HootSweet or you're with Angela Ganzola who is a social media guru or you're using Animoto. They all or wave video just came out with a new content calendar. And I have a guy who, um, is out of Eastern Europe and basically he makes a video content calendar and he color codes the buyer's journey. And then the videos that he's producing have those color-code dots, you know, on the content calendar. So he knows at any given day what videos are going out and what part of the buyer's journey they address because you want to address different things at different points in the [inaudible] while you're sitting. And we didn't get into that. I mean it's, it's already an hour and you, yeah. Did you so much stuff out there?

Speaker 1:

I know we could talk for days and typically when we get together we do, we can just spiral off. Did you hear about that? Did you hear about that? Did you hear about that? But, but you know, I think, I think this is, this is a pretty important part of your, uh, your, your law firm or your small business because you know, when you started this presentation you really hit hit, I think the nail on the head when you were talking about how impactful these types of of, uh, assets can be when you're talking about conversion rates and tendency to buy. It's extremely powerful. You were talking about the difference between a, you know, a personal recommendation and reviews and that is, it's almost the same. And I can attest to that. I mean there are times when somebody will recommend me something and I'll look it up and it's got terrible reviews and I'm like, no, I'm not going to do that. I trust the internet more than I trust this Yahoo. So you know, it is effective and it can be, it can be very useful. And you've been a very educational today. We appreciate that.

Speaker 2:

Thank you. I just wanted to thank Animoto and Lucas Coyne who is the social media manager for allowing me to use their worksheet, the content, the images, and the videos for the podcast. Um, they were very kind. I happen to be an affiliate partner with them. Uh, I'm not trying to sell Animoto, but it's a great trial. I've put the, the link to the, um, to the website at HTTP and it's actually S I'll correct the slide for you, Robert, but it's HTTPS colon slash slash S, H, R S l.com, forward slash two seven nine six G and if you use the code pro 15, they'll give you a 15% discount. And if you show me a copy of receipt by April 15th, I'll give you a free hour. Get up and running started and your first video will be done by the end of the private lesson. And, um, I'm, I'm not doing this so much to sell the affiliate income because it's very little on each sale.

Speaker 2:

It's really, it's a product that's very, very affordable to do this with, especially if you're going to be producing [inaudible], you know, monthly content. Oh yeah. For all different things. And it's good for everything. Not just testimonials. I mean, any type of video you want to make and they have, what I love about them is their templates and things. And then if you don't want to use something like Animoto when you want to do, um, you want to do something with another program, you might want to look at Canva. And Campbell will allow you to make templates for a PowerPoint of keynote or Google, Google docs type of a, a Google presentation or sheets, I guess the call. Um, they will allow you to, um, to create those in Canva. So they're very creative, very branded. And then you can just go ahead and load them up and make a little video, um, out of your, um, or your slide show and use a lot of the same things with that.

Speaker 2:

And that's, that's a free, you know, that's, they have free Canva and they have free Google, you know, free Google, uh Oh plate slides and things like that. So, and there's so many things out there to do this with, but my suggestion is you start small, you pick one type of thing, you do it, you do it successfully, you put it somewhere and then you say, okay, I want to produce content and then start gathering this. But just try it. It's fun. It's a free trial. I think it's 14 days on Animoto is a free trial and canvas free. The free version is just as good as the paid version and the um, and the Google, you know, or the, or the keynote or the PowerPoint and you can make a video out of them very easily. Yeah. We use the heck out of Canva.

Speaker 2:

I know faith is a huge fan of that have not discussed Animoto, had not even heard of it. So, Oh, it's my favorite program. I've been with them since the day they opened. I was one of their first clients, um, because they were originally for photographers. But doing like wedding photography, video slideshows, they, they compete on the, um, on, um, a program they compete with is called Camtasia and prose. Right. And then more on the, on the PC side of things, um, Canva really, uh, Animoto really has a lock on, on 'em [inaudible] on the Macintosh side. The other thing I was going to suggest is that, um, in terms of product is it, if you don't want to use Canva and you want to use something brand new, I met a woman who started a company called easel, E, S I L. and they're out of Australia.

Speaker 2:

It's just like Campbell, but they have more video options in it. And that's a page for pro. They have a free, they have a free version, but the free version doesn't have as many features and benefits as the free version of Canva. And one of the things I love about Canva and people don't really know this. I'm just going to come out of this and I'm going to just go in real quickly, Mmm. To Canva and with only to look at the design school and they actually have these really great, um, branding and presenting and um, you know, they just have all these courses for you to take designing with Canva and yeah, it's, it's really, to me, an incredible program to work with. Um, easel is basically the same thing except there's fewer templates and fewer, um, things to do, um, with it. But it's getting there. It's, it's brand new on the market. I, I met the people at social media marketing world and the other, the other video program that's getting really big for doing a lot of this is wave [inaudible] dot com and um, I don't know that much about them except that they're very popular now because they interface very nicely with social media on a native basis.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's great. There, there are so many tools out there. I think the big takeaway is you gotta just use them. You got to pick one, use it and start creating that content and then that's gonna really, really help you, you know, uh, Slingshot your from your business into the next level because it will come back, right. Everything is kind of stagnant and close and on pause right now. But when it comes back, I have a suspicion that it's going to come back with a roar. And if you, if you use this next 30 days or 60 days or whatever to learn some of these skillsets and begin incorporating them into your business, you're going to be that much ahead, further ahead of the next person. So, uh, Suzanne, where can people connect with you otherwise? So you know we've got, we've got the link, we're going to put all that in the show notes, but what are some other places where they can follow you, reach out to you?

Speaker 2:

I am, I am on Facebook. Um, I'm just Suzanne Feinberg and I also have a business page called power vision three 60 that they can look up. I am on LinkedIn. I am on Twitter. I'm not sure my Twitter handle cause I just joined Twitter for the first time.

Speaker 1:

Welcome. Congratulations.

Speaker 2:

I'm on. I just got onto Instagram also. So you know, if you search for power, vision three 60, I think we're listed as power vision three 60 or power three 60. I my Twitter handle is at power three 60. Um, and I just, uh, you know, the easiest way to reach me is through the contact page on my website and I'm very responsive to people and just totally what it is. Your problem is and I'll be glad to give you some great places to go to for free information as well as how I can help you.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and you are a huge help, Suzanne. I've, I've sent you a know a number of emails asking you about your opinion on software or different techniques or what do you like about that or dislike about that and you've been very helpful and very generous with your time with me and with the audience here. You know, this, this presentation was, was super cool and I know you put a lot of time into it and had a lot of very valuable information. So I want to thank you for, for giving your time to us here today and I will absolutely encourage people to check out Animoto. I know, I'm going to look at it. Uh, actually I had already pulled it up and uh, and, and you know, of course connect with the right power vision three 60 is the name of your organization.

Speaker 2:

Right. And one more thing I'm going to ask you is because I was like a little late getting everything together. Um, you'll be sending out the information to the people that were registered to come to the podcast. So I will get all that to you, including the actual links and everything. But if people could just use the affiliate, that would be very helpful for helping me put out while these, I use that money to put together, well the free things that I do for people. Yeah. Basically what I do. Yeah. And it doesn't, it doesn't cost anybody anything. And they just, yeah, I've got this discount code pro 15 that, you know, you only have, if you're an affiliate, you don't get it if you're, you know, just going to the website regularly and things like that. And then I always put anybody that buys any of my affiliates be at lead pages or Animoto or Canva or, or any of the many ones that I do. I always give, like I give like a one hour lesson and sometimes I do like a monthly lesson where you can just come in and sit on the webinar if you're interested in learning about branding or if you're interested in learning about design or if you're interested in learning about, you know, Facebook or Instagram, you know, or just my thoughts on, you know, what's happening in the industry.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. Yeah. Well that's great. You're, you're a very valuable resource. I would certainly encourage people to connect with you. Uh, I love speaking with you. What we could, we could go on for days and days and days, but unfortunately we have to end it. And so Suzanne Feinberg, power vision three 60 thank you so much for being here today, Suzanne. Take care. Bye bye. Bye.