Gruler Nation Podcast

Episode #91: Foxy Fitness with Dr. Mallory Fox

February 26, 2020
Gruler Nation Podcast
Episode #91: Foxy Fitness with Dr. Mallory Fox
Chapters
Gruler Nation Podcast
Episode #91: Foxy Fitness with Dr. Mallory Fox
Feb 26, 2020
Robert F. Gruler Jr., Esq.

Mallory Fox is a doctor of health science with dual master degrees in health science and kinesiology. A native Arizonan, she excelled in competitive swimming, which led her to work in the health and fitness industry 15 years ago. Mallory worked as a personal trainer, in management, and finally started her own business, Foxy FIT, in 2013. Her mission is to help people move better, so that they can feel better and live better.  

 

Mallory and her husband Brian are ambassadors at Lululemon in the Scottsdale Quarter, where they enjoy leading community events and charity work through their pop-up yoga community, Baptiste Power Yoga Phoenix. Mallory is passionate about resilience because after she was rear- ended in 2018 she was diagnosed with a concussion and brain stem trauma that resulted in her brain "shutting off" and she became legally blind in her left eye within 10 weeks of the accident. Mallory eventually recovered with support from others in her community who could understand, empathize, or just believe in her.  

Now, she strives to pay it forward for her clients and community projects. 

 

Mallory and her husband are holding a community yoga class  at Helio Basin Brewing Co on Saturday, March 21, at 10am. It is open to all, with all proceeds donated to the Love Your Brain Foundation in honor of Mindful March. Tickets are available on Eventbrite and Mallory encourages everyone to join!  

 

Be sure to follow Mallory on Instagram @drfoxyfit and check out her blog at www.befoxyfit.com/lemonloves or if you have any specific questions for Mallory reach out to her by email at info@befoxyfit.com  

 

#foxyfit #fitness #health #kinesiology #personaltrainer #yoga #popupyoga #yogaclasses #lululemon #mindfulness #loveyourbrain #podcast #InspirationwithGrulerNation #inspire #gruler #inspiration #GrulerNation #GrulerNationPodcast #gnp #arizonapodcast #scottsdale #yesphx #phx  

 

The Gruler Nation Podcast is a show that focuses on conversations with interesting "Level 10" people passionate about changing the world with their work, relationships and ideas. The show is hosted by Robert Gruler, an attorney and founding partner of the R&R Law Group, a criminal defense law firm based in Scottsdale, Arizona focused on helping good people charged with crimes move forward with their lives.   

 

Interested in being on the show or have a guest recommendation? Email Robert directly at robert@rrlawaz.com or visit www.robgruler.com for more information.  

 

Show Notes Transcript

Mallory Fox is a doctor of health science with dual master degrees in health science and kinesiology. A native Arizonan, she excelled in competitive swimming, which led her to work in the health and fitness industry 15 years ago. Mallory worked as a personal trainer, in management, and finally started her own business, Foxy FIT, in 2013. Her mission is to help people move better, so that they can feel better and live better.  

 

Mallory and her husband Brian are ambassadors at Lululemon in the Scottsdale Quarter, where they enjoy leading community events and charity work through their pop-up yoga community, Baptiste Power Yoga Phoenix. Mallory is passionate about resilience because after she was rear- ended in 2018 she was diagnosed with a concussion and brain stem trauma that resulted in her brain "shutting off" and she became legally blind in her left eye within 10 weeks of the accident. Mallory eventually recovered with support from others in her community who could understand, empathize, or just believe in her.  

Now, she strives to pay it forward for her clients and community projects. 

 

Mallory and her husband are holding a community yoga class  at Helio Basin Brewing Co on Saturday, March 21, at 10am. It is open to all, with all proceeds donated to the Love Your Brain Foundation in honor of Mindful March. Tickets are available on Eventbrite and Mallory encourages everyone to join!  

 

Be sure to follow Mallory on Instagram @drfoxyfit and check out her blog at www.befoxyfit.com/lemonloves or if you have any specific questions for Mallory reach out to her by email at info@befoxyfit.com  

 

#foxyfit #fitness #health #kinesiology #personaltrainer #yoga #popupyoga #yogaclasses #lululemon #mindfulness #loveyourbrain #podcast #InspirationwithGrulerNation #inspire #gruler #inspiration #GrulerNation #GrulerNationPodcast #gnp #arizonapodcast #scottsdale #yesphx #phx  

 

The Gruler Nation Podcast is a show that focuses on conversations with interesting "Level 10" people passionate about changing the world with their work, relationships and ideas. The show is hosted by Robert Gruler, an attorney and founding partner of the R&R Law Group, a criminal defense law firm based in Scottsdale, Arizona focused on helping good people charged with crimes move forward with their lives.   

 

Interested in being on the show or have a guest recommendation? Email Robert directly at robert@rrlawaz.com or visit www.robgruler.com for more information.  

 

Support the show (https://www.ericshouse.org/donate/)

Speaker 1:
0:01
This is [inaudible]
Speaker 2:
0:01
is episode 91 of the ruler nation podcast. My name is Robert ruler joined today by Mallory Fox, Mallory foxes. A lot of accomplishments and I want to run through some of them just as a way of introduction. So Mallory Fox is a doctor of health science. She's got duals dual master's degrees in health science and kinesiology. She's a native
Speaker 1:
0:21
to Arizona, just like me. Uh, she did competitive swimming and she actually has been in the health and fitness industry. She got into that about 15 years ago working with people as a personal trainer, management, so on until she started her own business. Foxy fit in 2013 today. She helps people move better, feel better, live better, and she's got a whole slew of accomplishments, different certifications and things like Fastenal, stretch therapy, yoga, mindfulness, uh, her and her husband are also ambassadors to Lulu lemon and Scottsdale quarter. They've got an event coming up. We'll talk about that at the end of the show, but a lot to dive into. But first of all, let me thank you for being on the program. Mallory,
Speaker 3:
0:59
thank you so much for having me, Rob. And thank you for the beautiful introduction.
Speaker 1:
1:03
Well, it's a nice, it's a nice list of accomplishments you've got there. So I want to make sure somebody, you know, hammers that home. So what I wanted to dive into when I was looking through some of your, your, your website and your material and these things. You use this phrase, you called it resilience, resilience in health, fitness in life. And you know, that's kind of a unique angle. I, well I've had a lot of other, uh, you know, fitness people on the show and yoga and natural pass and acupuncture and all sorts of stuff and everybody kinda has their, you know, their little tweak on it. But when I read that, when I heard about resilience in health, that was something that was, that was kind of new and novel to me. And so I'd love to kind of start there and see, uh, you know, we're, how, how did that come up or what is that about?
Speaker 3:
1:49
Absolutely. I'm not such a great question. I'm so excited. So, um, having worked with over 30,000 client hours over the last 15 years, um, I've worked with a lot of people with multiple medical issues and overcoming injuries, professional athletes, trying to get back into the game and being a self acknowledged nerd. I love to study what makes people tick. So how do some people come back from a devastating illness or injury and succeed and even become stronger and healthier than before? And what is it that makes some people not come back and have to completely change their lives? So I've always been very curious about figuring out, okay, is there a scientific formula that I can create and then replicate? And, um, resilience is a huge word in, um, in the medical industry and in terms of health resilience. Um, I've had my own journey with that over the last year and a half. That's really changed how I approach working with my clients.
Speaker 1:
2:54
Yeah. So tell me about that. Cause I know, I know this was something that was, was uh, you know, be a deal in your life and it kind of a fork in the road, you know, you could've gone in a number of different ways, but it was led kind of the inspiration of this resilience. So tell me about, about what happened to you in 2018
Speaker 3:
3:11
absolutely. So I was driving to work, I just taught yoga at the air national guard base where my husband's active duty military and um, we don't call it yoga there, we call it combat stretching. Yeah. So anyone listening, if you're in the military, it wasn't yoga, it was combat stretching before inclined to do combat stretching. Yes. Yes. Combat stretching is pretty, pretty cool. Um, so I used to teach there Tuesdays and Thursdays, um, for their PT time. And so I was heading to work and I stopped a delay and I got rear-ended. The driver just didn't see me, so she hit me at about 50 miles an hour. Wow. Yeah, a complete stop. I saw right before she hit me. So in my rear view I saw and I was like, Oh gosh. So I actually started to turn into the open lane and next to me. And um, yeah, it was that moment in time, even talking about it. This was on Scott, a Thunderbird near Tatum [inaudible].
Speaker 3:
4:15
And so, you know, the accident scene was pretty stressful and I won't get into all of that, but yeah. Um, you know, I knew I was really shaken up and just didn't feel great. Um, I wasn't bleeding or anything, so, and I didn't call an ambulance for myself and it was the next morning when I woke up that I couldn't lift my head off on the pillow in my bed. And, um, at that point in my life, you know, I was very type a overachiever, perfectionist, like always just booked to the max in terms of work and life and volunteering and family and just really taking everything on all, on my own. And, um, just really didn't have time for anything else and it didn't have time to take care of my health needs. I was in great shape. I was 32 years old. I really didn't need to set aside a whole lot more time to take care of my health.
Speaker 3:
5:09
Right. And that just changed. Um, so I was diagnosed with concussion and some trauma to my brainstem and then, um, not great medical care. I'm a patient at Barrow's concussion and brain injury center. And my, the biggest thing was my vision. So if you're sitting right there where you were, um, it would appear as if you're moving up and down side to side and there'd be like four of you and then 10 of you and then, you know, maybe back to like one and a half. So my vision was always shifting. I was really disoriented. If you can think about what it would be like to be in like one of those, um, horror movies where just, you know, you have no idea what's real. You have no idea like where someone is in, um, in your, in that space. And that's what I was living with. So I got in to see a specialist in neuro optometrist and she found that my, I had moved in the crash just ever so slightly. Um, so my ILA man had changed and my brain had shot off my left eye to compensate. So 10 weeks after that accident, I was studying legally blind in my left eye. Wow. Yeah. And I was 32 years old. That's horrifying. Yeah.
Speaker 1:
6:26
You know, this is just real quickly, we had the, we had a guest on prior to your show who's a personal injury lawyer and, and he was talking about how exactly how that happens. You know, how you can get into an accident and think that you're okay, but 10 weeks later you wake up and you're, you're basically blind in an eye. And, um, and I just had to point that out. If, you know, for consistent listeners, like you just heard an episode 90 what he talked about, and here is a perfect example of that happening. Anyways.
Speaker 3:
6:59
No, no, don't be sorry. It's, it's important for people to know. And even with all of my medical expertise and even I didn't know that that could happen. Right. And, um, you know, I had a ton of symptoms throughout that, but when things were getting worse and all of my physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, neurologist appointments, medications, nothing was making it better, then it was like, Oh gosh. And suddenly, yeah, legally blind. So, um, that was a huge point. I was in denial about that diagnosis for a little bit because, um, you know, I had that mindset of, okay, I love a challenge, so you give me a challenge and I'm gonna research the hell out of it and come up with the perfect plan and just execute the plan. Right, and fix it. So in my head I was thinking that I would just be back to normal.
Speaker 3:
7:51
I was going to give myself three months total after the time of the accident to get back to 100%. My laugh now because, you know, clearly I just didn't know what it would take, but I couldn't let myself, um, even consider a future without my eyesight. Um, like at that point, I couldn't drive. I wasn't allowed to go to the grocery store. I mean, when I needed something from, you know, the, the drug store, I couldn't, I couldn't even walk there. Um, so I was very independent and it was such a shift for me to have to realize, okay, I'm going to have to ask for help, I'm going to have to accept help. Um, and, and that was huge. So that required a lot of resilience. Um, and it helped me to see, okay, when people are, you know, pretty healthy, I've never had to face something life changing. What is it that makes me decide to embrace this new person? [inaudible] and so that experience,
Speaker 1:
8:56
well it's, I mean it sounds like you've got a lot going on there. You know, you've already got kind of a personality where you are an overachiever, you know, you're, which is kind of a terrible word. I don't even like that word cause it's like, anyways, I can rant on that for a long time. But the point is, you know, you've got, uh, you've got this tendency of your in your personality to, to go and achieve great things and do, do a lot with yourself and your life. Yeah, you get hit with this thing and suddenly all of those achievements kinda mean nothing. Right. All of that. Like what are you supposed to do with all of all of the things you've accomplished if you can't see and walk down the hallway.
Speaker 3:
9:35
It was, it was like a big giant life joke. It was like, okay, smarty pants, right? Yeah. And I really, I hit an identity crisis. Like I didn't know who I was without those achievements. I didn't know who I was without being a doctor of health science and without, you know, being the person who helped people heal. Yeah. Um, you know, a piece of that team. Cause he goes, I couldn't even do it for myself. I was following every guideline, every recommendation, all latest research and um, I couldn't fix myself.
Speaker 1:
10:12
Well, you're relying on, on a lot of experts in other fields, right. So what are the doctors telling you? You know, so I mean, I didn't even realize that your eye socket can shift and throw off the alignment. It reminds me of like an alignment in your car. You know, you hit, you hit a bump in your alignment's off and now your car has proper tire wear and all that. So that can happen in your, in your brain and your mind. But you know, you're listening to a doctor who says, this is your diagnosis. Did they say it'll get better in three months? Did they say this is something, this is just how it is now? Or walk me through kind of, you know, the, the next conversation because you walk in and you say, yeah, this happened to me, but so what now what
Speaker 3:
10:46
[inaudible] yeah, great question. So I, um, started vision therapy and I had a one on one session, 30 minutes long, um, every week. And it was, it was a pretty incredible process because just like you, I had no idea that an I could shift and I loved the car alignment analogy cause it's hard to explain to people. Um, so a lot of my vision therapy started with, I had an iPad and it was very bland. Eyepatch I ended up bedazzleing it with rhinestones and I put a Lulu lemon emblem on it because I spent a lot of time with that iPad. Um, the first thing that we did was to get my left eye turning back on. Okay. And so my homework for the first couple of weeks of vision therapy, cause I had 30 minutes of homework to do every day, was to sit down, put on the eyepatch over my right eye and hang out.
Speaker 3:
11:43
And I was someone who hated sitting still, right? I hated silence. I was like, how is sitting somewhere for 30 minutes going to help me get my eyesight back? Like this is ridiculous. And you know, they told me when you start to get pain or, or symptoms like rest. And that was another concept that was just really foreign to me. Like, well if I rest, I'm never going to get better. So I really struggled with the guidelines that the neuro optometrist and my vision therapist gave me because again, I came from that mindset of gotta work harder, gotta hustle gotta push harder, need to do more. And they were saying, I was young, I was healthy, I had 20, 20 vision pre accident. They're saying you should get your eyesight back, we can train the muscles around the eye to bring the eye back down, we can train the left eye to turn back on and then strengthen the muscles.
Speaker 3:
12:42
You'd will get your eyesight back, like you'll have a full recovery. They really believed that. And so I had to make a decision to, to trust them. Yeah. And um, it wasn't smooth progress. I was envisioned therapy for over a year. Wow. I just recently graduated and um, yeah, the, the stuff that we started to do towards like nine months out was really fun. It was more sports specific because I work with movement, so I need to be able to track, um, people moving. And what are some of the milestones? Um, I was able to start driving again in March. Um, so about six months after the accident and I was released to drive for short distances and broad daylight. And, um, that was also like, that was a huge, interesting thing cause I was like, yeah, okay, I'll just drive myself to work cause I'd started working again. Yeah. And I, I live about 15 minutes away from work. I was definitely not ready to drive to work because the, um, amount of strain. Do you ever think about like if you spend a lot of time on your computer, do your eyes get tired by the end of the day? Like if you're
Speaker 1:
13:56
me, yeah, I have got blue blockers right here. The nowhere to, to, to keep my eyes. Okay.
Speaker 3:
14:01
Yeah. So like the amount of work that the muscles are on my eyes had to do to keep me focused in a five minute drive was like four days worth of 24, seven computer work. Like it was a type of fatigue I've never experienced before in my life. Yeah. It's weird. Yeah. So even those little, I had to learn how to celebrate those little milestones. Um, yeah.
Speaker 1:
14:29
Yeah. I mean I was thinking back, you know, it's like your parents taking away your license again. Like, you know, you have all of that freedom. Remember when you turn 16 and you get your driver's license and I can do everything now, I can go to the store and go to my friend's house and suddenly all of that's gone. It would be a very weird, um, thing to have to, to have to deal with. And then you're kind of learning to see again almost. I mean, you really are to see. So
Speaker 3:
14:52
yeah. What does that feel like? It's a wild thing. Well, in the whole time I looked perfectly fine. Yeah. I mean, I, I looked fine. Um, people could tell like just from a look in my eye that I didn't feel well and I had a migraine that lasted from the day after the accident until um, June. So 10 straight months of terrible pain. So like that adds a layer to it. Um, but the whole time, like I looked fine. Yeah.
Speaker 1:
15:21
So, so you said you kind of just graduated and how is everything?
Speaker 3:
15:27
No, so 20, 20, again, in both eyes and when I get tired, I want to get stressed. That's when my eyesight starts to weaken. So then I take a break.
Speaker 1:
15:37
Yeah. But it's been about a total, maybe a year and a half, close to two years.
Speaker 3:
15:41
Year and a half. Yeah. [inaudible] yeah.
Speaker 1:
15:44
Yeah. That's a long journey. So when you're going through all of that, you know, you have, you have this thing that we all take for granted, remove from you and you know, you're, you're have a disposition. Your personality is the type that you want to be doing these things. You probably feel trapped, you feel, you know, depressed. I'm pro, you know, probably anxious. I'm sure you got a lot of those types of emotions swirling around. So how did you kind of, you know, keep your strength up, keep your energy up, uh, you know, keep, keep the train on the tracks moving forward over that year and a half.
Speaker 3:
16:16
Yeah. Oh, you asked such good questions.
Speaker 1:
16:19
Thank you. Yeah. It's, uh, it's easy. You make it easy. You're really good at this. Thank you.
Speaker 3:
16:25
Yeah. Um, so I'll be honest, like I didn't for a while. Yeah. Because, um, this challenged me to the point of just really questioning and like my whole entire mindset, like what I believed, you know, if you work hard and you push yourself and you, you know, ask the right questions, you will get results. And I was used to getting results really fast. So it was, um, December of 2018, so three, four months after my accident where I hit like a rock bottom because doing everything right, doing everything by the book wasn't changing immediately and I was expecting the magic wand. And, um, that's when I realized, okay, I need to drastically change or I'm not going to make it out of this. Yeah. Because, you know, I love my work. I love being independent and being able to drive myself wherever. And um, I, it was right before an eye exam, so every eight weeks I'd get my vision rechecked and it was, you know, like an hour or two of testing and, um, you know, my left eye was starting to fire sometimes, but it wasn't consistent and I still saw double constantly.
Speaker 3:
17:45
And I just had this moment of I'm not going to graduate from vision therapy this week. What does that mean for my life? Yeah. And how long can I go on without with this unknown. And, um, that's when I asked for help and I reached out to my husband. I told him, Hey, I know I look really strong. I don't show emotions. Like I didn't show how scared I was and how hopeless and depressed and anxious I was. Um, I told him, I said I need help. And, um, a lot of therapy. So I was seeing two different therapists, um, just to talk about the changes. Cause at that point I wasn't even acknowledging that it was a thing. I wasn't even talking about it to people. Um, because I didn't grow up that way. I didn't grow up. Like let's talk about our feelings and,
Speaker 1:
18:34
yeah. And so these therapists that you're meeting with, these are, these, these aren't, you know, I, I doctors or you know, chiropractors or somebody else who you would expect you go speak with after an accident. This is somebody to say, Hey, you know, you've got, you've got these tumultuous emotions circling through your, through your mind. Let's sort through some of that.
Speaker 3:
18:52
Yeah, definitely. And I had the physical therapy, occupational therapy, vision therapy. I had all of those therapists too. At one point. I had like eight different therapists. Yeah. Yeah. You know, the, the psychotherapy really, really helped because, and that's where I learned about resilience, not just from a textbook, what resilience is, but how that applied to my life. Um, cause this whole time I was really hard on myself. Like I must be doing something wrong if I'm not myself right now. And, um, I just didn't have the tools to, to get myself out of that. And so therapy helped a ton. Um, I have some friends who have just been incredible supports, um, cause it's required them to change too. And my husband, Brian, you know, we had just gotten married four months before my accident, so, um, suddenly I changed completely and put a lot of stress on us too. And so he's had to adapt and, and um, yeah, I've really relied on my friendships, my Lulu lemon community, um, have been just fantastic and, and that's what's gotten me through, like having the people around me that believed in me and that cared even when I couldn't do all of the things for them that I used to do. Like being able to receive that back that's helped me a ton.
Speaker 1:
20:13
Yeah. And, and being a good recipient, you know, is something that's difficult for a lot of entrepreneurs or type a people, anybody you know, who's kind of used to being in the, in the provider, the caretaker role, the creator, the business owner, and then to suddenly say, this is something I can't handle. I need help. Yeah. It's not a comfortable feeling.
Speaker 3:
20:35
And I have a lot of pride, um, saying that I need help is like so hard. It's still hard for me. Like that doesn't go away. Like my personality who am underneath it, that never goes away. Right. Um, I just learn how to support myself better, how to work better through it. How to be more honest about what's going on. Yeah.
Speaker 1:
21:00
[inaudible] it's, it's difficult thing to have. And I think a lot of people probably don't necessarily understand it. You know, they, cause a lot of people are more comfortable. And I think there's something that maybe is, you know, wired differently in entrepreneurs brains or, or you know, certain types of people where it just is not something that they're used to. Or maybe it's part of their upbringing. Who knows? But then the, you know, the other side of that is you don't need to ask for a lot of help if you can solve most things. Yeah. So what do you need help for? So you don't, you don't practice that. It's just like your eye, your eye practice where you practice training your muscles. We don't have any reps and asking for help. We're not very good at that.
Speaker 3:
21:37
Exactly. And, and I didn't trust others to help me either cause I was like, I can do it better than you, so why would I ask you to do it?
Speaker 1:
21:44
Right. And so it's a, it's a weird thing too when it comes to, comes to certain things that are outside of your control. So, you know, I, there was a news that somebody famous, you know, just came down with, uh, with cancer. And I started thinking about that and kind of my own, I was thinking about that at the gym and my own sort of, um, you know, what if that happened to me kind of internalizing that. And I was thinking, well, you know, I would still wake up and go to the gym and I was thinking about kind of my day and about how I would, uh, you know, try to heal myself and all this stuff. And then I started realizing, you know, there's only so much you can do that at some point, you know, it's outside of your control. You can't out-think it, you can't outwork it. Your body's going to do what your body is going to do, you know, positive energy, positive attitude. It's great, but it can only go so far and then you have to listen to your body or listen to somebody else or go get, get help from, from somebody. Like you said, you trust.
Speaker 3:
22:37
Yeah. Yeah. You're spot on. Yeah.
Speaker 1:
22:41
Well I'm glad. I'm glad that you've, you found your way through it because a lot of other people may not, you know, may not have done that. You know, I think, uh, an accident like that can have the impact of spiraling out of control. You know, you can lose your job, you can lose your, you're in a brand new marriage, could have lost your marriage. So, uh, now having those lessons, you know, you've already got a ton of background in fitness. You've been doing it for a very long time since I think 15 years. And so, you know, now you've had this experience in your life. I think you've come out on the other side much stronger, much, much more resilient as, as you say. So what are you doing now to sort of, uh, you know, help other people because other people have their own hardships in their own, you know, tumultuous times. So tell me about, you know, kind of what it is you're doing now.
Speaker 3:
23:30
Yeah. Um, now I'm just sharing it. So I used to bottle all of that up. You know, I've been through really difficult times in my life and when I did back then, you know, pre-injury was, I'd work harder and I'd hold it in. I would, um, you know, be pretty hard on myself to get myself through something. And, um, you know, what I, what I do now is I just talk about it and, and that helps other people to understand, one, they're not alone. Um, hearing other people share what they went through with traumatic brain injury helped me to heal. Yeah. Because it was so hard to explain and even understand what was happening in my own brain because I wasn't in control of my body or my brain. And you know, it feels crazy making sometimes too. So having other survivors of traumatic brain injury share their experiences. Like every time someone said to me, yeah, I went through that too. And to be able to see them on the other side, like that's what helped me to get through it. And so that's what I'm doing now is just sharing with people. Um, yeah. And thank you for having me on this podcast that I can share this with others and yeah, thank you. And, and just helping people to, um, to understand that you can change.
Speaker 1:
24:51
So that almost sounds like a support group. Are there these little communities that, or how are you sharing that? Are there other, you know, I don't, dunno. I don't know how that works.
Speaker 3:
25:02
Great. So, um, the love your brain foundation is a nonprofit that was created by Kevin Pearce and he was an Olympic hopeful. He was a world gold medal, a snowboarder. And right before the Vancouver Olympics he had a training accident and he had a traumatic brain injury and it was career ending for him. So 10 years ago, he and his family, um, created the love your brain foundation. Um, Kevin used yoga and mindfulness to help him, uh, foster resilience and build, um, build him back up after his brain injury. And so that's what they do. They pay for pay it forward now by providing free yoga and mindfulness tools to TBI survivors and to their caregivers because caregivers of people with a brain injury, um, you know, their lives change too. And so, um, communities like the love your brain foundation, um, you know, that could really be a sense of support.
Speaker 3:
26:00
Um, there are support groups. The Arizona brain injury Alliance is, um, really fantastic. They have a conference every year in may. And so you meet other people who are living with it, who've lived through it. Um, and you know, once I started to talk about it, that's like other people, I know so many people who've had a brain injury and so many people who have varying degrees of symptoms, whether it's, you know, six months out or whether it's 20 years out. Yeah. And I've gotten to, you know, become close to, to others just through talking about our shared experiences.
Speaker 1:
26:36
That's great. Yeah. And I've got similar experiences to that I would've never went. You know, I, uh, had a loss in my family is due to suicide. And so I was very much like you, I was very kind of keeping that to myself. And same with my drinking. I mentioned a little bit to you and you know, once I start talking about it, it's funny everybody from all these people come out of the woodwork and they've got similar experiences and similar stories. And then if you can have a conversation with them, you can help each other and kind of heal as you go through it together.
Speaker 3:
27:06
Yeah. Thanks for sharing that. I'm so sorry for your loss. Yeah. And, and you know, you wouldn't talk about traumatic brain injury survivors, but anyone who's experienced a loss, whether it's cancer or loss of a loved one, um, that pain is all the same. And so people will come up to me after I spoke at an event with 300 women and women came up to me after and they said, I'm not going through what you're going through, but I lost a family member. And it's, it's all the same, same story. Um, and people, yeah, we're so good as humans of kind of hiding that, hiding it and getting through and being strong. But on the inside I'll speak for myself on the inside I was completely broken. Yeah. Yeah.
Speaker 1:
27:52
Well, it's great that you found the strength to just to share that. I wish more people would be a little bit more open about some of their hardships because I think there'd be a lot more healing that takes place by talking through it. You know, you can, you can do something with your body, with your spirit, with your mind that I think can reframe it and see it, change it from being a problem in your life, to being a teaching tool. Something now you can use to go be of service to other people and help them through their hardships. And then that kind of is, it's very empowering
Speaker 3:
28:22
and that's resilience right there. Like you just explained it so beautifully. Yeah, that's resilience. It's transforming. Allowing something to change you and not looking back at it as this terrible thing. I mean, it is a terrible thing that happened, but not being defined by that. Yeah. Giving yourself space to, to change and improve and pay it forward.
Speaker 1:
28:46
Yeah. And you're, and so now you're taking this concept now, so what are you doing, you know, day to day, are you, you're coaching, you're doing yoga, you're doing some, uh, you're an ambassador for Lululemon. You're doing, I mean, you're doing all of these different things. So kind of give me an overview on, you know, what is the day in the life of Mallory?
Speaker 3:
29:01
Yeah. So I wake up, usually my dogs wake me up and the dogs, they're two little rescue dogs. We have a puppy who is terrorizing my life. Um, but I love her. And then we have an almost six year old dog and their Chihuahua docks and cool maxes. Yeah. So I wake up with them. Um, I do some breathing exercises and I, I've had to learn how to just check in with myself every morning cause I used to just jump out of bed, you know, hop in the shower and go Concord the day. Yeah. So now I really have to be intentional. So I'm, I'll usually do a little journaling and I'll look at my day and I'll, um, prioritize. Okay, this is the most important thing. And that's also a new practice because I used to just do it all and we don't really, like I'll sleep when I'm dead.
Speaker 3:
29:51
Right. But yeah, so I go, I go about life a lot more intentionally now. And if I know I have something like a podcast, then I plan the rest of my day around it. Um, a lot of days I'll go see clients. So I used to work with eight to 12 clients a day, um, hour long sessions one-on-one. And now I do three or four. So I'll work with my clients, I do paperwork, um, and I'll do some social media and I'm really focusing the last month on my nutrition because that went completely out the window, um, post brain injury. So it's like, okay, I'm using a service called tailored bites for, there's a dietician and she creates my meal plan and then the meals get delivered to me. So that's just been the best spent in the food is really good. Like sweet potato brownies. That's all I'm going to say.
Speaker 3:
30:43
Wow. So good. Yeah. My curiosity. All right. Yeah. So, um, I'll make sure that I'm fueled throughout the day rather than just relying on caffeine like I used to. And I get in some movement every day and I work a lot on mobility right now just to help my joints help me to, I felt like my body aged 20 years in the last year and a half. Things that never hurt hurt now. So it's changed how I train too and spend a little time with my husband and go to a little lemon. It's right by my office. It's about a block away. So I go there pretty much every day. It's got so quarter. Yeah.
Speaker 1:
31:26
So I mean it sounds like you've had kind of a big transformation then. Yeah. You know, from Gogo go accomplish everything, knock everything down to uh, you know, being a little bit more intentional, a little bit more comfortable with the pause, taking, taking, you know, a morning kind of moment for gratitude or whatever, you know, whatever it is you do.
Speaker 3:
31:44
Yeah. And I still fall, you know, it's all habit. So I still fall back to like my, my original way of being, which was, you know, like maybe just not listened to my body and do way too much and then end up with a migraine and I'm like, wait, Oh yeah, I probably shouldn't have run 20 errands.
Speaker 1:
32:01
Yeah. Yeah. What about, you know, you're still, you're still kind of coming off of this transformation. What about the future? I mean, do you think five years from now you're kind of, you know, back at the same pace that you used to be at? Do you want that out of your future? You know, are you settling into this new kind of change in the way that you operate? What does that look like?
Speaker 3:
32:23
Yeah. So I mean, I've always had a five year plan and right now I don't, cause I don't know, um, that's been one of the really difficult things is, you know, I've always planned ahead and been really optimistic and, um, even today I'm still healing and I'm not 100% right. And so even right now I have to take things day by day. Um, you know, it's not like no matter how well I plan, I, I'm still not in control of how my brain decides to respond that day. So I mean, I'd love to say that five years from now I am doing X, Y and Z. I think what I'll say instead is that I'm just open to whatever happens through this process. I'm writing a book right now. Yeah. I'm working on um, online programmings that I have more flexibility through my day rather than working one on one with people in person. And I absolutely love the work that I do with Lulu lemon. I'd love to lead self-development programs for them down the road. Um, those are all things that I could see myself doing and I'd enjoy doing. And so there's a lot of coaching. Yeah. Hmm.
Speaker 1:
33:32
And, and I know you're big in, in yoga, right before we hopped on the air, you had mentioned, I've never heard this phrase, this pop up yoga studio. Can you tell me what that is? Cause I've never, I'm not obviously not familiar with it, but what does a pop up yoga studio?
Speaker 3:
33:45
I love it. Um, so my husband and I both have full time gigs. He's in the military active duty and his big dream has always been to own a yoga studio. Yoga has changed his life. He's been 26 years in the military. He was federal law enforcement until a medical retirement. So yogas saved his life and he loves to pass that on and share it. And so, um, a popup studio is what we do because we can't have a fulltime brick and mortar studio. Um, so we plan events, we love to bring people together and so we'll do, um, just events and we'll pop up so to speak, at different venues. So, um, last month we had one at Scottsdale quarter and one at Helio basin brewing. There's a restaurant in the Scott's airport called Velante. We do yoga on the runway there a lot. Um, we just love to bring people together and, and how fun and help people connect by sweating and trying something that scares them, getting out of their comfort zone. And, um, it's just a really great thing. And so a popup is how we are able to make that work with our full lives and, and everyone else's full life.
Speaker 1:
34:56
Yeah. And you're very passionate about it. You said, Hey, you should come to this event that is coming up. Then I'm going to ask you about pressure him to come. And I'm like, Oh, I'm super busy that day. Yeah, no, but you know, wash my hair, wash my hair. I have something important going on. I don't know what it is yet, but I'll find something. But yeah. So tell me about that. So it's, it's coming up, I think it's in March, right? Yeah, it's March 21st
Speaker 3:
35:21
it's at Helio basin brewing company and Brian's going to be teaching. He's such a fun teacher. Um, and it's just a yoga class and, or actually it's combat stretching that day.
Speaker 1:
35:33
Combat corruption. Yeah. So maybe I will go, yeah. Yeah. It's actually a free class
Speaker 3:
35:38
and we are taking donations for the love your brain foundation. And March is um, their campaign, they call it mindful March. So they do a variety of programs to raise funds to keep their yoga programs going through the year for TBI survivors and their caregivers. And if you aren't able to do the class on the 21st, then they also do a 31 day meditation challenge. So they'll email a five minute meditation to your inbox every day for the month of March. And you can meditate with people all around the world on your own time. And it's a really cool thing because even healthy brains need meditation.
Speaker 1:
36:19
Yeah, yeah. Meditation is, is amazing. It, it's taken me a long time to get into it, but I do it now every morning and there's something, there's something to it, I'm not sure what it is yet, but that's what they say. You just got to keep going and then you'll reach that, you know, a different level.
Speaker 3:
36:34
And I'll tell you a big secret. Yeah. So I used to hate yoga and meditation because I wasn't good at it. And I'd go into a class and I'd be like, everyone looks so peaceful and serene. And I was like, I am not peaceful and serene. Like I'm angry, I'm angry that my body doesn't want to do, you know, that triangle pose or whatever. And um, and then the, at the end, when you do Shavasana, when you take the extended rest, um, I lie on my mat and the teacher be like, you know, let your mind be playing, um, when a blah, blah, blah. And I'm like, my brain doesn't do that. Like this is a waste. I have so much on my to do list. I should just roll up my mat and bounce because
Speaker 1:
37:19
right. We're done. Right. We accomplished my goal today. Yeah.
Speaker 3:
37:22
Yeah. So if I can go from hating yoga, like literally hating yoga to teaching yoga. Yeah. There's, yeah, there's some of them.
Speaker 1:
37:33
There's something there. And I, I got, I mean probably like, you know, at least a handful of guests on here have said that same thing. And I, and I still don't, uh, don't do anything about it, but I did buy, I will tell you this, I did buy a yoga mat. It's sitting in my trunk. I have it still in the, in the wrapping. I haven't used it, but at least I got that. So yoga in the trunk could be kind of interesting. Yeah. Maybe that's where you host your next event. Yeah. Everybody, you know, bring your cars, pop your trunks open and, and go hard on it. So, all right, well, awesome. Well, where can people connect with you? So I know you've got, you know, like you said, you've got a lot of cool stuff coming out, you've got your book coming out, you've got some online programs coming out. Uh, you've got this event coming out on the 21st. What are some good places for people to follow you?
Speaker 3:
38:18
Let's see. Instagram. So I've had to really like get intentional about not just my life but you know, how do I connect with people. So Instagram is my, um, my priority right now and you can find me there. It's dr Foxy fit, said D R F O X, Y. F. I T. and um, I also like I'll post updates from my blog there, but my blog is be Foxy fit.com/lemon loves. And it is a play on Lulu lemon. You probably have realized them pretty much a little 11 addict and um, so it's the different tenants of sweat and connect and growth. So, um, I do highlight a lot of Lou lemon product on it just because I'm obsessed. Like I'm wearing a Lou lemon dress. Right?
Speaker 1:
39:03
Yeah. Tell me about that. What is an ambassador for Lulu lemon? So yeah, so what does that involve?
Speaker 3:
39:08
So it's a community partner. Um, there are six of us at the Scottsdale quarter store and so we have a partnership with the store and they do a lot of community based outreach events. And so they'll ask us where their go to people to host or to teach for them and just to bring people together in sweat and look and look cute doing it.
Speaker 1:
39:33
Acute. Yeah. I'm a huge Lou lemon fan. I love what they're doing for the whole world. So yeah, they're, I think they're doing that. They're doing it for the right. A lot of really good reasons. We've mentioned, you know, my, my other coach I was telling you about, I know he does work with them and yeah, and everybody's really good people. So you're in good company.
Speaker 3:
39:50
It's so much more than the strategy balance. Yeah. That's what I tell people. It really is about the community and the self development and there they make the world a better place. Yeah. They've helped me grow so much.
Speaker 1:
40:01
That's great. And you're doing, you're giving back. You're, you're paying that forward. If we all did that, I know. Look it happened. Well, we're doing our part, we're telling the world to be of service and share their stories and give back. And so, all right, so you've got a couple of places for people to find you. You've got your website, be Foxy fit.com you've got be Foxy fit.com/lemon Love's, which is the blog. Yeah, and I know you're getting more active with that. I think you're kind of making that intentional as of this year. Then everybody should obviously connect with you on Instagram at dr Foxy fit and then you and your husband will be hosting an event on March 21st 10:00 AM hello a Helio basin brewing company, which is over right on 40th street and Thomas sounds like it's going to be great. I'm going to do my best to be there. I'm sure. I'm sure you'll uh, remind me about that, but anything else? Anything else we didn't get to? I think that's it. Yeah. I'm really glad you, I'm glad you came on. Thank you for sharing your story and I look forward to following you along. That's Mallory Fox. Thanks again Mallory.
Speaker 3:
41:05
Thank you.
Speaker 2:
41:08
The ruler nation podcast is brought to you by the R and R law group. Arizona's premier criminal defense and personal injury law firm available@wwwdotrrlawaz.com or give us a call, four eight zero four zero zero one three.
×

Listen to this podcast on