Gruler Nation Podcast

Episode #90: Chad Schaub, Co- Founder of Bighorn Law

February 24, 2020
Gruler Nation Podcast
Episode #90: Chad Schaub, Co- Founder of Bighorn Law
Chapters
Gruler Nation Podcast
Episode #90: Chad Schaub, Co- Founder of Bighorn Law
Feb 24, 2020
Robert F. Gruler Jr., Esq.

Today on Gruler Nation I had the pleasure of speaking with Chad Schaub the co- founder of Bighorn Law, a personal injury firm located here in Arizona as well as in Nevada and Utah. Chad manages the Arizona team and is very passionate about his career.  

 

Before Chad became a PI attorney he worked for an insurance company and learned quickly that most insurance companies don't have the clients best interest in mind. Chad hated this side of the business because he truly wanted to help others. Chad realized that as a personal injury attorney he would be able to work on the other side and help clients reach a fair settlement that they deserve.    

 

Make sure to keep Chad's contact information handy! Give his firm a follow on Instagram @bighornlawaz or head over to www.bighornlaw.com to learn more about Chad's firm.  

 

#personalinjury #bighornlaw #arizona #attorney #lawyer #accident #insurance #insurancecompany #settlement #podcast #InspirationwithGrulerNation #inspire #gruler #inspiration #GrulerNation #GrulerNationPodcast #gnp #arizonapodcast #scottsdale #yesphx #phx  

 

The Gruler Nation Podcast is a show that focuses on conversations with interesting "Level 10" people passionate about changing the world with their work, relationships and ideas. The show is hosted by Robert Gruler, an attorney and founding partner of the R&R Law Group, a criminal defense law firm based in Scottsdale, Arizona focused on helping good people charged with crimes move forward with their lives.   

 

Interested in being on the show or have a guest recommendation? Email Robert directly at robert@rrlawaz.com or visit www.robgruler.com for more information.  

 

Show Notes Transcript

Today on Gruler Nation I had the pleasure of speaking with Chad Schaub the co- founder of Bighorn Law, a personal injury firm located here in Arizona as well as in Nevada and Utah. Chad manages the Arizona team and is very passionate about his career.  

 

Before Chad became a PI attorney he worked for an insurance company and learned quickly that most insurance companies don't have the clients best interest in mind. Chad hated this side of the business because he truly wanted to help others. Chad realized that as a personal injury attorney he would be able to work on the other side and help clients reach a fair settlement that they deserve.    

 

Make sure to keep Chad's contact information handy! Give his firm a follow on Instagram @bighornlawaz or head over to www.bighornlaw.com to learn more about Chad's firm.  

 

#personalinjury #bighornlaw #arizona #attorney #lawyer #accident #insurance #insurancecompany #settlement #podcast #InspirationwithGrulerNation #inspire #gruler #inspiration #GrulerNation #GrulerNationPodcast #gnp #arizonapodcast #scottsdale #yesphx #phx  

 

The Gruler Nation Podcast is a show that focuses on conversations with interesting "Level 10" people passionate about changing the world with their work, relationships and ideas. The show is hosted by Robert Gruler, an attorney and founding partner of the R&R Law Group, a criminal defense law firm based in Scottsdale, Arizona focused on helping good people charged with crimes move forward with their lives.   

 

Interested in being on the show or have a guest recommendation? Email Robert directly at robert@rrlawaz.com or visit www.robgruler.com for more information.  

 

Support the show (https://www.ericshouse.org/donate/)

Speaker 1:
0:00
Yeah.
Speaker 2:
0:01
This is episode 90 of the ruler nation podcast. My name is Robert ruler, joined today by Chad Shab of big horn logs, the cofounder of big horn. They are a personal injury law firm. They're in Arizona, Nevada, Utah. They're all over the place. We're super excited to have Chad in our studio this morning. Chad, thanks for being here today. Hey, thanks for having me. So personal injury law is one of those, is
Speaker 1:
0:26
that that I think people have sort of a perception of what it is, what it means. They see the billboards, they see the bus ads and stuff. But can you kind of give us an overview of what, what it is, what you do at big horn? Yeah. Personal injury is pretty much anytime anybody's injured and you need to be compensated for it, you're going to give me a call. Yeah. Um, you know, it's, over the years things have increasingly become more and more difficult to deal with an insurance company on your own. Um, they've hired teams of attorneys to modify their processes and try to pay as little as possible to the, to the normal average Joe. Um, so handling your case on your own, you're, you're going to have trouble. And so it's more and more. Um, it's really, I would say required. You really need to have an attorney to go up against the attorneys at the insurance companies.
Speaker 1:
1:17
Yeah. And that makes a lot of sense. But it's weird, I think kind of instinctually, a lot of people don't recognize that because they think, Oh, OK, I, you know, I've got insurance, I get into a car accident. It's my insurance company. They're supposed to care about. Yeah, they're supposed to pay me what I'm, what I'm owed. And so why would I even think about hiring a lawyer? Oh, I hear that every single day. I mean, folks are just naive to the fact that this is a big corporation that is making money hand over fist and uh, you know, it's at your expense. If you're injured, you're the one that's suffering. They're going to make money on you by you just thinking they're going to do the right thing. They don't do the right thing. They do what's right for them, but not right for you. And so you got to have an attorney anymore going up against them because they're attorneys, they know what they're doing.
Speaker 1:
2:10
They're ready to, to do whatever they have to do to keep as much money as possible. And it's all at your expense. Yeah. Yeah. And we know exactly how much money they're making because we see them everywhere. Right. I mean, every time you turn on TV it's like, it's like a pharmaceutical commercial, a beer commercial, and an insurance company. It's one of the, you know, it's one of those three. They're always trying to sell you insurance. They're doing a lot of advertising because there's big, big dollars. They're big dollars. So what, what are people sort of missing when, when they're going through this internal dialogue, they say, Hey, you know, I was just in a car accident. It makes sense to me. I'll just call my guy and I'll figure out why. You know what it is? I've got some neck pain, I've got some back pain.
Speaker 1:
2:51
Kind of walk me through maybe what they would would be getting if they didn't go through a lawyer and then maybe some of the value adds that an attorney can provide. Yeah. Well, let me back up a little bit on my personal history. So before I went to law school, I actually worked for one of the large insurance companies for about five years. And, um, I learned a lot while I worked there. One of the things that I learned is that the agent that everybody has contact with, you know, the person you buy your insurance from that you know, is your family friend or maybe your parents had a policy with them or you've had a policy with them for 10, 20 years, whatever it might be. Um, you know, that person's really nice and that person has all the best intentions in the world, but that person ultimately has no power over what happens with your insurance or your coverages.
Speaker 1:
3:41
They simply sell the policy to you and then it's over. Um, you know, and that was really hard for me when I worked for the insurance company because, you know, I was in the sales part of it and you know, you build these relationships with folks and you sell them, they're homeowners, they're S, they're auto, you know, whatever it is. And you know, they have a claim and they call you first and they say, Hey, you know, I need help with this. Um, you know, I had a fire, this got stolen, you know, help me out. So what you have to do as the agent is you then transfer those people to the adjusters to file the claim and then it's out of your hands, you know, as the, as the agents selling the policy and the adjuster takes over and then they start looking at all the exclusions, you know, what is not included as a part of your contract, what can they get, how can they get out of pain?
Speaker 1:
4:29
This claim. That's how they look at every case. And it was really frustrating to me, you know, cause then people would call me and say, Hey, you know, the adjuster just said, I don't have a claim or the adjuster said my claim isn't in enough, or Hey, it's not covered because it's excluded. Um, I hated that part of it. Right. That's part of the reason I got out of it because I just had no control out of actually helping these people. And so that's how it works. Once that person, that initial, you know, face of the insurance company, it gets past them. When you have to use the claim, then you're going to these adjusters and they're trained professionals to, they'll be your friend, they'll, they'll, you know, they know how to talk to people. They're there, they're really charismatic and know how to talk to you and gain your trust.
Speaker 1:
5:14
Um, you know, and then that when, when you start asking for things, Hey, I need to get these medical bills paid. Hey, what am I getting? I'm missing all this work. How am I going to pay for this? It's at that point in time to where they start putting up the, putting up the shield and saying, Oh, you know what, um, we're not gonna be able to help out with that. Or that's something that's not covered. And then before you know it, they're just not answering their phone calls anymore. And then it's been two, three months. Um, you know, where you haven't had a car or ya, you had all this treatment, you have these bills coming due and they're not paying them. And it makes it hard, you know, at that point in time, if you call an attorney that's three months already into the case, um, and it, and it takes a lot longer than for the attorney to able to do everything that they need to do to fix it.
Speaker 1:
6:00
Um, but if we get on the case right away that, that, that stuff's happening right away, we're making sure they're doing the right thing because there's certain laws in place that do protect the consumer. Um, there's bad faith, uh, laws that allow attorneys or you know, consumers to go after these insurance companies if they don't do the right thing. And a lot of them don't. Yeah. And a lot, a lot of, I don't have a lot of experience in personal injury. You know, we do criminal law and from time to time we'll, we'll have people call in and the feedback that I've gotten from people who have been in an accident or who are dealing with adjusters is that they will sort of hurry you to settle your claim. So you're in a car accident and you know, yeah, your neck hurts. The first thing you want to do of course, is, you know, call and tell your insurance company or that's what they're told.
Speaker 1:
6:50
Is that the right thing to do? So they call and they say, yeah, we'll get your car fixed. Uh, you know, and, and, and we'll, we'll close your claim as quickly as possible. In other words, we'll get this settled and taken care of. But then a week or two goes by and the person goes, you know what? Now my neck starting to hurt my back starting to hurt. But if their claims close, they may not have the ability to go get additional care or they may not know better. And so these longterm medical problems can, can reveal themselves much later down the road and then at that point in time, they may have inadvertently cut himself off from compensation for the treatment that they should have gotten. Yeah, exactly. Um, and that's a big problem. Um, you know, one of the, there's three tact incident tactics that insurance companies use.
Speaker 1:
7:33
It's delayed denying, defend. That's what they're doing against you. And delay would be the example that you're, you're explaining right now. I mean, a lot of people don't have insurance. Yeah. How am I gonna pay to go to a doctor? I mean, people can't afford that. Right. Um, you know, an insurance companies will just lead people on and say, hell yeah, you'll be fine. You know, it'll go away. This happens, Nora, you know, this is normal and you'll just believe that the agent or the adjuster on the other end and, and not get treatment. Well, the problem you run into then is three, four weeks down the road where you can't bear the pain anymore. Maybe you go to the ER or maybe you finally get into the doctor and you find out your injuries are actually severe. Well, we've got a four week gap of no, um, no medical attention.
Speaker 1:
8:21
And so then what the insurance company's going to do is use that against you. They're going to say, Oh, well it must've been from something else because if you were injured from this accident, you would have gone in right away, right? They sit. That happens all the time, you know, and then you have this normal person that just wants to do the right thing and Hey look, I don't need to go to the doctor. I'll heal up from this. You just try to be tough, right? That's the worst thing you can do in a case like this because the insurance company is going to use it against you. I mean, you have, I've had clients who waited days to go into the doctor who had backs
Speaker 3:
8:57
days, right? You think, how can someone bear to go to work and carry on their day to day activities with a broken back? But they do because people are just tough. Right? And insurance companies will use that against you. It's, it's super and it's unfortunate. Yeah, I can, I can understand that. And you know, you, you want to, people want to be tough. They don't want to go and get unnecessary treatment and right after an accident you may feel okay, you know, you, you kinda got your adrenaline pumping, your body's sort of in that, you know, that fight response. So you're getting all those endorphins, those, those pain, you know, dulling, uh, chemicals, your body releases. And so your body's hardened for a couple of days and you may want to think, well, yeah, it will go away. I've had a sprained a whatever before. It just goes away. Not a big deal.
Speaker 3:
9:43
But like you said, that's very interesting point that, that then when it does become necessary, now you've kind of dug yourself into a big hole. That can be, yeah, it could be too late. So best thing to do, get in, get checked out immediately. I mean, it doesn't hurt to go to the primary care doctor and say, Hey, my neck is hurting. Yeah. Um, and even if the doctor says, Hey, here's some pain meds, um, at least you have a document in the doctor's medical records that says patient complained of neck pain from an automobile accident. Right. That helps me so that three weeks down the road when you can't bear the pain anymore, you know, we can, we can do something with that. Right. Um, that's the people that don't go in for a long period of time. That makes it really tough. I mean, we can make it work.
Speaker 3:
10:26
I'm a litigator and so, you know, I understand the process of, of how to make that stuff work in a case. Um, but it definitely does not help. Right. And people, people are not medical doctors, you know, they don't, they don't know. So they're just kind of trying to wing it. But you know, I went to a CLE, which for people who are non lawyers, that's called a continuing legal education. Something that lawyers have to go do. And I went to a personal injury CLE, I think it was last year, just, you know, just to go, just to go learn a little bit and stay on top of what's happening out there. And uh, and somebody had a good example. They described it as, you know, even if you're in a small accident, five miles an hour, 10 miles an hour or rear end case, they use an analogy that was really instructive to me.
Speaker 3:
11:08
They said, um, they said, think of your neck and your ligaments in your body or whatever the, you know, whatever the proper term ligaments or whatever. Um, a lot of people think that they're like a rubber band and you can pull the rubber band and it'll go back to its original form. And you can do that in a number of different times. And, and that's fine and there's some parts of your body that that works. But there are other parts of your body where it's much more like a plastic bag that you get out from a grocery store. And so if you pull, if you pull that plastic bag apart, it's not going back. You know, you've permanently deformed that. And that was kind of a good analogy to say. Okay, that makes sense. So you may be in an accident and your, your head bounces around a little bit and it may, you may think that you're next going to bounce back like a rubber band. But in reality there is longterm lasting
Speaker 1:
11:54
damage that you may not feel right away, but it is going to carry over and as you age it's going to get progressively worse. Yeah. And there's all different types of injuries and everybody responds differently to treatment. Um, but also people have different tolerances for pain, which can be tough when someone does have a high tolerance for pain and they don't get in the doctor right away. And, um, you know, then later on realize they have one of these severe injuries. But, but yeah, with, with your example, um, everyone's rehabilitation process is different. Some people don't feel the pain for, for a week. I've had clients where they felt fine for two weeks and then just one day they couldn't get out of bed. And then you get them in and you find out they have all these different issues going on. And um, so yeah, everyone's different.
Speaker 1:
12:42
What's important is that you take care of yourself. Um, you know, you know your body best. Everyone knows their body best, and if there's something that's different or abnormal, um, any discomfort you gotta get it checked out. Better safe than sorry. Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. And it's one of those things that we see this a lot in criminal law to people. People can often think that they can go and figure this stuff out on their own and that can cause a lot more problems than in our area of law for them. You know, not, not their physical health, but their freedom. And you know, whether or not they're gonna be able to apply for jobs and things, and they'll call us after the fact. So just across the board, you know, call a lawyer. That's, that's my, that's my advice. It definitely sounds self-serving, but it's really not.
Speaker 1:
13:28
We're not, you know, we're not going to bill you for a consultation. I don't, I don't know if you bill for initial consultations. We don't. Yeah. So it, it, it, it's no harm in all in, uh, at least having the conversation. Well, I'm going to go back, back to my insurance days. Right. I got out of that and I swear I would never have anything to do with insurance ever again. Like I just, I was really turned off by the whole process and how they handle cases. Um, it just really bothered me. And so I went to law school, really was focusing on general counsel, like working in, in house counsel for, for companies. And um, I was doing that when I, when I hung my shingle and started working for myself, uh, working representing companies. And I had a friend come up to me and asked me to help him with this personal injury case.
Speaker 1:
14:14
And he just asked me to make a phone call. And that's what I did. I made a phone call and, and um, talk to a, an insurance adjuster and was able to negotiate more money for him. And I'm like, wow, that was really cool. It's awesome being on this side of the game. And um, as really just excited about it. And I thought, wow, I think I would really enjoy being on this side, going up against the insurance companies. And so I am very passionate about this. I mean, I, I love, uh, taking a case where an insurance company denied a claim and you have a family that's destitute because they have no car, they have no way to get their medical treatment, jump in there, get them to a doctor right away, get the car fixed because we got the insurance company to pay for it and they get a settlement in the end. I mean, it just is so satisfying to be able to help people through that process. And they can't do it on their own. It's really unfortunate. You should be able to call your insurance company and they should just take care of you, but they don't. Right. And so people like me got to jump in and do it.
Speaker 3:
15:20
Yeah. And, and that's a great segue into a question that I had about, about sort of the public perception of personal injury lawyers because we, you know, personal injury attorneys and criminal lawyers are kind of like attorneys that are sort of considered to be bottom of the barrel. You know, even when I was, when I was going through law school and I was telling my mom, yeah, I'm going to go into criminal law. She's like, Oh, you're going to be a criminal lawyer. Like how can you possibly represent those people and my experience as much the same as yours. You know, our clients are very good people. You know, they had one bad night, they got one argument, you know, something was off in their life and that caused him to be in this, in this situation. But by and large, very good people, their fathers or husbands or wives or parents, you know, their, their teachers, they're business professionals. And so our are, all we're trying to do is help them, uh, put their life back in order with the minimal amount of damage. And you're doing, you're doing much the same thing, but personal injury lawyers, you know, you guys get abused along violence, chase these ambulance chasers. That's the phrase. And that's what they think that, that, that you're doing. But in reality, this is, there's a lot more to it than that.
Speaker 1:
16:26
Oh, a whole lot more to it. I mean, I get it, you know, there are, there are actually attorneys in town that have given it a bad name. Um, you know, and I don't want to go into names or anything like that. I, you know, everyone can judge and make their own judgments and make their own decisions. Um, it's important to find an attorney that's, that's passionate about whatever it is that you need help with. Um, you know, an attorney that's actually present and an authentic, um, you know, somebody who's actually handling the cases, somebody who's actually, you know, doing what needs to be done in your case. And, you know, that's, that's always been one of my prides as I hands on. I'm very hands on with my cases and I, and I work a ton, but I enjoy it and it, and it keeps me going.
Speaker 1:
17:09
Um, so, so yeah, I mean there, there is a bad route, but there's some great attorneys out there that do great work that, you know, they're all over you. You just, you gotta find, I mean, if you're injured in an accident, call me first. I would love to be that great attorney, but, um, yeah, don't be turned off by that. I mean, we're not a money sucking whatever you want to call us. Uh, I, I, I, yeah, I gotta make a living. I have a family, I've got a feed, but I mean my, my heart's in the right place. I'm, I'm, I'm in this to help people and I get satisfaction out of it.
Speaker 3:
17:43
Yeah. And I know that about you and your firm, we've, we've referred, you know, several if not more than that. Yeah. Your cases over your way. Clients are happy
Speaker 1:
17:50
and, and it is, there's a good, there is a good, uh, a good service that's being provided because people don't understand the reality that exists between insurance companies and themselves. They, they, they do see the fluffy ads on TV that we care, we'll stand there for you, call us, you know, we're going to be right there. We're going to make it all go away. But that's just not how it works. They will make it go away. But at your expense, and like you had mentioned, if the, if the, if the environment was a little bit different where all you needed to do was call and, and take it and say, Hey, this happened and they took care of you, your job wouldn't be necessary. Well, yeah, that would be great. Right. In a perfect world. Right, right. But it just doesn't happen that way. And when you were, you know, when we were talking about your passion and why you do these things, you mentioned a word that that is I think, very important.
Speaker 1:
18:41
And you said that I'm a litigator. Yes. That's what you said. Yes. And that's important. I think there's a big distinction between somebody who litigate cases and somebody who doesn't. Can you kind of walk us through why that's important in, in your particular niche? Well, I'll tell you, a majority of the law firms that you see on the freeways and on the TV are not attorneys that go to court. Yeah. Um, they'll, if a case gets to a point to where they can't do anything else just by negotiating, they'll push it out to another law firm. Um, and there's several firms in town that just do litigation for these attorneys. Um, art, my firm actually is one of those firms that does litigation for other attorneys. Yeah. Um, and that's how I actually got my start in PEI besides, you know, that instance that I told you where I'm like, Oh, this is cool.
Speaker 1:
19:25
Well then I picked up the case and, and met one of these attorneys that didn't litigate and he said, Hey, all three some cases you can litigate them for me. And I started litigating for him and others and became a litigator is a really cool, gave me some, some, a great experience and learned how to be a litigator. And basically what that means is I will file lawsuits if an insurance company does not pay or doesn't do what my client feels that they should do, we'll file a lawsuit and we'll go to court and we'll battle it out. Um, it happens a lot. Um, I used to have a file, a lot more lawsuits than I do today. Yeah. Because I've been able to establish a reputation with insurance companies that, Hey, if Chad says he's going to file a lawsuit, he's actually going to file a lawsuit.
Speaker 1:
20:10
Um, and I get offers, I mean, a lot of these firms that send their cases to me, um, the, the claim will be denied or they'll offer a really low offer and then they'll send it to me saying, Hey, Chad, this case has to be litigated. There's nothing we can do. I'll send out a demand with my name on it and I'll settle the case without having to file a lawsuit because I'm able to get more money from him. Right. So yeah, it's important to know, Hey, does my attorney litigate? Um, because you'll get a better settlement and you can look, uh, Maricopa County has a docket. All the cases that are filed, you can look up my name and you'll see all the cases that have my name on it. Yeah. Yeah. And that's, that is critically important
Speaker 3:
20:48
because the, you know, the insurance companies, they're, they're all keeping records. They all know who will litigate and who won't. They have notes on, on different attorneys and different law firms and what the propensity is that they're going to actually go to court and that that's important to their bottom line if they can negotiate, you know, there's kind of two phases, right? You've got a sort of a, a pre-filing negotiation phase. Somebody in a car accident, they come to your office, your office reaches out to the injust, to the adjuster, and there's a conversation back and forth. You know, we think that the damage was $100,000 they think it was $10,000 and there's some negotiation until you meet in the middle and settle the case. Now if that doesn't happen, right? So to kind of take, take that example a little bit further, if you say no, we know for sure this is a a hundred thousand dollar case and they are sure going to only settle for 10 at that point in time.
Speaker 3:
21:42
You say, no, we're going to win this case in court. Negotiations are exhausted and that's your point to say we're going to go file a lawsuit in court. And when we say litigating, that's like what you see in the movies, right? That's been in court in front of the judge, in front of a jury advocating for your case. But there's a lot of personal injury lawyers and a lot of the big spenders that we see kind of on billboards and bus ads all over the place who just don't do any of that. They farm it out to guys, challenge everyone to go and look at the docket and see which of those attorneys is on the docket. I've never done that actually. Yeah, I would, I would, I would be very curious. I have like, I have a suspicion, I have a strong understanding that, and again, it, it's hard.
Speaker 3:
22:22
Yeah. It's actually really, and it takes a lot of time. Takes a lot of resources. It's expensive. Yeah. Um, you know it, but it's something that has to be done in my opinion, to really send a message, Hey, look, my clients are going to get what they deserve. Right. Because the insurance companies will then know that you don't, they know, right. They'll, they'll, they'll take your name and they'll say, uh, you know, John never files lawsuits. And so in every single conversation with that ingester you can say, well, this is ridiculous, man. I'm going to file a lawsuit about it. And they're going, no, you're not. I've seen, we know we have your records, we have your record and you're not going to file anything. It's the same in criminal law. There are, there are a lot of criminal lawyers who plead people out. They take the first deal that's offered by the prosecutor's office and they never go to trial.
Speaker 3:
23:05
And prosecutors know that affirm gets a reputation for that. So there's a, there's a lot of value in making sure you find, find somebody who's gonna who's gonna carry the heft that you want in your case. Definitely. Yeah. No, I strongly encourage you to do the homework and figure out if you're looking for any kind of attorney. I mean you want to know, is this attorney that's actually going to fight for me or is this an attorney that's going to pass my case on to another attorney who actually fights. Yeah. Yeah. It's, it's interesting. I, I'm curious kind of what your thoughts are on, on the future of personal injury law. You know, a lot of personal injury cases are car accidents and
Speaker 1:
23:46
more and more we're seeing automation there. We were talking, we were talking about automation off off the air about, you know, our law firms, our offices, how are we going to, you know, adjust to kind of the changing times there. But similarly, you know, and I've, and I've thought about this again in criminal law, you know, if, if the cars are driving themselves and nobody's behind the wheel, that's a lot less DUIs. Oh yeah. For our, for our firm now from a business perspective, that's not, not necessarily great, but I would happily be happily have no more DUIs on the road. Like people think, you know, I've had conversations with people, well that's really going to hurt your business and it may in the short term would it, we may get less DUI cases, but we'll find other things to do. People are still going to be needing criminal lawyers.
Speaker 1:
24:29
Like that's never going to change. But my point is that, you know, the, the dynamics are changing all around. And so I was kinda curious as to what your thoughts are with more, you know, more Uber's, everybody's investing in the automated vehicle technology. We see them all around Arizona, different companies here and there. Um, kinda what your thoughts are on how that, on how that future should unfold or will unfold. Hey, my opinion, less accidents is great. I'm all for it. I hope, I hope we can figure out a way to get away from having all these car accidents. But unfortunately, accidents have been increasing in this state. I mean we're having a lot of people, 500 people a day moving to Arizona. Yeah. 500 people a day who aren't familiar with our roads, who aren't familiar with, you know, how we drive here because everyone drives a little different no matter where you go.
Speaker 1:
25:16
Um, and so somehow we've seen an increase in accidents and fatalities and um, yeah, I hope it solves that problem. I hope we can, you know, get over that hump and start seeing those numbers go down. Um, but you know, car accidents, the other large part of my work, um, but we do a lot of other negligence claims. I mean, we do slip and falls. We do, um, uh, dog bites. We do wrongful death. I mean, there's a lot of different kinds of cases that we handle a lot of pharmaceutical cases. You know, you see all these, um, commercials for the mass tort claims that the pharmaceutical companies are where a medication has these adverse side effects and or, I mean, there's all kinds of different claims that we handle as well in addition to the car accident. So, I mean, I'm optimistic about our business.
Speaker 1:
26:02
I mean, it's just going to keep growing, but um, you know, the car accidents, yeah, we'll probably see, hopefully a change with that with the autonomous vehicles, but it feels like it keeps getting pushed back. It's, you know, yeah. Yeah. I think a lot of the initial estimates were very overly optimistic about five years ago. I remember somebody saying, Oh, 10 years we're, you know, we're going to be out of business and here we are five years later and we're, no, you're nowhere near that. Yeah, yeah. Yeah. It's, it is curious where things will go. I'm, I'm excited about it. I mean, I would prefer not to drive anywhere. I'd rather have a self driving car that just drove me places. I like to drive. Do you like to drive? I do. I like to drive. It's fun. Yeah. I mean I go, yeah, it's scary sometimes depending on what part of town you're in.
Speaker 1:
26:47
Yeah. Well that's true. Well, and that's the other thing too. I mean, if these cars are all self driving themselves, you know, and they get into accidents. Now we're talking about, is that, is that a products liability? Oh yeah. Products liability. I mean there's going to be a lot of different, it'll be interesting how it evolves for sure. I mean, you have these Waymo, there's been Waymo cases. I mean today in the news, there was a guy that was going in front of him and slamming on his brakes rear ended. Well he got rear ended and the dink didn't know that. The guy didn't know. They have cameras all over those things. So it's all on video. This guy like going in front of the Waymo and slamming on his brakes. Um, yeah, so you have people like that. But yeah, I mean, these cars aren't perfect and software glitches and who knows what else we're in for.
Speaker 1:
27:31
Um, only time will tell. Yeah. Yeah. And those are, those are companies with deep pockets with a lot, a lot of money. And so, you know, a lot of the lawyers are going to be seeing, you know, dollar signs at the end of there and they're, and they're going to have their own teams of lawyers and so it's going to be, it will be interesting, but that's part of what, you know, what's necessary for progress. Yeah. Yeah. We'll see what happens. I'm excited for it either way. Yeah. That'll be, that'll be, that'd be great. Um, okay. Well what about, what about, you know, building your firm? I, I wanted to kinda get your take on that, right? Cause you're a cofounder of it, big horn and uh, from, looks like it's doing very well, right? You got a number of people, firms grow and like you said, you know, um, how has that process been?
Speaker 1:
28:14
You go from working in insurance to starting a law firm. So now you're a lawyer, you're a litigator, you're an entrepreneur. Um, how, how has that journey been for you? Oh my goodness. I can't even think of like one word that would, it chaos. It's been, it's been a wild ride. Um, it's been awesome. It's been so fun. Um, so I, I, I was a solo practitioner, hung my shingle, rented a law school, basically took everything as it came in the door, um, started focusing more on bad faith cases and then I started getting more into personal injury through these experiences that I was sharing with you. Um, you know, and then there came a time to where I'm like, you know, I need a partner. I need to grow this. I can't do it by myself. And so I was able to partner with, um, two other guys that, um, had a, from out of state.
Speaker 1:
29:01
They operated under a different name. And then we got together, we merged our firms and we created big horn law together. And it's just been an amazing, um, you know, they're, they're great people to work with. And, and you know, once something that really I think sets us apart is our dedication to this cause we, we work really hard and been able to build this practice on pounding the pavement, meeting people in the community, getting my name out there. And it's just really grown fast, fast and it's been solid and it's been fun. Um, but it just comes back to, to hard work.
Speaker 3:
29:43
Yeah. I, I can relate to all of that. Uh, that the chaos word, the, the reward word, it is a lot. You know, cause you're trying to, you're trying to be an excellent attorney. You're trying to provide value and, uh, you know, deliver for your clients. But at the same time you've got, you've got all these other business things that you got to handle that have to be in sync with that, you know, so, you know, the firm can grow, you can continue to provide value. Uh, but you've got to nurture your employees and you gotta make sure the books are okay, your trust accounts good. And you're not in trouble with the bar. And so, so it's a lot, but it's very exciting. And it sounds like, you know, things are going very well for you. Any big, uh, you know, kind of 20, 20 goals or focus this year. Anything that you guys are working on. Yeah, well
Speaker 1:
30:30
growth, it's, it's really growth and then maintaining the same values and standards that we've maintained this whole time. Um, talking to the clients is, as soon as you know, talking to them right away and being able to maintain great communication with all of our clients and continuing to get the great settlements that we get our clients. I mean, that's, that's huge. Um, and I look forward to that being even better as we continue to learn more and we'll spend more time in court.
Speaker 3:
30:59
Yeah. Continue litigating. And that's something that you enjoy. You like being like the courtroom activity?
Speaker 1:
31:04
I do. I do. It's every time you walk in there, you're, your stomach kind of turns upside down a little bit. You're like, Oh my gosh, what's going to happen? Yeah. It's, it's a wild ride sometimes, but it's, it's fun. It's, it keeps you, keeps you, gee, I don't know. It keeps you sharp, man. Yeah. It keeps you sharp.
Speaker 3:
31:22
Yeah, I can relate to that. I, yeah. Even even, you know, practicing for six years and I still go into court, I'm like, Oh man, let's see, let's see what happens here. Because you know there's, there's only so much you can pre prepare for in court. There's always those little variables that you can't really account for other than just having dealt with them before in the past and knowing that you can handle it. It's like going up to the line of scrimmage. If you're the quarterback in a football game like you, you, you have an idea of what they're going to do, they're going to try to tackle you. How are they going to do it? Well, we're going to find out as soon as the ball gets snapped and you're going to have to make some adjustments and response. So it is exciting. It's a lot of fun and I'm glad that you do that.
Speaker 3:
31:59
Every judge is different too. And then you go from a state or County court, then you go to federal court and it's a whole new, yeah, I don't of course don't ballgame. Oh geez. Yeah. But it's fun. It's good stuff. Well good man. So where, where are the best places for people to connect with you? You know, if they're, if they want to hang on to your number, if they want to check out your website, follow you on social media. You know, ideally nobody listening is in a car accident but, but they may want to hang on to your number cause they, they may well be or they may know somebody who is.
Speaker 1:
32:30
Yeah. So the phone number is (602) 553-0000. Um, we've got three offices in the Valley. There's one in Phoenix, another one in Mesa. Then in Chandler. Um, lot of our information can be found on our website. Big horn law.com has all the locations and contact numbers and all that. But we also do social media, have got an Instagram account. It's big horn law, a Z. um, that's actually a really good, good follow that we, we do a lot of community events, um, involved in the community. Uh, in fact this weekend we're giving away a car. We've partnered with a couple of different companies and we're going to give away a car this Saturday. It's kind of cool. Um, this is the third one we've done. The last two are really cool with one of the, the lady that won the first car on Thanksgiving day, she walked there with their four kids cause they didn't have a car and she drove home.
Speaker 1:
33:23
It was amazing. Pretty rad. I mean that, that really, and we gave away 500 turkeys too. That's awesome. Um, you know, we did the same thing for Christmas. We gave away a bunch of toys and we give away a car and I mean that just really makes it, I mean that was crying, giving away turkeys, people that like waiting in line for a couple of hours to get a free Turkey. Yeah, really cool. Super powerful. But um, yeah. And then, uh, we do Spanish, a lot of Spanish campaigns. Um, I speak Spanish and so we have 'em actually go as WeDo he gun thay which is giant white. Yay. Yeah. So our social media there is a will he guns day or Instagram, whatever he got. They are on Facebook. Um, it's been a lot of fun that that is a lot of fun. That's funny. And for the audio only listeners, he is a big guy, right?
Speaker 1:
34:10
You're six, seven you told me. Yeah, I did just all the cameras and everything. I was like [inaudible]. I'm like, what the heck just happened here. But, but that's funny that you've got that campaign going in Spanish. I love it. It's been so fun. That's fun. Well, awesome man. Chad, I really appreciate you coming on the show. Everybody, you know where to connect with him. Go to big horn law.com. You can check them out on Instagram at big horn law, a Z. They've got three offices around the Valley. They do great work. We've sent a lot of cases over to Chad and his team. So, uh, follow his advice. Follow my advice. Anytime you're in any legal problem, just at least have a phone call, do a 15 minute phone call, see if there's anything they can do to help Chad shop big horn LA, thanks for coming on the show, my friend. Thank you very much.
Speaker 2:
34:52
The ruler nation podcast is brought to you by the RN Dar law group, Arizona's premier criminal defense and personal injury law firm available@wwwdotrrlawaz.com or give us a call, four eight zero four zero zero one three.
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