Gruler Nation Podcast

Episode #89: The History and Making of Artisanal Mezcal with Ivan Carreño

February 21, 2020 Robert F. Gruler Jr., Esq.
Gruler Nation Podcast
Episode #89: The History and Making of Artisanal Mezcal with Ivan Carreño
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Gruler Nation Podcast
Episode #89: The History and Making of Artisanal Mezcal with Ivan Carreño
Feb 21, 2020
Robert F. Gruler Jr., Esq.

On episode #89 of the Gruler Nation Podcast I had the pleasure of speaking with Ivan Carreño! Ivan is the owner of Mezcal Carreño, a brand of artisanal mezcal that the Carreño family has been producing since 1904. The Carreño family began producing mezcal in Oaxaca Mexico, using traditional and sacred techniques passed down from generation to generation. 

 

Ivan is driven by his family's culture, history, and heritage and is excited to launch Mezcal Carreño in Arizona. Ivan has a passion for bringing people together, enjoying the moment, and sharing life experiences which resonates with the meaning of mezcal valued by families of Oaxaca. Ivan inspires to build a culture bridge from the Central Valleys of Oaxaca to Arizona through mezcal, art, food, and history!  

 

Today also marks their ONE YEAR anniversary!! So, be sure to follow Ivan and Mezcal Carreño along their journey by following them @mezcalcarreñous and check out his website to learn more about mezcal, Ivan's story, and their upcoming news and events at www.mezcalcarrenous.com

Please Like, Subscribe, and Comment below! 

 

#mezcalcarreño #mezcal #tequila #drinkmezcal #artisanalmezcal #arizona #culture #oaxaca #mexico #food #history #art #drinking #sharing #entrepreneur #podcast #InspirationwithGrulerNation #inspire #gruler #inspiration #GrulerNation #GrulerNationPodcast #gnp #arizonapodcast #scottsdale #yesphx #phx  

 

The Gruler Nation Podcast is a show that focuses on conversations with interesting "Level 10" people passionate about changing the world with their work, relationships and ideas. The show is hosted by Robert Gruler, an attorney and founding partner of the R&R Law Group, a criminal defense law firm based in Scottsdale, Arizona focused on helping good people charged with crimes move forward with their lives.   

 

Interested in being on the show or have a guest recommendation? Email Robert directly at robert@rrlawaz.com or visit www.robgruler.com for more information.  

Show Notes Transcript

On episode #89 of the Gruler Nation Podcast I had the pleasure of speaking with Ivan Carreño! Ivan is the owner of Mezcal Carreño, a brand of artisanal mezcal that the Carreño family has been producing since 1904. The Carreño family began producing mezcal in Oaxaca Mexico, using traditional and sacred techniques passed down from generation to generation. 

 

Ivan is driven by his family's culture, history, and heritage and is excited to launch Mezcal Carreño in Arizona. Ivan has a passion for bringing people together, enjoying the moment, and sharing life experiences which resonates with the meaning of mezcal valued by families of Oaxaca. Ivan inspires to build a culture bridge from the Central Valleys of Oaxaca to Arizona through mezcal, art, food, and history!  

 

Today also marks their ONE YEAR anniversary!! So, be sure to follow Ivan and Mezcal Carreño along their journey by following them @mezcalcarreñous and check out his website to learn more about mezcal, Ivan's story, and their upcoming news and events at www.mezcalcarrenous.com

Please Like, Subscribe, and Comment below! 

 

#mezcalcarreño #mezcal #tequila #drinkmezcal #artisanalmezcal #arizona #culture #oaxaca #mexico #food #history #art #drinking #sharing #entrepreneur #podcast #InspirationwithGrulerNation #inspire #gruler #inspiration #GrulerNation #GrulerNationPodcast #gnp #arizonapodcast #scottsdale #yesphx #phx  

 

The Gruler Nation Podcast is a show that focuses on conversations with interesting "Level 10" people passionate about changing the world with their work, relationships and ideas. The show is hosted by Robert Gruler, an attorney and founding partner of the R&R Law Group, a criminal defense law firm based in Scottsdale, Arizona focused on helping good people charged with crimes move forward with their lives.   

 

Interested in being on the show or have a guest recommendation? Email Robert directly at robert@rrlawaz.com or visit www.robgruler.com for more information.  

Support the show (https://www.ericshouse.org/donate/)

Speaker 1:

[inaudible].

Speaker 2:

This is episode 89 of the Gruler Nation Podcast. My name is Robert Gruler joined today by Ivan Carreno of mezcal carreno U.S. Let me tell you a little bit about him. So Ivan is the owner of mezcal, Carreno, U.S. And if I'm pronouncing that incorrectly, I'm sure he'll correct me here shortly, but that is the U S arm for import porting and distributing a brand of mezcal that his family has been producing since 1904

Speaker 1:

they're here in Arizona now. They're launching this podcast is going to be very interesting. We have a lot of different things that we're going to cover. Some show Intel pieces. We've got, what are these here? These are chapolines. Okay. And that is a, that's kind of like a delicacy. Delicacy. It's almost like, think of it like a beer nuts. That's something that you normally just channel off chomp on and unlocking it. It looks very interesting. We're going to dive into that a little bit shortly here. But before we, we dive into this, I want to know a little bit more about what mezcal is cause I've never actually heard of it and we talked a little bit about this before we hopped on here. Um, what we were just talking about. Kind of describe that again for the audience. Yeah, for sure. Uh, first of all, thank you very much for inviting us to be on this app podcast with you today, Robert.

Speaker 1:

Um, we're super proud and grateful to be on. Um, but yeah, let's dive into it. Um, his scowl is kind of, um, a term I like to call it a father umbrella, uh, for a distillate, uh, [inaudible]. So if you think of it like wine, I like to use the example of wine. It's like the wine of spirits. A wine is a father umbrella. And underneath that father umbrella, there's different varietals, different species of grapes that you can get. You can get like Pinot noir, uh, Sharat champagne, Sauvignon Blanc, Marlow blends. You can do different things. But the overall arching umbrella is wine.

Speaker 1:

And that wine umbrella, there's one grape that's kind of more like a diagonal instead of right below it. And it's that Pinot noir grape. Um, if it comes from the Northern part of France, then it has to be called champagne. You can't call it wine. Uh, it's got a specific denomination of origin, which means location of where it comes from place, uh, traditional methods of how they do it and, and uh, that overall encompasses that. So there is one a Gabi, um, that a lot of people know it's got a lot of marketing dollars behind it. It's been around for quite awhile and it's called the blue Weber I gave him, um, for the Moscow, that's the peanut and grape or champion that it is to us because it's kind of off diagonal. Okay. It's got its own denomination of origin. And so with the location of where it comes from, the way it gets made, and so that is the blue Webber, tequila, Gavi.

Speaker 1:

So all tequila must get made from that. So all tequila in essence is a type of mess. Gal ms gal is the father umbrella. And underneath that there's over 300 different varietals of I Gabi. Interesting. Yeah, it's wild. I mean, I used to be a huge drinker. People who listen to the podcast know that I don't drink anymore. But, uh, but I was a big drinker and I tried everything. You know, I was, I said I was PR, I had a career drinking. I was a professional drinker cause I, that's how much I was drinking. But I had never heard of it. I mean, I've never, I've never heard of it for some reason. Is that, uh, is that common? I mean, is it, is this something that's kind newer to the States? This is a, this is the type of interaction that I love.

Speaker 1:

I love to teach people about, especially people that haven't heard of it. Um, it's, it's very, very common. Um, sometimes we'll go to restaurants and we'll be like, Hey, uh, do you have mezcal? And you know, the several will be like, um, I don't know if we have mosquito, let me go check. And I'm like, no, not Moscato. Like this gal. She goes, um, we have to Keela. And I'm like, no, no, no, no, no. I'm like, nevermind. You're okay. Um, so don't, don't feel bad about it. Like, what was I doing out there? It is the oldest spirit in the Americas. Okay. Uh, so Moscow's traditionally you'll the spirit in the Americas, it's things that have been around for generations and centuries. Um, with us down, at least in Wahaca, I'm originally from Wahaca, which is one of 10 States that have a denomination of origin from a scow and 80% of the world's ms, um, comes from Wahaca.

Speaker 1:

It's got seven distinct different geographical regions. Um, so it's very diverse, biodiverse and, uh, that imparts a lot of those different flavors into the mosquitoes that get made in those different regions. And how did your family, you know, get into this? So this, you've been producing it since 1904, kind of give us some background on the origin story. Yeah, definitely. Uh, so everything started with my great grandfather, uh, a balloon [inaudible]. Um, he ended up amassing 1500 acres through a small shipping company. They had, they found a iron ore and one of the mines, uh, close to town. Um, and so they would, uh, these Canadians that bought the rights to the mine, um, would pay my grandfather one peso, uh, back in 1904 to take a cartload of iron to the main city of Wahaca. Um, the main city of Wahaca to where we're at, which is Sandhya and eco Oakland is about an hour away now by car.

Speaker 1:

But back then it used to take them a week, uh, with two oxen in the cart. Um, so he would make a peso. And so he ended up subcontracting the work. He ended up amassing 1500 acres. And what we were in the actual business of doing was growing sugarcane and producing the sugar cane into molasses and selling that to the Bacardi family of Mexico. Okay. So that's what we were doing. Um, but with all the acreages that he had, my grandfather had all of these [inaudible] on his property. So he said, I want to produce Moscow. And so he produced ms gallon. So ms Schell traditionally used to be illegal as well. And I'll touch on that in a second. So it wasn't anything that was always kind of brought around. And because it's not a like a spirit that you want to just kind of like have, Oh, it's like a Wednesday, three o'clock.

Speaker 1:

It's not anything like you're just going to be drinking like a casual beer. Yeah. It's a celebratory spirit that comes out normally for like a wedding, a quinceanera, um, a baby shower. Uh, you bought a house, you got a job promotion and it's like that. It's, it's definitely a top shelf spirit that it's meant to be sipped and enjoyed. So nothing that you're going to like want to just chug a bottle of [inaudible]. And so your family, that's, that's how it started. So that's how it started. We would actually only, my grandfather would only have three big parties in the, in one year. Um, and he would have a birthday party in February. And so that was number one in April when we would plant the sugarcane as a kind of like a please, God's let, let the sugar King grow really well. And then in October when we would harvest a sugar cane as a thank you, that's when we would throw those big parties and that's when he would, and the sugar cane doesn't have anything to do with the actual production of the Moscow.

Speaker 1:

No, no. The sugar cane doesn't have anything to do with it. That's what we are in the legit business of doing. Because ms scow traditionally used to be illegal. It used to be illegal when the King of Spain was trying to conquer the new world and he was trying to send Brandy and he was trying to send wine over to make tax money to make tax revenue. And so the natives in Mexico were like, no, you know, we don't want wine. We don't want brand-new. We're, we're good with miss galleon. He goes, no, you have to buy them. We're like, no, no, thank you. And he said, well, what are you guys drinking? We said, well, Moscow. And then he said, well, ms gal's now illegal and so now you have to buy my products. And so that's kind of how it started. And so I went underground, became kind of clandestine.

Speaker 1:

And so when did your family transition? Your family produces it? Yes. Um, so we didn't actually, so what happened was is, and I'll tell you a little more about them. My grandfather had a 12 children, um, because he had a lot of acreages. He needed a lot of cheaply, hands in a lot of hands. Yeah. And, uh, traditionally in Hispanic culture, the youngest, whether it's a boy or a girl, they always stay with family and kind of see the family pass on and they end up usually keeping the house. That was my grandfather, uh, [inaudible] and so he was the youngest and, um, continued on with the sugar cane production business and better himself. Um, kind of didn't want a big family, but ended up kinda just, um, getting one. Um, he just wanted three boys. That's what he wanted to focus on. So he had this a beautiful wedding with my grandmother, kind of just put her on the back of a horse, rode off into the sunset, promised her a couple of things, promised her that he would never look at another girl again.

Speaker 1:

She was going to be the queen for everything. And uh, she would have everything that he owned, everything would be hers. Um, the only thing he would need from her was three boys. Cause that's how you kind of leave the legacy and Hispanic culture. That's kind of important. They agreed and at the story was girl, boy, boy. And then they said, cool, just one more boy. And then we get stopped. And then it went girl, girl, girl, girl, girl, girl. Finally the 10th was a boy. So they finally stopped. Um, and so, um, same thing. Ms Gowe still was illegal. Um, so we would have it for parties and things of that nature. Um, uh, my grandfather ended up, um, passing away. Uh, and so when he passed away, before he passed away, uh, my great grandfather was like, Hey, I commend you for really sticking to your guns on that.

Speaker 1:

So he said, we're going to model the lineup after your children. So the lineup that we have is a four expressions, three that are called mano bridles, which represent one of the boys. And then we have the only unique blend of seven to represent the seven ladies of our family. And that's how we package up our family and showcase our family. Um, we didn't, uh, start producing, uh, or start selling to say, uh, till about 2009. Um, my aunt, um, she's a very forward thinker and just because my grandfather was a forward thinker, he would always, um, kind of install on them. He would always tell them, Hey, make sure you go out and get an education. Don't just become a farmer. Don't just become a farmer's wife. Don't just do what I did to be better than I did. Um, and so kind of they took that to heart.

Speaker 1:

They did get educations. Um, and my aunt, um, in 2009, um, my grandma was getting a little bit older and she said, I would never want you guys to fight over the land. I have 120 acres that your grandfather left us. Um, let's divvy it up now. That way everybody's knowing what I want to do with my land and give it to you guys. And so you guys don't fight. And we would never fight over it anyways just because we're a very close family. So the 10 kids ended up getting about 10 acres each. Uh, grandma kept 10 for herself and we started rebuilding a, what's called the Hacienda or the ranch, the Rancho, um, in Sunday. Nesio and uh, that's kinda what it was. Grandma said, Hey, free reign, do whatever it is you wanna do with your acreage is if you want to sell it, if you want to give it to your kids, whatever you want to do, you want to work it.

Speaker 1:

Um, and so my aunt being the forward thinker that she is, she's amazing. [inaudible] she said, Hey, why don't we go back to what we know and we'll start getting our certification papers. We'll start getting everything online, um, to kind of produce ms Gallan kind of show the world, you know, what will Hawk is all about. And so that's what we did. Um, it took her about five years to get all of the certifications and paperwork that she needed. And, um, we started selling in Wahaca Kenco in Porto, aorta and, um, Mexico city. However, Mexico has a crazy, crazy tax law, so it's 63% per bottle. Wow. So yeah, I'd taken off the top there, taken off the top, and that's for the government. So, um, they ended up, uh, our, our main focuses is the exporting business. Um, we fell into it and when I say we, um, he's not here right now, but now my business partner and best friend, uh, pretty much brother at this point able Arriaga.

Speaker 1:

Um, we, we grew up together, best friends. I was the best man at his wedding. And, uh, I introduced him to Mischelle because there's, there's a saying in the mezcal world, it's called, you don't find Mischelle ms finds you. And we had three times that it found him and not until the third time, kinda third star, third tens, uh, the striker, the charm. That's when we decided, or he decided to tell me about it. The first time I had brought it back. Uh, and because it being a celebratory spirit, we were having a party. He was a 20, 21. I was 19, I think. And I had just gotten back from a trip and I had it, uh, we had smuggled some back in a Coca Cola, a two liter bottle, and it's on my mom. And I was like, Hey, bill is having a party.

Speaker 1:

I'm going to go, I'm going to take, um, some miscounts share with my friends. And she's like, all right, just take a little bit of it. Don't take all of it. And so I put it in a Disani water bottle and it was just the wrong setting, trying to give it to, you know, a younger crowd crowd that wasn't appreciative. And back then I think we were drinking Hennessy hypnotic and bud light, cause that's all we could afford back then as well too. Right. And, uh, so I brought it out, nobody liked it. And so I'm finally like, the party was getting over April, put himself to bed. I went to go check on him. Um, I put the bottle on top of the TV stand and I went to go make sure the house was all locked up. I came back in and I found him in the corner just dripping wet and he's looking like Gollum from Lord of the rings.

Speaker 1:

It's like, yeah, that's not water. And I looked at the, at the bottle and it was half gone and I was like, Oh my God, I knew what you did. So he chugged it like a mad man thinking it was water cause he was like, Oh my God, water. Thank you. And so he couldn't drink Disani for like a year after that. Um, it was, it was just one of those things that anytime I would say Mischelle or anything, he's like, Nope, get away, you know, like nothing like that. So it was his first time, um, his second time I got invited to my cousin's wedding, beautiful wedding. Um, in Wahaca city, the, the uh, churches called [inaudible] Santo Domingo right in the middle of town. It's the most beautiful church. It's got a gold inlaid alter. They have like a three year waiting list for weddings. And my cousin got a call and she's like, Hey, somebody dropped out, can you do this in six months?

Speaker 1:

And she like planned it all out. And uh, she gave me a plus one and I said, I'm going to bring my best friend, I want to show him where I'm from and show my culture and my heritage. And then this is, this'll be the perfect time. My dad was given the task. Um, traditionally you don't shoot miscount you sip on it. But my dad, after a celebration like that, you would have a shot. He was given the task because he doesn't drink and everybody knows that. So he was given the task to get people when they're coming out of the church, a shout of Moscow. And so he chased down table, um, and he goes, Hey, you're my son's best friend. You're coming here from Phoenix. You have to have a shot. And he was like, no, no, no. Like I can't, like, I've already, but he couldn't really speak the language or anything.

Speaker 1:

So he's a like, Oh man, I have to do it. You know? So he did it and he goes, well that's not bad. And so now he's 25 he's not, you know, at a party, you know, when, when it's a house party and you're drinking bud light, he's, you know, he's celebrating and he's experiencing Wahaca what will hoc has to offer. And he's like, that was pretty cool. So he's like trying to find me. And so he runs into my uncle who had been here a couple months prior and they went to a Cardinals game together for Christmas and they had bonded. And so he goes, Hey, you have to have a shot with me. And he's like, no, no. I just had him with, with a Ivan's dad. And he's like, well, sorry, that was Ivan's dad. You have to have shot with me. So we had another one and then he's running off to tell me and he finally finds me and I'm having our celebrative three cousins shot with all of my cousins.

Speaker 1:

So he walks into three shots in under five minutes. But it was a different kind of scenario and he liked to, uh, appreciate it. So it was kind of like the middle point. The third time when he had it was I had a, I, I'm the oldest. Um, as far as my brothers that are here, I'm actually one of 10 as well, myself. And, uh, my younger brother, I told him if he graduated high school, um, I would take him anywhere on an a trip. And so, um, I, he chose Cancun. I said, cool, let's go. And I invited Abel and at first he couldn't go. He had just gotten married. He was kind of in the middle of all of that moving and kind of dealing with that life. And so like two weeks before he goes, Hey, would you mind if I go?

Speaker 1:

And I was like, no, absolutely. Like I want you to go. And so we went and my uncle, uh, hosted us. It was a beautiful trip and amazing trip. As soon as we got there, he and ended up buying an extra car to let us drive around. And so he's, he's taking able, cause like I said, they bonded. So he's taken Abel and he's showing him Cancun and he's like, this is the 18 and over hotel. This is a 21 and over hotel. This is like the couple's hotel. This is like the old people will tell, he's like, this is like a swingers. So Ables eyes are like lighting up. It's like Vegas for the first time. And so it's like, it's, it's off the charts. It's like Vegas but in Mexico. And so we go to a restaurant called Makamba, which is ran by one of my uncle's best friends.

Speaker 1:

He's a GM there and he sits us down where it right in the middle of the restaurant, which the waves are breaking, you know, on the restaurant wall cause it's not inside of a hotel. It's kind of like right on the water. And um, there was a saxophonist that was playing and he's playing some Kenny G, he's a world renowned saxophonist from San Diego who missed his flight, went to the restaurant, said, Hey, if you guys feed me, I'll play for a couple of hours. So we're in there. Beautiful day. Just amazing. Um, and so I've got my, uh, my best friend, my uncle has two kids, my brother, my little brother's best friend and another friend of ours. And so it's this, uh, dinner of just friends, family, it, good time, good place and everything. And they bring out a couple of bottles of miss Galan. He goes, I don't even have to explain anything to you guys.

Speaker 1:

It's your guys product. But the bartender comes over and he goes, Hey, I just won a competition last week with your my scalp. Can I make you the cocktail? And we're like, yeah, absolutely. So it comes out and they set it down right in front of Abel. And Abel likes to talk a lot. And so when he came down, he just kind of like clammed up. He didn't say anything and I didn't really pay any attention to that cause we were having fun. Um, but what happened was, is he saw like a light on the cocktail and he kinda was like looking up and he goes, man, they know where to put your cocktail so that it accentuates it so you drink more. So you consume more and stuff. And he's like looking around, looking around. But he doesn't have any of those because it was a palapa roof.

Speaker 1:

It was made out of Palm trees, uh, leaps. Okay. And so just the time of day, the place we were at the table, the seat he was at and the direction of the sun, there was a little pinhole needle on the roof and it's shined a beam onto his cocktail. And that's when he said, I want to share this moment with everybody back home. And so that's when he told me about it afterwards and he said, Hey, what do you think? Um, you know, he's got the business degree, he's a marketing genius and he, he's got all that and I've got the culture, the heritage, the last name on the bottle. And so we just compliment each other on the things that we don't have that will work well with, with what the other has.

Speaker 2:

That's awesome. What a great story. Yeah, it's weird how those things, how those business relationships work. That's kind of a similar story between uh, myself and my business partner. Not, I mean, not actually, it's actually not similar at all, but you know, it's kind of serendipitous, right? How you, you, you just, you find somebody and you're both at the right spot at the right time and it just makes a lot of sense. And it sounds like you, and it sounds like it's going very well, right? So you're breaking into the Arizona market and you're, you're establishing all these relationships and we were speaking a little bit about it before we hopped on, but I mean you're, you're putting everything that you've gotten into this, this is your family, this is your, your legacy. This is extremely important to you. And I wanted to kind of, you touched on it briefly, but I wanted to dive into it just a little bit more. You were talking about the different varieties and the different, uh, like the rationale, the symbolism behind that.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, so different varietals of, um, and varietals like names. So like I was saying, the one is spirits. Think of it like a red grape, a white grape, and the differences there, they're in as well too. Um, so out of the 300 different [inaudible] is not all of them have a high concentration of sugar, only about 30 of them have that. Um, and when I say about 30 of them, there's really no set like map for them. Um, and the reason why is was Wahaca because it's so diverse. Um, towns are spread out a little bit in this town. They might call it Largo or they might call it [inaudible] or, um, [inaudible] or something like that. And then the town over, it's kind of the same [inaudible] and they might call it the lessee chair. Um, so they're starting to differentiate all of that. Um, it didn't get its denomination of origin and, and uh, didn't get kind of what's called a governing body until 1995 because it used to be illegal.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yup. And so, um, CRM is the governing board, which is called the [inaudible]. So they're the ones that govern everything and they make, they make all the laws for it and they have to like inspect all your bottles. Um, and whenever you're going to go ahead and ship out, they, each batch batch or lot a gets sent off into like a, um, to do testings to make sure that it's not an adulthood spirit or anything like that. And then they'll give you a seal of certification that you can definitely export or you can sell that product. But, so you said you had

Speaker 2:

three different varieties for the three boys? Correct. And then you had, you had the fourth one, which was the other seven children.

Speaker 1:

Correct. So, um, so great grandfather said we're going to do the lineup after, after the, the children that my grandfather had. Right. Um, and so he had the three boys. And so we've got three that are called mono varietals, meaning that there's only one specific species of a GABA in the bottle. And those represent each of the boys. Okay. So we've got a tow Balaam, which takes anywhere from 10 to 15 years on average to grow and mature in the wild. We've got a [inaudible] which grows 12 to 14 years. And then we've got a [inaudible] day is a 25 to 35 year old Gabi. And so each of that specific Avia is in each of those bottles. So you're not going to get anything else in that bottle other than that varietal. So think of it just like a, just a Merlow, just, um, Sauvignon Blanc and then just a, um, shot.

Speaker 1:

Okay. And so like that. And then we have the other one, the last one, which is the ensemble of seven. Uh, so the ensemble of seven was a made for the seven ladies that we have in the family. Could, we had three boys and then seven girls. So the ensemble of seven has seven Wilder Galvez all cooked together, mashed together, fermented together, and is still together to create a unique one of a kind spirit to represent the ladies and all in equal weights as well to, um, we've been blessed. Um, the ensemble of seven has just one third place for the state of Wahaca. Wow. Yeah. Out of a competition of 369 competing brands. Um, and there's no other company out there that it has an ensemble of seven.

Speaker 2:

Wow. That's awesome man. What a great story. And I love the symbolism. I mean, everything's being done with intention, with focus. You're not just creating these one off things that have really no meaning behind them. It all ties directly back to your story. And that just makes it that much more cool. Is it that you're, you're drinking kind of a, a product that eh, that's been through all of, you know, all of the story that you just shared. So I love that. Um, why don't you just show us a bottle? So why don't you just grab one and throw it on camera? Cause I can't, I can't see it on this one. So put it right here in front of this one. So, um, yeah, it's a, it's a good looking bottle. And, um, you want me to touch on the bottle for the bottle? If you yeah, I'm sure there's some thought behind.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, there is. So it's a very, very unique bottle. The bottle was inspired off of Zappa tech royalty. So a Wahaca is that protect culture, uh, which is pre Hispanic and pre-Columbian right now, over 2000 years old. Um, and in the temple, which is called Montello, and it's right in the middle of town. It was, um, where all of those Apotex Kings are buried. So think of it like the pyramids of Egypt, right? All the Kings were buried there and there's over 170 Kingsbury there. Um, and so, uh, inside one of the King's chambers, they found a cup that had these little round nubs all around it. And that's where we got our inspiration for our bottle, uh, because they call miss Gow a gift that the gods, uh, the actual God was, has been used for like the, the thorns, um, can be used just so, um, the, I got the fibers on the leaves can be used to make rope. Can we make, to use clothing? It can be used for food, it can be used for alcohol, it could be used for so many different things. So it's literally a gift from the gods. And so they call it, uh, the drink of the gods. And so, um, we got an inspiration for that. So when you're drinking Mischelle Karanja you're drinking the gods juice out of a King's cup.

Speaker 2:

Wow. Yup. Yeah, I love that. Yeah. Very, very cool. Very interesting. And you know, what I like about that is that it's there, it's very authentic. You know, there's a lot, there's hundreds of brands and thousands of different bottles and things like that, but you know, a lot of it just doesn't, it doesn't seem like it has that much thought. And I love the authenticity of it. Well you've got, you've brought some other things here also.

Speaker 1:

I do, I've got some other things in Emma. I'm hoping though, the one thing that you'll try here is, is, um, if you can see it on camera, I brought some chapel leanness. Um, so Chaplin is, are basically grasshoppers. Um, they get toasted over vertical model. Um, what's a little bit of salt and Sheila spice. Okay. Uh, they're a delicacy. They're expensive, but they're super high in protein and they're about as clean as you can get. Right. All they eat is just that meat by which is just like corn. Um, so they're out there just catching them on the cornfields with these big nets. And so then, uh, you just toast them and you just kinda just grab a couple and you just kinda toss them.

Speaker 2:

I don't know if I'll grab a couple of, I'll try one.

Speaker 3:

Okay.

Speaker 2:

All right. So this is a grasshopper and it's a chapel Lita. It's a Chaplin chapel lean. So let's hold this up to the camera, man. This is making history for me. All right, ready? Yeah. Oh wow. It's actually not bad at all.

Speaker 1:

No, it's really good. Yeah, it's super high in protein. Um, it, can you remember, do you remember those little little cigarette packs that looked like cigarettes, but it was like beef jerky? Yeah. That's kind of what it tastes like.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I'm processing it. It's, it doesn't taste like anything I've ever tasted, but

Speaker 1:

it kind of resembles, I want to say kind of like fruity, maybe like a, like a tart fruit. I don't know what it is, but that's my first grasshopper. That's awesome. My first experience with the grasshopper, well that's, that's the, that's the cool thing about it. These are the types of moments that we like to cherish, um, with when we get to meet new people and we get to experience ms Gowe for the first time. You get to experience a grasshopper, you get to experience all of the things that while has to offer that to me. Um, you know, it really wasn't anything new because this is, like I said, our culture. Um, a lot of people are right now they're like, Oh, ms Gowe so hip and trendy. Like, it's so cool. And I'm like, no, ms gal has been around for thousands of years. It's culture, it's heritage.

Speaker 1:

It's, it's basically like the soul of Mexico. Like we've had it. It's just now people are finding out about it. And the reason they're finding out about it is because of this whole movement, right? Everything organic. I want to know what I'm putting in my body. I want to make sure that, you know, buying local, I want to make sure that, you know, it's not, you know, you, you're not going to McDonald's. A lot of people aren't going to McDonald's anymore, right? You can get meat at McDonald's inside of a burger or you can go down the road to a, a local spot, you know, and get an awesome burger that they, um, grounded up the meat themselves. They might, and they've done it with love and passion. And so that's where it's, where it's going with that. And that's why people are finding out about Mischelle because a lot of miss gal is still 100% all organic.

Speaker 1:

There's a lot of great qualities to it. They holistically give it to type two diabetics in the morning to help stabilize their glucose levels, um, to, for pregnant women to give it to pregnant women after they give birth for 40 days to help their bodies get back. Right. Wow. Um, if your son or daughter or baby is sick and he's got a cold or a fever, you run him a really warm bathwater and you put about an ounce of ms, the warm bath water, and you give them a bath. Interesting. Yeah, so it's a, it's like I said, it's a drink of the gods. It was used to have only been drinking by Kings and priests for ceremonies and special things, but now they're finding out a lot about these things and like for example, I don't know about these because there's not, there hasn't been a lot of science behind it.

Speaker 1:

Right. I said it didn't get, it's, it's day two, 1995. Right. But like for example, if I ever used to have a tummy ache when I was little, my mom would always just go to her garden and she always kept the garden. She would always get mint from her garden. She would boil it in water, she'd strain it, make a little bit of a tea, put a little bit of honey. So I would drink it and 10 minutes later, no stomach ache, right? It's just a plant that came from the earth and she just cooked it. And that's it. That's basically the process that we do with, with that guy van Miska. You, you rip up the year, you're a Gabby, you chop off all the leaves, which are the bank us because nature's very, very cool of designing things, right? Like for example, we have, we have, um, eyelashes and, and um, so when you blink and things, you get dirt, you don't get dirt in your eyes.

Speaker 1:

Um, and that was a design of how we were made. Sure. The [inaudible] is, are very, very rich inside of their core with sugar and sugar convert style call. But sugar is also liked by animals. So nature's way of protecting it's very sugary rich core was to create long, bitter arms with borns on it. So horses and ha and cows and [inaudible], they couldn't just come and eat the garbage so it can actually live on, cause it only lifts once each. A Gavi only lives once and it takes so long for them to live decades. Exactly. And so what will happen is this, um, it'll be a female plant for most of its life until it has enough sugars in enough energy to reproduce. So what it'll do is it'll pull all of the sugars into its core. It'll sprout up what's called a [inaudible], which is a stock that comes right out of the metal, can grow to a foot, a Dame. All of the sugars will get propelled up the [inaudible], it'll create, uh, flowers with a nectar, um, that'll get pollinated by bats. And then, um, it'll open up and drop seeds about 10,000 seeds each time, maybe one to maybe two will Germany, everything will get eaten by insects, um, or birds. And so that's, that's kind of the reproduction that, that further you, they got this.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Wow. It's, it's interesting. I mean I'm, I'm just kind of like in awe about, you know, this whole a, this whole brand of alcohol that I had no, no idea existed. How does the taste, it's difficult to talk about on a podcast, but how does it kind of compare maybe to a tequila or something that, that's a close cousin?

Speaker 1:

Um, it, it varies. Um, a lot of people think of it like a quote unquote smokey. They say it's smoky and that's very true, but that's, that's just a byproduct of how it gets made. Um, so because I said it was the oldest spirit in the Americas. Nowadays we have one autoclaves um, vapor rooms, they can cook them with vapor and things of that nature. Um, but before that we didn't have that. And so what happens is you have a, a hole underneath the ground, which is in a conical shape form. Um, and so you get a good fire going in there. With wood, you lay a layer of base rock, then you let put a layer of bagasse which has already squeezed out, got the fibers, and then you use your hearts, your cortisones, your penis. Um, and he looked like artichokes when you're done with them and you have to open them, uh, in half to make sure that there's no rot.

Speaker 1:

And so they cook evenly as well too. So you get your, your hearts and you start stacking them, you make a little pyramid mound and then you cover that pyramid mound with the tarp. And then you put about two feet of dirt on top of it. And so you let it sit there and smoke for about five days. So that's where you want the smoky flavor. Yeah. But each different variety is going to have different notes. And that's the coolest part about it. I'm going to give you another analogy because I like, I like to explain things like that for people specifically that haven't really delve into it. Um, if you think of it instead of thinking of it like in, in varietal terms, if you think about it as proteins. So if you think about chicken, steak, lobster, scallops, shrimp, different proteins, right? Outcome.

Speaker 1:

Um, the blue Weber, which is the, that tequila one. If you think of that as chicken, then you know that it, tequila is always going to be just chicken for you because it's one of those things where it has to just come from just a blue Weber. So it's always chicken. But with chicken, if you have to eat it for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, you're going to have to bake it, grill it, you're going to have to deep fry it. You're gonna have to be chicken fingers. You're gonna think different things because at the end of the day, it's just chicken. I don't have just chicken. We have the steak, the lobster, the scallops, the shrimp, the lamb. We have different flavor profiles to do that. Um, that's one of the reasons why ours are not on nickel as well to offer this lineup. It's just an all Hoven because, um, the, you know, the tequila ones, they have to change the different profiles to make it taste on how the maker wants it to be.

Speaker 1:

And they use French Oak, American Oak and things of that nature. And people say, why don't you do a Reposado? Why don't you do anything eco? And I'm like, why would I take a plant that sat in nature for 25 years, which is like the steak and try to make my steak tastes like chicken. Right. Yeah. Right. Yeah. That's a great analogy. And it does. It does make a lot of sense when you explain it that way. What about how, how has the process been, you know, bringing a new product to a, to a Mark, to a market that doesn't know anything about it? Oh man, that's a tough question. It's, it's, it's been an uphill battle. And then the last, I mean, it's, it's tough. Uh, there's a lot of reasons why, because it's tough because we were never industry guys, right? Uh, my regular job isn't an it job over the phone.

Speaker 1:

Um, and so we've always sat on this side of the bar, right? We didn't know what it took to be on that side of the bar. And, um, it's man dealing with like TTB, dealing with the government, dealing with, um, the customs agents, dealing with storage, dealing with the government or the state government here to get your license and everything. And then trying to compete against these brands that, you know, patroned era dura Ricardi that have millions of millions of dollars. It's one of those tough things, but I think we, we've, uh, we've been blessed in the community, um, where people know our names, they know our product. You know, we're out there giving our faces out, we're standing behind a product and they're giving us a shot. A lot of these places are actually giving us a shot. We've got a lot of like the big, the big names.

Speaker 1:

We've got like Toca Madera, we've got maple and Ash, we've got the four seasons. We've got, um, Boulder's Savannah sanctuary, Royal palms, Montelucia, um, awesome crew Canty, you know, uh, Ladera, taco, Gilda, all these, all these places that have been like, you know what, you guys are the little guys, you guys are the underdog and you guys have a great story. Why not support it? And that's, that's kind of why the reason we decided to launch here, um, and kind of sitting back on the question is, is if we had to do it all over again, we would, um, at some point we said we first we wouldn't just because it's been such an uphill battle. Yeah. Um, the number one consumer city of Moscow for the world is New York. So if we would have launched in New York, I bet you we would've sold out. But we've been doing it here.

Speaker 1:

Um, and it's been great because we've been able to teach people about it. I've been able to go to places and, and explain this and people are always like, Oh, so, so you're the owner? And I'm like, yeah. And I'm like, and they're like, well, never met the owner. Patrona I'm like, me neither. And I'm like, and that's just like a really, really cool thing. You get to connect with people on just like such a cool and, and, and bottoms just level of being, Hey, this is, this is what we have, this is what we're producing. And we just want to show you what the differences and they're like, I get it. And it's, it's great converting people to that because it's touching back on those varietals. Each varietals is going to have its own different unique characteristics, like the difference between a white grip and a red grape.

Speaker 1:

Right? Right. Um, we have like, tabula Toba is going to be very floral. It's going to have some notes. It's going to have some chubby notes. Double C J is going to be completely different. It's going to have like a Cedar Oak smell to it. Um, it's going to have Cedar taste, it's going to have a root flavor like a beat, and then it's going to finish off with like a sweet papaya. That [inaudible] is completely across the board from that. That is not the girls at a higher elevation. So it's gonna have, it's gonna be very robust and full bodied. Uh, like a high altitude Cabernet. It's going to have a lot of character. It'll have like a slaty fuel on the mouth. It'll have like a mushroom on the nose and then I'll have like a jalapeno kick to it. But these are, this is nothing we're adding, we're not adding the floral or the nuts.

Speaker 1:

We're not adding the papaya, we're not adding the jalapeno. Those are notes that come from the actual like obvious which are the really cool things and when you start falling down that rabbit hole of all of these things, you start kind of like appreciating the spirit and like what you're sipping and what you're drinking on. Yeah. That, that again goes back to that authenticity there. It's, it makes it almost more meaningful and especially if you can tie it to that idea that this is a celebratory drink. This is not something that you go out after you go to the waste management open and just rip shots of, you know, this is something that you use it as a, as a cause to celebrate or you know, however you want to do it I suppose. But it's, it's just fascinating to hear, you know, a product that has had so much love and family and tradition kind of bred into the process.

Speaker 1:

It's pretty neat. And I mean to speak to that you've brought some other things that I think will will tie back to the culture of Oh, haka. Yeah. Well, um, another cool fact that about ms Gallas is, is zero headache, zero hangover, cause it's all organic and it's all natural. So, you know, if you're just drinking ms gallon, you overindulge. You don't have to worry about it too much. The next day, the Chicago Institute, um, said that, uh, it's the cleanest form of spirit because I, it doesn't, it bypasses the liver. It starts absorption at the mouth before it goes through the liver, which is what gives you those headaches as well too. But yeah, we brought some different, uh, pieces, well, HUC is known for five different things. It's known for chocolate coffee, it's art, it's gastronomy and it's mezcal. And one of the pieces that I brought is this amazing.

Speaker 1:

I Liberty him. And in a Liberty case, a wooden figuring that gets made out of copilot wood. Um, they get worked down, uh, down in Wahaca and um, they get painted hand painted, uh, by different artists. Uh, this one was made by an amazing artist and his name is [inaudible] just happens to be our little brother, my little brother. So, um, something like this for him takes him about a month to do. So it's one of those things where it's time consuming. You can see the detail and all the lines and things of that nature. And it's, um, those are the things that we want to do. We, we want to help out. We want to create a bridge. We want to teach people about that. Um, my business partner, Abel says he wants to bring 1.6, two, 6 million people down to Wahaca to experience it. That's how you fall in love with it.

Speaker 1:

And you're gonna, you're gonna fall in love with the food, the way the, the, the friendliness of the people. You don't have to worry about, you know, like anything that you see on the news Wahaca is very, very safe. Um, and you'll just be welcomed in with open arms and, and those are kind of the things, that's why we have these things that we have on the table cause we, we want to teach people about it because education leads to the appreciation of the spirit. Right? Right. If you said, you know, it's waste management open and we're just going to do a bunch of shots, well let's, let's rip through some shots of vodka. You know, it's potato, it's every year. So that can be me. No problem. For example, our batches, we only make 1500 bottles. That's it. So it's not, it's not anything like that. So we teach people to appreciate it. They come back, they appreciate it and they start doing things like that and that, that helps out when they buy a bottle of mezcal. Karanja when they buy a shot, when they buy a cocktail off of it, they're not helping the CEO of Patrone bias, 10th vacation home in Bali. They're literally helping me put my little brother through school so that I can try and get them to do some, some things like this.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. And that piece is amazing. I mean, I know you held it up to the camera, but unless you're sitting here and looking at it in person, it's really difficult to see the amount of detail that has gone into it. I mean, it's a, I was looking at it up close. It's, it's amazing that he was able to do that. I mean, the detail it shouldn't, it's probably gonna be a surgeon or something like that. I mean, it's amazing. Um, and then what about this piece?

Speaker 1:

Uh, so the other piece that I brought was a tangle Mescalito. Um, the jungle Moscato, um, is basically like a decanter. Um, and it's kind of a, another symbolism. Um, it's th they used to hold Mischelle. They're very rare now actually. Um, so they don't make them that often. And uh, it's so as a decanter from a scowl, and it was to symbolize when you drink, don't drink as much to the point that you start acting like a monkey. And you lose your senses. So it's a, it's a cool middle, neat thing to have now.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Yeah. That is neat. And so, you know, what are you doing now to, I would say, you know, continue to grow the brand, you know, so I know you're, you're, you're in a lot of these big places. The issue is they may carry the product, but if people aren't buying it because they don't know about it, they don't know what it is. Like I said, I've never heard of it. And if somebody offered it to me and said, uh, you know, try it. I'm like, no, I'm good. I'll stick to my normal thing cause I'm not super adventurous but so, you know, you're on podcasts and things or how are you guys promoting this?

Speaker 1:

Man? We, we are, we are trying to do as many things as possible. We've got so many different things. For example, like one of the things that we'd like to do is we like to do pairing dinners and we've had a dinner pairings at the Phoenician at the four seasons, um, with [inaudible], with, um, Tamara Stanger. We've, we've done different pairings like that. I've actually got one coming up, um, on February 10th at Sumo Maya. Um, so we'll be doing a chef center with a specialty menu. So we'll do things like that. We'll do a lot of, um, educational tastings, uh, complimentary educational testing tastings at different bars across the, uh, the state. Um, and then w we'll, um, we'll, we'll do a sip and paint night where we have the walk and the case and you can come and paint and you can teach about it. Um, it's, uh, we're always out at all the bars.

Speaker 1:

We're trying to do a lot of staff education. We're trying to just teach people about it so that they know, because you're right, a lot of people are like Jack and Coke, Jack and Coke, Jack and Coke or vodka cranberry. Let me, let me get that. Because they don't know what it is out there. And then like I said, they wake up the next day with a hangover and it's just, they feel bad and they're like, Hey, you know, why am I going to do that? If can go to the bar? Have a neat miss gal. Don't have to worry about, you know, adding all the sugars for the margarita and I'll have a [inaudible] it tastes like a margarita cause it's got that jalapeno kick to it. It's good for my body and I can wake up the next day energized and everything. It's, it's a no brainer. Right.

Speaker 1:

That's, those are the things we do. We've partnered up with like earn your booze where one of their sponsors. Um, we do a lot of, uh, we've partnered up with bat conservation America. We have some shirts that we have that were made by, um, Quinn. Uh, he owns cumulative from down in Tucson. Um, and we did a, we went to the desert botanical garden and we photograph some of the Agadas there. We're on a series to a volume two of the, of the shirts that you can get on his website. Um, and for each shirt, uh, that was sold. We're actually replanting one a Gabi. Um, we did one at the, uh, garden downtown. Um, and, uh, we partnered up with a keep [inaudible] and keep Tucson beautiful and we've planted a GABA as well for that. So to help out with, um, the bats that are the pollinators, to have food, um, to teach people about it and to just educate the consumer because of just everything that's out there, they might not like my Muscat.

Speaker 1:

They might like somebody else's. Ms Scallon. That's great. I just want to teach people about ms scale and the scale is 1% of the global sales for alcohol. And that's ms gal and tequila combined. And so when I tell you that I make 1500 liter batches, tequila can do 18,000 in 24 hours. My batches are super, super small. So if you account for the 1% of the tequila, I am 0.01%. Yes. So, you know, those are the things and competing against some of these big brands where, where they have a lot of these marketing dollars. We, we don't, you know, we're, we, we've laid everything down on the line. I put a second mortgage on my mom's house. I still have the regular day job, we're out trying to talk to people and get them to carry us, educate them on it and all that stuff. And, and that's, um, w we're trying to do our part by doing all of these things to, to get people to understand the differences and then kind of show a little bit of love and support, which just like this, this thing, this helps being on your podcast. This helps out a lot.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Well I love it. I mean, anytime that I can see somebody doing, you know, things with passion but also for the right reasons, I'm happy to help. And I know a large part of what you do, you know, you've got a recycling program, you've got, you know, clothing. Can you tell some about some of the charitable stuff that you do?

Speaker 1:

So, um, well, like w one of the other things we, we partnered up with, um, our friend Juliette, we make a little [inaudible] that we have, um, to showcase the, uh, amazing talent that there is down in Tucson. So you can make a little cold. Pete does, which are the traditional celebratory drink of how you drink Moscow. Okay. So that's, that's like, uh, that's the cup or the vessel. Correct. That's the vessel. So that's one. Um, another one that we do is, is we're recycling our bottles. So I am asking the, the bars to keep the bottles and so we're turning them into candles. One of the other, uh, drives that we do is, is when we go down to Wahaca, we do a clothing drive, um, because Wahaca is the fourth poorest state in all of Mexico. Um, we ask our friends gently use clothing.

Speaker 1:

We, we pay for the shipping, we take it down, I grab everybody in town. I say, Hey, come over and try this. Whatever fits, just take it and you see the thank you on their faces, you know, like thanks. You know, nice pair of shoes that you don't never wear or things like that. That's, that's kind of what I was, I was listening to you on your podcast with my friend Mary's around and, and you have some stuff that you don't have and stuff. And I was like, man, this would be great. I can talk to him about those things. Like those are the things that we want to do. We want to bring people down to the Hacienda to experience the mezcal experience of the mezcal experience. It's really cool when you, when you go down to the hustling that we, you seemingly looking like that shirt.

Speaker 1:

I never wore that shirt and this guy's wearing the shirt. It's just amazing. It's one of those things where where you give back, it's not just take, take, take, you just, you give back, you know, just put out into the universe what you want, you know, to receive. Yeah. I love that. And you know, we had talked about it a little bit, but um, you know, when you're working in this industry and you're out there and you have to be showcasing your product all the time and you know, there's kind of an incentive for you to drink a lot, to drink all the time. But you told me you kind of had to put a little pause on that every now and then. Yeah. Yeah. So right now I'm doing my, uh, my, my sober month, um, every, every year we do a couple of sober months.

Speaker 1:

Um, because it's, it's, it's an industry. It's tough. You can very easily, it says it's accessible. You know, I, I own the company, right? So I just drink. It's one of those things. And so, um, we're always on top of that. And, you know, I, I wake up earlier, I, I'm more, uh, focused like my mind, my mind is better. And like I said, I've got, I've got everything riding on it. I've got the second mortgage in my mom's house. I can't, I can't be messing up this for us, as in anything. It's like, it's not like, Oh, you know, I can just go back to something I was on. This for us is the legacy that we're going to leave. So we, we have to take care of it and proud of it. And so, um, me and my business partner able, um, we do months where we don't drink.

Speaker 1:

Um, and just to kind of reset the body, get the mind right, get, get a bunch of, uh, of, um, uh, things done for the company. Yeah. That's amazing man. What a great story. Um, what else is there that, that I'm not covering? Cause you've got a lot of stuff and you're, you do what you're so passionate about it. I want to make sure we don't miss anything. Yeah, no. So a lot of, uh, a lot of ways people have gotten to experience Mischelle cause sometimes it's a little strong, right? It's kind of like a PD scotch. It's got a little bit of smoke. It's got a little bit, like I was saying, that was that there's very robust, um, a lot of them are doing cocktails and that's the introductory or gateway to them. Um, so once they start doing that, but, uh, that's, that's one of the ways we experienced Mischelle.

Speaker 1:

Um, the dinners, uh, the recycling, the, um, conservation that we do. Um, we're trying to set up an [inaudible] garden as well at the desert botanical garden. We've just cool, so many cool different things. Um, I tell people to just kind of follow us on our Instagram. It's, uh, our Instagram and our Facebook. Um, and we post everything on there as well too. Yeah. So to connect with you, your, your main website is a mezcal Catania U s.com. Correct. And your Instagram, do you want to throw out what the handles are? [inaudible] on your us as well too. Okay. So it pops up underneath that, um, uh, mezcal dot [inaudible] dot us. But it, it'll pop up. It'll pop up. And then you had, you had a review I think, right? That was on, uh, right on Ruby. Yeah. Uh, Christina matter at that, um, she did that for us.

Speaker 1:

Um, she did a, an article, I, I'm sure you'll probably list the link as well on there as well. Um, yeah, so she did an article on us. It's an amazing article. It talks a little bit about, more about that. Um, kind of like everything we've talked about here. Um, we're actually coming up, we're 20, 22 days from our first year of being in business and selling the Scouts. So we're, we're super excited about that right now. The coolest thing about it is, is we launched in our state, right? I, I grew up here, I went to Trevor Brown high school, I went to ASU. This is our state. We were proud of our state and that's why we launched here. Um, you can only get it in Arizona and they terrorism on exclusive. So amazing. It's another thing of like how you can want up your friends and be like, Hey, you like Ms. Galloway.

Speaker 1:

He's just had the Arizona exclusive discount, you know? Yeah. Number three and Oh, haka baby. Yeah. And we were voted at best Mischelle by Phoenix new times as well too. So we were awesome here. Yeah, that's great. Now is this something that because of its exclusivity, can people go pick this up anywhere? I mean, can they go to like a Fry's and get it not at fries? Um, we D we are carried by a couple of independent liquor stores and we do have two total wines. There is a total wine on Tempe marketplace and then desert Ridge marketplace. And then on our website, if it's got to find this feature, you type in your zip code, it'll tell you the closest, either store that you can take us home to carry. Or you can do with the, um, you know, local bar. Yeah. Go to a bar.

Speaker 1:

You're in many places. I think you said a hundred and something. Yeah. So we are in 194. Yup. And that's just through hustle. You're just building relationships and connecting with these people. Uh, yeah. Yeah. So we, we, we go to the, all the bartending competitions, we go to the bars, we talked to the, um, um, we just follow them on Instagram. We show love and support. And uh, like I said, we've been blessed. They've been, they've been showing us love and support and things like that. Yeah. Well you got a great product. You've got a great story. I mean, you're very clearly passionate about it. It's something that your family is, uh, you know, has a lot of time in. And I think they've left it in very good, capable hands. I mean, it sounds like you're, you're, you're killing it out there. So I would encourage people to try it, right.

Speaker 1:

Try to connect with you and, and see how it is. Yeah. Try it. Come to one of the events, come to one of the dinners. Um, we have all of the events, like I said, on Facebook and uh, we always share muskox it's what it's meant to be. It's meant to be shared as well too. So if you've never experienced it and you see me on a bow, I will talk to you all, all you want. Great. Awesome. Well man, I learned a lot. I mean, this was a fascinating conversation. We had a first experience for me. I ate a grasshopper and a, I can't thank you enough for coming on the show. All right, well we thank you very much and uh, hope everybody has an awesome day. Yeah, thanks Ivan. Cheers.

Speaker 4:

The ruler nation podcast is brought to you by the RNR law group, Arizona's premier criminal defense and personal injury law firm available at www dot our our law, a z.com or give us a call, four eight zero four zero zero one three.