Gruler Nation Podcast

Episode #85: Social Media Tips& Tricks with Elizabeth Burk

January 29, 2020 Robert F. Gruler Jr., Esq.
Gruler Nation Podcast
Episode #85: Social Media Tips& Tricks with Elizabeth Burk
Chapters
Gruler Nation Podcast
Episode #85: Social Media Tips& Tricks with Elizabeth Burk
Jan 29, 2020
Robert F. Gruler Jr., Esq.

Elizabeth Burk owns Social Proof, a Phoenix based social media marketing firm that focuses on accountable, ROI-driven, social media strategies for businesses. Her firm works with dozens of clients nationally, providing full-service social media management programs. 

 

Elizabeth also provides advanced corporate training in social media, helping elevate the skills of in-house social media professionals. Elizabeth loves connecting with people and since that is what social media is all about she loves her job! She is also passionate about business owners and entrepreneurs because they continue to amaze and inspire her. 

 

To learn more about Elizabeth and Social Proof check out their website at yoursocialproof.com or connect with her on Facebook and Instagram @yoursocialproof and give them a follow on Twitter @socialproofaz  

 

Please Like, Subscribe, and Comment below! 

 

#socialmedia #tipsandtricks #ROI #socialmediastrategies #socialmediamanagement #training #entrepreneur #businessowners #entrepreneurlife #SocialProof #socialproof #YourSocialProof #socialproofaz #podcast #InspirationwithGrulerNation #inspire #gruler #inspiration #GrulerNation #GrulerNationPodcast #gnp #arizonapodcast #scottsdale #yesphx #phx  

 

The Gruler Nation Podcast is a show that focuses on conversations with interesting "Level 10" people passionate about changing the world with their work, relationships and ideas. The show is hosted by Robert Gruler, an attorney and founding partner of the R&R Law Group, a criminal defense law firm based in Scottsdale, Arizona focused on helping good people charged with crimes move forward with their lives.   

 

Interested in being on the show or have a guest recommendation? Email Robert directly at robert@rrlawaz.com or visit www.robgruler.com for more information.  

 

 

Support the show (https://www.ericshouse.org/donate/)

Show Notes Transcript

Elizabeth Burk owns Social Proof, a Phoenix based social media marketing firm that focuses on accountable, ROI-driven, social media strategies for businesses. Her firm works with dozens of clients nationally, providing full-service social media management programs. 

 

Elizabeth also provides advanced corporate training in social media, helping elevate the skills of in-house social media professionals. Elizabeth loves connecting with people and since that is what social media is all about she loves her job! She is also passionate about business owners and entrepreneurs because they continue to amaze and inspire her. 

 

To learn more about Elizabeth and Social Proof check out their website at yoursocialproof.com or connect with her on Facebook and Instagram @yoursocialproof and give them a follow on Twitter @socialproofaz  

 

Please Like, Subscribe, and Comment below! 

 

#socialmedia #tipsandtricks #ROI #socialmediastrategies #socialmediamanagement #training #entrepreneur #businessowners #entrepreneurlife #SocialProof #socialproof #YourSocialProof #socialproofaz #podcast #InspirationwithGrulerNation #inspire #gruler #inspiration #GrulerNation #GrulerNationPodcast #gnp #arizonapodcast #scottsdale #yesphx #phx  

 

The Gruler Nation Podcast is a show that focuses on conversations with interesting "Level 10" people passionate about changing the world with their work, relationships and ideas. The show is hosted by Robert Gruler, an attorney and founding partner of the R&R Law Group, a criminal defense law firm based in Scottsdale, Arizona focused on helping good people charged with crimes move forward with their lives.   

 

Interested in being on the show or have a guest recommendation? Email Robert directly at robert@rrlawaz.com or visit www.robgruler.com for more information.  

 

 

Support the show (https://www.ericshouse.org/donate/)

Speaker 1:

This is episode 85 of the griller nation podcast. My name is Robert ruler, joined today by Elizabeth Burke, who is a local entrepreneur. She owns social proof, which is a Phoenix based social media marketing firm that provides a whole slew of services. We're going to dive into that, what she does and understand how she helps businesses with their social media. So thank you Elizabeth for being here.

Speaker 2:

Thank you for having me.

Speaker 1:

It's social media is so it's such a broad word, such a huge category of everything now. So you know, for , for me and of course for you, you know, we kind of have an idea of what it means when somebody says, I have social media. You know, I'm a social, I have a social media marketing firm. But for those who may not understand what that means , uh , I think a lot of people just, you know, they know Facebook is , they get on and they scroll. That's it. But what is it that you actually do? So what are you delivering in terms of value to the people that you work for?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so social media is a giant network. And like you said, a lot of people just use it personally for entertainment. Lots of time-wasting. Um, but if you think about it, it's everybody's on some sort of social media, right? And so it's a great place to reach, reach people and businesses. It's so affordable and easy to have a presence and reach people. So in the social media marketing worlds, it's, it is a little hard to understand what that encompasses, but it's basically any strategy that we can use the social media platforms to reach your target market.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah. Cause it's a lot, you know, and it's funny because I, I'm in a lot of networking groups. I know you are, and I'll speak with a lot of business owners that don't have any social media. And it's funny because it's 20, 20 now and they're just not, there's no presence anywhere because they haven't been doing it. They get it through referrals or through direct mail or the phone book. You know, there's a lot of people who still in the phone book and things. And so when somebody comes to you and they say, I have to do social media. And they don't have any presence. What kind of, walk me through the framework on that. I mean, how are you helping somebody who's a social media, you know, technophobe kind of kind of person transition into building out a presence. What's that conversation look like?

Speaker 2:

It's really about capturing what they're passionate about because all of the other marketing they're doing is just sharing their message expression , expressing their passion about what they do. So I do have a lot of people who are really worried about privacy or they're so hesitant to put on social media information about what they do. They're not, you know, they don't like social media, but we sit down and we talk about who they are, what they're passionate about. It really love it. It's my favorite part, just sitting down with someone, getting to know them and then translating that message to the audiences on social media. So we focus a lot on branding. You know, the very first thing we do is establish what the look and feel of their business is. And so once we've gotten that established, it's really unique. We spend a lot of effort trying to help our clients accounts stand out from all of the other accounts on social media with that specific look and feel branding. And a huge part of that again is their message. Um, and then from there, once we've got the look and feel down, we take it to the deeper strategies of content marketing , um , how we present our client to the audiences, who their audiences are. How do we get those audiences attached to their social media? Um, and we take care of most of it. So the clients who really don't like social media and never want to touch it, don't have to ever touch it, we'll take care of all of that for them as long as they're willing to share with us what they're excited about.

Speaker 1:

Right. And I can imagine how that can be overwhelming for somebody. I mean, you just use a lot of terms that are content marketing, target audience and all that stuff that a lot of people have never even thought about. Not to mention now you've got to go post it on Facebook and LinkedIn and Instagram and all, you know , there's a lot. So it can be, it can be very confusing and difficult for business owners to, to, to kind of wrap their hands around it. Yeah. So, yeah. So one of the things I wanted to ask you about , uh , before we kind of dive into the meat and potatoes here, why you mentioned the privacy, right? I really kind of don't remember what it was like to have privacy related to social media. You know, because I mean, I don't remember when Facebook was what was new or whatever, but I , I must've been in college and I just never had that. I , I a big w, you know, we're both younger in a bigger part of our lives have been on social media and the neck , the generation beneath us, their entire lives have been on social media. And so it's kind of strange to me when when people won't get on, won't get on it because of privacy and they don't see the value there. Have you, you work with a lot of people in this space. I mean, have you thought why ? What's the justification for that? Or the rationale? Is it just a , it's my data, it's my information.

Speaker 2:

I mean, I can understand where people are coming from, that they're concerned about privacy. If once it goes on the internet, it is all over the place. But I think the main thing, and most of my clients are businesses and so I just need to help them understand. And a lot of people don't get this at the beginning, that if you go on to social media as a business that does not jeopardize anything personal, you know , they don't have to know your kids' names, don't have to know what street you live on. All of you know, none of that stuff is affected. It's just your business. You can represent your business. And if you were to go to a networking meeting or even just in your community, would you want to keep your business private? No, absolutely not. You want, you've invested a lot in your business. You want everybody to know about it. And so there's , although I do deal with a lot of private individuals, there's no reason to keep businesses and how they can help people private on those plots .

Speaker 1:

Yeah. Yeah. I completely agree. It's funny, I bought, I bought , uh , my stepdad a , uh , Alexa, you know, when it was burning, when it was brand new and he wouldn't plug it in, you know, he just wouldn't plug it in . And he's like, nah, we're good on that. We don't need that around here. Meanwhile, he's walking around with a cell phone, which basically does everything that that's doing anybody , right . So anyways, I could, that's a , that's a side topic. Get off on a tangent on that. But, so how did you get into this space? You know, social media is one of those skillsets that is kind of, you know, I know schools are teaching it now and I know there's all these different courses and there's different workshops and, but it's, it's, it's kinda more than that. It's more than just knowing like best time to post and best time. You know, how , how to, how to do content marketing, how to create content, how to find your target audience. It's kind of an art form. You have to, you have to develop that and you need to , to be very skilled in order for it to be effective. And obviously you are because you help other people do it. You've elevated yourself and built up a , um, you know, a whole, a whole portfolio of different products that , and services that you provide. So how did you, how did you kind of evolve into this position?

Speaker 2:

You know, it's interesting. I went to school, I studied English , um, English and psychology. So out of college I took the first writing job I could get because I knew they were few and far between. And it happened to be with a marketing firm. It was a really small company, husband and wife. I was their only employee and I kept asking for raises because I wanted to be making more money. And so eventually they said, you know, we're, we don't do social media. We're a marketing company. We probably should, if you want to go Elizabeth and figure out some package to offer to our clients that has to do with social media will then you'll be worth more money to us. Yeah . So I dove into social media and realized, wow, there is a lot here that businesses are not doing and there's a lot here that other marketing companies are not capitalizing on. Um, so I put together some packages and started selling them and was being very successful. And then unfortunately the owner of that company was diagnosed with a brain tumor. So they sat me down and you know, we're going to cut back, spend a lot more family time. Um, we don't want to let you go. We really love you, but we don't really have a choice right now. So we have all these accounts that you've sold in service. If you want them, you can have them. We'll support you in starting your own business however we can. And so that's amazing. I never wanted to be an entrepreneur ever in my life, but I was such a gift from them. I thought, yes. I thought, how could I not run with this? Let's see what happens. And so , um, after leaving them and taking those clients, I really decided to specialize in social media marketing. And although I still love content writing , um, we've kind of just focused in on social media marketing and it's evolved as the industry has evolved of course. But we've been really successful. We've grown a ton and it's exciting.

Speaker 1:

That's super exciting . Yeah. I mean what a gift that's, you almost had like your own little incubator. You , you had the ability to go and , and you know, practice your skill set , develop all that without a lot of the risk of, you know , Hey, in the shingle out in the , and the on the side of the road.

Speaker 2:

And they were great coaches too. Just seeing how they ran their business. They were quite transparent with me and I learned so much from them. I'll always be grateful to them and he's better now. He's, he's healed and their businesses back on track and we still refer business back and forth to each other just because that makes me feel better. But you like being on your own. I do. [inaudible] life as an entrepreneur is different than what you expected. Yes. Life is not an entrepreneur. You can never stop thinking about the business. I'm sure you understand this. So it's way more than I ever anticipated it being. But it's so rewarding. I love, I've grown a team now and I love being able to lead them and provide them opportunities and know that I am providing for other people's families. I think that's why other business owners love this too, is it's, it's so cool. Not only the service and that I get to help other people's businesses grow, but that I feel like I'm contributing to the

Speaker 1:

totally. Yeah. Right. And it , and it allows you to exercise your creative muscle a little bit more. You have , you have a lot more freedom. That's what I love about it. You're not, you know , you have the ability to create things the way that you want them to be created. There's nobody else to tell you how to do that. And you're creative obviously cause you do the social media and because you're a writer and all that stuff, so it must just feel , uh, like you have a , you have a lot of freedom.

Speaker 2:

Yes. It's so much fun.

Speaker 1:

That's good. Yeah. I'm excited. I'm happy that , that it's going well for you. So let's dive into, so , uh, you know, I was poking around your website and I know you've got, you've got a lot of you, you do a lot. You , you do a lot, you know, a lot. And uh , so I , you know, it's 20, 20, let's say, first of all, if you're not on social media, you should probably be on social media.

Speaker 2:

Yes. That's a great first thing to recommend.

Speaker 1:

So what do people, how , how do people, obviously the idea would be to go and consult with you right, to, to ask some of these questions, but what should people be considering? Because there's a lot of options. There's, you know, there's YouTube, there's Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, all these different things. What, what are kind of the conversations people should be having or some of the things they should be thinking about as to, you know, what platforms are best for them or what's going to be the best use of their time for an ROI perspective.

Speaker 2:

That's a great thing to think about. My perspective is there are tools out there that can make it possible to post everywhere with one click. So you might as well be on all of the social media platforms. Even if your target markets aren't necessarily on that social platform or if you aren't going to implement any specific strategies for that platform. If, if we can make it easy to be everywhere, let's be everywhere because that will help our SEO. Um, we'll be discoverable. There's something called , um, local SEO, which really zones into your area, you know, web listings, things like that.

Speaker 1:

SEO is search engine optimization. So for people who don't know, that's for , that's how you rank higher in Google. When you do a search in Google or any search engine, you want to be at the top of the list because nobody goes to page two of Google. There's that saying the best place to hide a dead body. And on the page two of Google, which is true, nobody ever goes there. So you want to be there and a lot of what you're talking about is influential for that. Yes . So all of the social stuff can impact the factors that Google thinks are important to rank you higher.

Speaker 2:

Definitely. I'm glad you explained that. Thanks for doing that. Um, so when I tell clients, post everywhere, create a profile everywhere, set up something that you can be putting out content, but then choose one platform that you want to emphasize. Um, thinking about your target market is probably the best way to decide which platform to be on different. Um, demographics go to different social media sites. So Facebook is generally , um , older individuals. Most everybody's on Facebook, but that demographic is, you know, 40, 35 to 60 or above.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. The, the, the newer generations not really as excited about Facebook anymore.

Speaker 2:

Right. Instagram's great for millennials. Um, people, you know, ages 25 to 35, Twitter is really good if you, if you're an author, celebrity , um, or if you are going after very specific brands, other corporate clients, if you're a business to business company, Pinterest is great. If your target demographic are DIY wires, people who do it for themselves or love products, moms. Um, if you're going for younger demographics, most of my clients aren't because they have less money, but you know, there's not making purchases . Their Snapchat . Um, LinkedIn, LinkedIn's really good for if your target demographic is all the people who hate most social media platforms. Yeah. There's a lot of professionals out there who don't have time. They're not interested, but most of them are on LinkedIn. And so that's a great target Dem target for people who, who want to reach professionals.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. And, and like you said, there are, you know, there are many, many tools that you can use that to beat , to kind of be everywhere, but you want to pick one that, that you want to build your cause . I think that's what unfortunately happens a lot of the time of people, especially with people who try to do it themselves. They try to build everything, right? LinkedIn and Instagram, I want a million followers and I want this on all these different platforms versus taking one and just running with that. Yeah, so something that is kind of like a , you know , a cat and mouse game with all marketing, is that you? It's , it's always changing. Everything is constantly changing. What, what do you see happening in 2020 or where it were ? Where is is kind of the landscape going because I know there are changes.

Speaker 2:

Yes. I am super excited about what, what's happening in 2020 I think social media platforms are going to be much more focused on communities rather than icons. So groups are going to be very big. Facebook's algorithm currently is promoting groups and punishing business pages and so if you can create a community around, not necessarily your business but an aspect of your business or a pain point that people have, why they come to your business, creating that community. People contribute healthily to that. They see it on their feeds. There's even some, you know, mild advertising that Facebook will do for you just because they're promoting groups so much right now. Um , even on LinkedIn, LinkedIn groups took a big hit awhile back because they were getting very spammy. But that, that tendency toward community , uh , like interests starting conversations , um, feeling supported on those platforms. Another thing that social media has had to deal with in 2018, 2019 especially is this fake Facebook life. You know, there's been a lot of negative talk about social media in that it's, it's artificial. People feel depressed, they use social media a lot. And so to combat that, to kind of offset those negative conversations that people are having about social media, they're pushing towards authenticity, community support. So anything that relates to that I think is going to be big part of 20, 20 social media strategies.

Speaker 1:

That's interesting. Why do you think that is? Do you think it's because, because you know, they're there, it's kind of a PR move from the social media groups. Like they're trying to kind of, you know, we saw all, we saw all of it right over the last election with the fake news and all of this stuff, and Russia bought ads on Facebook and all this stuff. So now they're, you think they're just trying to create, you know, these communities in order to push back and respond against that? Or is it, I mean, I would have to imagine, I'm very cynical about it, but when you build these groups in these communities that there's a lot of engagement that's going on in those different communities and they can keep people on their platforms longer and serving more ads.

Speaker 2:

Exactly. You nailed it. So social media platforms or businesses, just like anybody else, they're interested in making money. Right ? And so if they can get people to be engaged using their platforms more frequently, spending more of their time on those platforms, then they can service more ads. Their net worth increases, you know , their business grows just like anybody else. You want to reach more people. So they're very strategic about looking at flack they've gotten in the past and how they're going to overcome it in the future. And I think groups is there. They've always had groups, but I think groups is going to be a new focus of helping people have positive experiences with social media. So they come back more frequently, stay longer, see more ads, and can kinda change the reputation for the social media platform .

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I think it's probably a good move. I think people are getting kind of, they're becoming self aware about, about how the algorithm works and this idea that they're going to show you stuff that's gonna good or rile you up a little bit because that will cause you to engage with that content. Then you're going to leave a comment and, and you're going to , you're going to blast somebody who you never know, you don't know who it is across the country and they're going to respond to you and you're gonna respond to them. And then you've got this online debate in your little thread going on. And then those comment threads, you know , turn it 28,000 comments and everybody's just on Facebook arguing with an internet stranger.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. In fact, I get a lot of concerned , um, clients and things like that, that they don't want to be involved with any negative conversations. But what they don't know, obviously we want to avoid negative conversations about their business, both positive and negative. Facebook doesn't care as long as it's a conversation that people aren't engaging with. If it's a solid, neutral, something that doesn't inspire anything to write anything, any, you know, reaction then,

Speaker 1:

right? Yeah. The cat picture is nice, but you just scroll right past it. You let you go, huh. Funny. Like, and you move on to the next one. But if somebody, you know, does something against the kid or you know, does something wrong or people get fired up about it and then of course they, they have to, you have to have a comment and, and you know this, you cannot end an internet argument unless you're right. You have to keep going until you disprove. You have to disprove the other person. Otherwise you've, you've brought shame upon your family. So, yeah. So it's so true. That's so funny. It's pretty important. Pretty important. If anybody takes any way , anything from this conversation, it's don't ever get off the internet unless you, unless you've proven you're right, because it matters a lot. It really matters. Yeah, it's a huge, it's a huge issue. Um, well, you know, while we were talking about that, so engagement, right is kind of the word does your, you want people to be engaging with, with your content. Yeah. And I think there was a time when you could just post something like that was social media. All you needed to do was just post a picture and just keep it , you know, do a picture every day, every day. And you're good. You're on social media, you've got a presence, you're showing up in somebody's news feed, newsfeed consistently, and that's all you needed. But now a lot more people are on social media. And so the, you know, the, the, the, the algorithms are a lot more selective about what they're showing you. They're showing you posts that people are engaging with. So how were you, first of all, is that, is that an accurate yes, absolutely. Okay. Is how are you kind of having that conversation? Because now it's, you ha you really do have to think about how to create those conversations and that's what you're doing. [inaudible]

Speaker 2:

so the strategy differs here a little bit for smaller businesses and larger corporations. My perspective on engagement is actually quite different from most people in my field, if not everyone. Um, but I just as a personal user, you know, you get on, you're scrolling and knowing the algorithm, you may, you may or not see somebody's post and if you do, you may just scroll past it. However, if someone comments on your post, are you going to see that? Absolutely. 100% of the time going to read it. So as a business you can take advantage of that. It's just like personal relationships too . I'm not, you know, if I sit down with someone for the first time and I just tell them, tell them, tell them about me, more about me, more about me. They're not going to remember me 10 days from now. But if I ask them about them, right , then they're going to remember I am, they're going to feel important, right? So we can do that same thing on social media. And I recommend to everyone that for they should be spending 50% of their social media time on other people's pages commenting on other people's pictures, other people's posts. So if I am a catering company and I want someone's business, I should be commenting on their posts. Every time they post making a comment saying, Hey, I love this. And pretty soon that company's going to say, who is this catering company? And why are they posts ? Are they commenting on everything we post? Yeah . But then the next time they need to do a party and have a cater, who are they gonna think of? They're gonna think of you, right? And so, especially for small businesses who don't have these giant budgets for big campaigns, the best way to get engagement and to be engaging is to be proactive, to decide whose business do I want? Who do I want? Who are my power partners? Who are going to , who's going to refer me a lot of business and then start relationships with those people online. And then eventually hopefully that that relationship will go offline and you'll start sharing business referring to each other. And so it really maximizes the time you're spending online with very specific key people.

Speaker 1:

Right. Yeah. And I love that. I think that's, that's fantastic advice. And Facebook actually rewards that they give you. I get, cause I do some of that, not nearly as much as I should cause I'm pretty stingy with my likes, which is internet rule number two apparently. But you know, which is so stupid. But you know, people are like that people , um, people I think have, have some sometimes like an issue about commenting or liking things because it indicates that they agree with something or they don't want to come off as being , um, sort of like a sycophant, you know, they just want, they just want to go about their business and , and not, and not engage with things. So for that business owner, how are you , you know , how do you, how do you encourage somebody to do that without coming off like their astroturfing? Like it's like, it's just a big fake empty , uh, gesture

Speaker 2:

that's so important. And this sounds silly but it can't be fake. So when I sit down with them, I like to ask them, what's your personality? Who do you like to talk to? What's who in the business world? What do you enjoy learning about other people? And because there's so many people on social media, you don't have to talk to somebody who drives you crazy, you know, you just go to the next lead or referral partner that you feel like you would really fit with. And if you jive with their posts and you like what they're doing, then great. You have something to talk about.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. Yeah. And I to to really, I mean kind of bigger points that I was thinking when you were speaking is one, do it with some purpose. Okay. So on social media, it's not everything to everybody. I mean, you can post your stuff for everybody, but if you can, if you can really have a focus and find your partners and find people who inspire you when you want to connect with and support, basically you're supporting them. So how can you give something before you started asking for something, which is, you know, giver's gain is, you know, kind of a , a little pithy way of saying that. And the other thing is that it's about relationships. The whole thing is about building relationships. It's not just, you know, you're on there liking things or commenting on things. It's like, Hey, this is just a tool. Just like we're on a podcast, having a conversation. You can have a conversation with people on the internet and just, and think about it that way. And I think that might make it easier.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Because you can have 10 million followers, but if you don't, if you're not connected with those people, if they're not buying from you, if there's not a synergetic relationship there, what's the point? Right. Um, it, you're absolutely right. It's all about relationships. And I think people assume that when you go online that's not as important. That authenticity isn't as important, that deeper connection isn't as important. But it absolutely is.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I think it's very important. What do you think about, you know, this idea of people wanting to be influencers and things? I, it's, it's, so I , I read an article somewhere, you know, that, you know, 25 years ago the top most desired professions were a doctor, lawyer, astronaut. Now it's influencer, YouTuber and you know, whatever it take talker or something like that. I mean it's, it's just, it's very interesting because , um, it , it's what the youth kind of sees and, and, and there is a lot of power in that. So, so for those people, I mean, ha ha. I guess, how do you balance kind of a healthy development of a life and a career versus some of those other things?

Speaker 2:

That's a great question. I think influencers, there are so many people who try to become influencers. And there's this funny thing about our society that if you're on a screen, you must be important. And so I think a lot of people pursue , um, becoming an influencer because they, they think it will give them influence or authority. And there's just something cool about being on a screen and having lots of followers. But the influencers who are successful have a very, very specific message, a very, very specific audience. And it's definitely a business. I think that's another reason people like the idea of becoming an influencer because they think it's easy. Yeah. It's not, I've worked with several influencers and it is a full time job with overtime more than a full time job. So I, for those that want to become influencers, I would advise them to really look at their motivations. Are they doing it because it's going to be easy and they're gonna make a lot of money doing this cause it's, it's not going to be easy and you're not going to make a lot of money doing this. And then your message, are you, you know, is it, is this the message of your life and it appeals to a very specific audience. And are you getting feedback on that? Um, for a lot of, I think there's a lot of other reasons people become influencers and I'm, I haven't seen a lot of those people have great success.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. I , it's, it's not easy. I mean we, you know, our YouTube channel, we, we are, you know, cranking out videos. Now we're in a kind of a weird niche where do criminal law, we're not going to have a lot of, you know, influencer status as a, as a criminal, you know, law firm. But it's funny when you were talking about, and it , my point before I finished that thought was it's , it's hard. I mean, it's hard. We've been, we've been putting out a ton of content and we had like 2000 subscribers, you know, and it , the content is good and it does well for our, for our company. But because it's because we set out to do that. Yeah . We, we used it as a tool to fulfill a purpose. We want to help a very limited niche, a very small subset of the population with their criminal case. And then they watched the videos and then that inspires action. They call our office, they hire the firm. So there's, that's part of the business plan. There's a strategy, there's a strategy. Exactly. But, but other people just don't do that. And when you were speaking, it's funny that you were saying that a lot of these influencers, it's a full time job. It's a ton of work. There's almost a paradox there because from a lot of the influencers profiles, it looks like they're always on beaches and private planes and they're , they're always, you know, sipping cocktails on a beach in Maui somewhere and you're , and that's the, that's the persona. So it's like, no wonder people want to be influencers because that looks like a pretty damn good lifestyle. Absolutely. Yeah. And then, you know, of course, as you know, that's, that's not reality. Not reality. What about, what about, you know, kind of, do you ever get any push back for what you do? Because some people I think view social media, and I hear this a lot, you know, social media is such a huge problem in the world, is what everybody says. Or maybe not in your world, but I hear that a lot. You know, why? Why is suicide rates so high? Why are people so depressed? Why do people more alone and disconnected than they ever have before? Even though we all have phones and we're all connected to everybody all the time. So you know what's going on with that. Uh , do you, I mean, do you ever, this is obviously, you know , you didn't create the social media. This is not your problem that you created, but I'm just wondering when you're having these, yeah, it's your world. When you're having conversations with people, does that ever come up or how do you respond to that kind of pushback?

Speaker 2:

Yes, and I agree that, I think there are a lot of people in the current society who overuse social media and it can affect your happiness and your stability and the other good things that you're investing on in , in your life if you're spending too much time on social media. Absolutely. I do think that it is now a part of our culture. I think, you know, the human race has always had problems and a long time ago it was measles and we solved that problem and now maybe it's technology, social media usage. Um, it's just part of being human being. There will be things that are difficult that we have to learn to deal with, learn to balance. I think there's some good awareness happening in our culture, in our community to help people recognize, you know, the cocktails on the beach in Maui is not reality, meaning in life comes from things other than social media. There's pros and cons to social media, but it just is now a part of like you were talking about the younger generation. I work with some youth at church and they're always on their phones. Right ? Um , and that's just, I didn't even have a phone at their age. Um , but that's just part of the culture. And so learning self-control, learning balancing techniques, just looking at your life and making sure that you're working on things that are fulfilling for you there. There are a lot of things that we can do individually to make sure that it's not taking over our lives. And I obviously tried to know a lot about social media and be on social media to be aware of trends, but I absolutely have rules for myself about how much time I spend on social media and I'm cognizant of what I'm doing on social media and am I going to social media when I'm already maybe a little bit sad. Okay then no , I'm going to go for a walk or do something that will increase my positivity. So just being aware , um, recognizing social media, embracing the good that it can offer, but setting that clear line on an individual basis so that it doesn't become a problem.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and that's great self-awareness. I mean I think a lot of people don't have that level of self awareness, but we are seeing, I think a movement from a lot of the technology companies we're seeing like, you know, Google or on , you know, on , on Android and iPhones. I think they both now have sort of a, Hey, you've been on your phone for a lot today. Maybe we should turn that off. I of course don't use it because I like to be on my phone all day long, so why would I use that? But, but there are these little reminders, kind of like healthy electronics usage. And I think that'll be, I think that's a great trend. Yeah, yeah, yeah. It's, it's, it's curious. It is going to be curious to see how this stuff goes. You know, there's, especially with the younger generation, I don't have kids, but , uh , you know, I , I have thought kind of through that it's, and , and I see sort of amongst my friends who do have kids that kind of, there's kind of that split, you know, there's the, some people who are really strict, you know, phones go away at five and, and , and, and you're not allowed to have it. You can't think about it, can't touch it, can't do any of that stuff. And then there's the other side that says, well, this is, this is the tool. This is what they're going to be using. I mean this, there's more power in the phone then than in a textbook because you can get everything that's probably better, more up to date, more accessible, easier to digest. You can go on YouTube and learn anything but so why would you take that away from your kid, you know , versus giving them the textbook. So all of these huge ethical things that I think about, even though I have no reason to think about it cause I don't actually have any kids, but it's an interesting conversation and you know, and you're right in the space that's kind of developing all of this stuff. Yeah. All right. Well what about some practical things that people can or should be doing? You know, I know video is super important, you know, they're all, I think really promoting that all the different platforms are promoting it. And I wanted you to kind of talk on that, maybe some best practices, live video versus recorded video. Uh , cause we do a lot of video. So I just want to get your take on , on

Speaker 2:

videos are huge. And the number one best practice is to do it. Um , especially with the push toward authenticity. You're, you'll, you're gonna make mistakes on video. It's okay. Embrace it. A mediocre video is better than no video and you'll get better as long as you're consistent doing it. So put it on your calendar, just make it happen. You'll come up with something to talk about. And with live video versus prerecorded video, live video is favored astronomically more on algorithms than non-life video for the same purpose. Authenticity. So it's really easy to create a live video. I feel like there's this giant wall in front of people, especially those who have never done live video before. You see the little red live video button and you'd think you have something to say, but it's just, there's just this wall that you have to get over. It's nerve wracking . You want to feel prepared, you want look good. But the reality is you'll get traction just by doing it consistently. So yes, live video is definitely a best practice. Um, stories are also doing really well on both Facebook and Instagram right now. Um, and consistency.

Speaker 3:

You can [inaudible]

Speaker 2:

it's really hard to put forth the time to create five-star content every single time you put content on there, but just get stuff up. It's so much more important to have a presence than to have a perfect presence.

Speaker 1:

I love that. I love that saying presence is better than perfect presence. Yeah, that's great. I mean, so I have a coaching program I show up, so I have 400 videos on our YouTube channel and I will tell you this, I still am a refuse to do live video because of what you just said. Every time I S I'm like, ah, like, like I could feel my heart beat , you know? Right . Racing. It's so dumb. It's so dumb. And every time, the few times that I've done it, I get like one viewer, two viewers or something and I know everybody's seeing it, but nobody wants to hop on and hear me talk about criminal law. It's just not that interesting. But it, you know, but it is funny, I still, I still get that like sort of petrified feeling, but I tell other lawyers how important like, like our YouTube channel has literally every year brings us millions of dollars of business, be it because it's that effective and we don't pay for it. We don't spend any ad , we don't do any advertising. This is all organic. The only thing that it costs us is the time that it takes to produce the video and put it on there, which is very minimal because we do it all in house. I have a webcam and a light that's on right here and basically the same equipment that I use for this podcast. It's all inexpensive. And the ROI on it is insane. And I will tell other attorneys and other people you have to get on YouTube, like this is what it's doing for our firm. And they just go, no, we're okay. We're going to keep doing the pay per click stuff. We're going to keep doing the legal directory stuff. So I , and I'm , and I'm a walking case study in how effective this is. And they still refuse to do it. They've seen our business grow. They've seen how important it is. So how are you having a conversation with your clients to say, do some video and how it , and how are they responding to that?

Speaker 2:

Well, I mean, the good thing about hiring a social media company is they take care of all of that stuff for you. Even though it's a small

Speaker 3:

okay

Speaker 2:

issue, you know, like you said, the equipment, it's not that expensive. You don't need a lot of it. Most everybody has a bajillion ideas in their mind that they could come up with. But for us to show up with our ring light in our webcam and say, we're doing this now, it makes them do it.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I like that. Yeah. You have that. You have the , uh , I'm not leaving until this is done a tool in your toolbox with the , I don't know.

Speaker 2:

And basically I'm just the accountability partner, you know, I have some people who say, okay, well we'll do it on their own. We'll do it on our own. And then a month goes by and I still haven't gotten any videos or seeing anything uploaded. So then I call them and I say, I'm going to call you Tuesday morning at 10 you better have had done a live video before then I'm going to be watching for it. So just having somebody to force them over that wall.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's great. Because it is, it isn't . You need that. So you're , you're , I mean more than just, you know, an agency that , that helps do the technical stuff. You're kind of a coach.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, for sure. Well, and because that has a lot of things have to come from them and so we can provide the strategy people, it's like you said, it's so easy. Um, it's, it is time consuming, but it's not difficult. And so yeah, as long as someone can see, Oh, this is the strategy, Oh, this is why what I'm doing matters. Oh, I can have confidence that there will be ROI in this, then that helps a lot.

Speaker 1:

Right. And what about people who, who already are doing some social media, do you or are they, they're doing it in house or they have somebody there? How can you, can you help those people? Can you work with them also? How does that function?

Speaker 2:

There's certainly different levels of social media mastery. I'm, I don't push people to do more than they're going to do. I love clients who have someone in house who's already doing content because we can do a simple training with them. I have , um, a DIY social media training. It's about three hours long. So it's a good chunk of time. But in that three hours, I can give them the tools, the patterns, what to look for, how to create this branded look, just give them the keys that they need to be able to unlock their ROI even more than they're already doing. So a lot of people just have their receptionist or whoever has some extra time be posting things and with the , you know, I can hand them a checklist and say, just go through this checklist every week. And their social media activity, the quality of their social media activity will increase dramatically. Just from that one checklist. I love coaching. I love teaching, working with people who are already working on it, but maybe didn't study it. Just get some ideas.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's great because it can feel like we're with any marketing or kind of with anything in a business is that it's like drinking from a fire hose. And so if you can break it up into bite sized chunks, then it's a lot more manageable and it's a lot more effective. So I'm glad that you do that. Um , what about, what about life as an entrepreneur? So we spent a lot of time talking about social media. Obviously you're good at that, you know, you've thought through everything. What, you know, how is it building a team? How is it growing a business? How is it paying taxes on your own? You know, tell me about that life. How , how does it, it's terrible. I hate that part. That's the worst part. It is the worst. But how do you , you know, how , how is that going? Because this is kind of something that, you know, you didn't grow up going, I want to be an entrepreneur. You're not one of those kids who says, you know, I want to be, you know, a CEO of a company, but you are the CEO of your own company now. So how does that feel? How has that transition been?

Speaker 2:

I am super passionate about this and I think it's because I was that person who never ever wanted to be my own boss. Um, it's, there are so many tools available that make entrepreneurship so possible. And I have, so I have friends and other people that I know who just really disliked the nine to five drag or they wish they had more authority in their own life or things like this. And I just wish that I had known in college what an exciting adventure entrepreneurship could be. Yeah. So I started my business. I was 23 so I didn't know a lot. Um, but just seeing that it's, it's so possible, there's so many online tools that make it affordable, easy to track, things like that. And then just having confidence in your ability to communicate and help with other, other people with their problems. We , um, social proof has grown a ton through interns. Um, and perhaps it's because we're in a technical world , but it's really easy to work remotely. I love that my team members can work remotely. I work from home and I think a lot of businesses get stuck on this, Oh well I need an office, or how do I work with my employees? Rents a huge overhead. We can keep our overhead super low and have all of these great employees. They, they come on as interns, they go through a pretty intensive training process. And then from there they're ready to start working and providing great value. So we've got a team of 11 and they're all over the United States and they're really good at what they do. And because of certain online tools, I can track what they're working on, I can track how much time they're spending. They can have video calls with their clients and get their answer, their questions answered. And I just am realizing this is so possible. As long as you have the determination to go out and make it happen. And you can relate with people enough to make a sale. Entrepreneurship is possible for anybody.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. Yeah. It's true. And it's, it is exciting. It's a little scary at times. It's a little nerve wracking, but it , it allows you to be creative. It allows you to, you know, really kind of build, build what you want in the world and do the work that you want to do. And then, and then the, the neatest part of it is when you have good results, when you see somebody's business grow, when I see somebody's case get dismissed, and when I see somebody, you know, really thrilled with an outcome, and you do too . It's, it's, it's extremely rewarding because it's made possible by your efforts.

Speaker 2:

Yes. Yeah . It's very fulfilling and I wish more people did it. I love, I love working with other entrepreneurs , um , other people who've taken the leap to start their own businesses and learn things along the way. They just have such wisdom and understanding of the world. Uh, I love working with, with them as clients too.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. And it , it requires you to kind of be cutting edge in a lot of ways. And so I wanted to ask you how you stay on top of trends and developments. I mean, how did you, how do you know about, you know, the groups versus the pages and all of those things? Where do you, where do you get your information kind of what's your, what's your process look like to make sure that you're , you know, you , you're, you're the best so that you can deliver the best for your clients?

Speaker 2:

That's a great question. And I'm really specific about how I organize my time. And so I have a day dedicated Tor to education , um, where that's my day that I just research, read. The nature of my industry is, it's constantly changing. It's fast paced too . So I have new stuff to read every week. My team, I also incentivize my team to stay up to date on things. Um, the groups was actually a team member brought it to my attention. How she'd seen, she had noticed some different things, was reading, learning that their voice , some good opportunity there. So then I dove into it a little bit and together we kind of formulated some ideas of how our clients could take advantage of that. Um, so for me to answer the question directly, it's having time set apart that nobody can touch. That's research and education time.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's great advice. And yeah, we do that as lawyers too . You know, we're , where there's new developments we just block off. Like Ryan today is a whole day learning about new developments and drug DUIs . You know , that's all he's doing for all day to day and about half the day tomorrow. And I think that's critically important because you can get [inaudible] lawyers are a lot slower paced than what's going on with Facebook and the social media. I mean, we're studying stuff that takes, you know, 10 years to change yours sometimes on a daily basis. I mean, they're constantly tweaking algorithms. They're constantly, you know, I mean, who could have predicted before the 2016 election that all of these verifications would be required now? They needed to send me a letter to my house so that I could run an ad and all this stuff. And you're like, all right , you know, one small change can cause catastrophic effects for everybody and then you're going to have a bunch of angry clients calling you, Hey, what the heck happened? So you gotta be ready to go on those things.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. I do also have Google alerts for specific buzzwords or keywords. So I get notified when certain articles are published about the ownership of social platforms or algorithm changes, things like that. Um, there are also several websites that I follow pretty consistently that are just authorities in education, but I just wanna make sure I, a lot of industries have their required CES or , um, license licenses and I just want to make sure since I'm not required to get, you know , continuing education that I require myself to get it so that I can stay on top of the industry.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, it's good policy. We hit the guy who , uh, I brought on to help with our SEO. I think he, you know, I , I, I do the same thing. I get my own alerts and things. I'm constantly sending him these articles. Probably to the point he was like, Hey idiot, like this is my job full time. So stop sending me this stuff. But like I just wanted to be sure he knows this stuff's coming down the pike. So. All right. So how about practically? So what does it like working with you? So you know , um , do you, do you do , uh, you know, like one off consultations or you know, pro per project type of model? Or do you do because social media should be longterm, consistent, weekly, monthly, yearly. I mean, you've got plans in place for all of those different things. So is it something where people are working with you month to month? Can you just kind of describe what it's like to kind of engage with, with your company?

Speaker 2:

I'll do a free consultation with everyone. I am definitely in it for the benefit of this . So the business owner, and maybe that's because, you know, if I , I've experienced that myself, I want to make good decisions for my business. I want them to make good decisions for their business. So I love to sit down to a free consultation, let people know what their options are, specific to their industry, their goals , um , is what I can offer, going to help them accomplish their goals. If someone doesn't have any goals or they don't have any sort of sales funnel, which is just a plan to get people towards the purchase, then it's harder. But , um, we'll sit down, we'll talk about what their goals are, if, how social media can help them get there. And then from there, I don't do longterm contracts. I'm not gonna lock you in for a period of time, but it is monthly maintenance. Maintenance is just the foundation. And then on top of that, we can add , um , the selfless socializing is what I call it, that proactive outreach to start engagement on other people's pages and on your own page. And then there's all sorts of campaigns. I like organic campaigns more than I like paid campaigns, but both campaigns can help bring attention to your business. Um , we actually focused on reviews a lot because that's a big part of your presence online and on social media. So yes, it's a monthly maintenance package. And then from there we can add on, depending on the businesses needs, you know, is that group going to be the best option? Do we want to just run a series of contests throughout the year, whatever that looks like for their goals? Um,

Speaker 1:

yeah. That's great. So yeah, so you, you, you meet with them and then you'll craft something that that works for them. Exactly. Yeah. So it's not a one size fits all solution. You sit down, what are your goals, here's how we're going to do it. And uh, and then, you know, come to an arrangement accordingly. That's, that's, I think that's, that's awesome. All right . So what about, what are some of the best places for people to connect with you? So they've listened to it, they know you're obviously an expert in this stuff. How do they connect? How do they claim their free consultation? Or just call you and say, I love you. I'm in, I want to hire you. How does that, what are the best places to connect? [inaudible]

Speaker 2:

email is probably the best way to reach me. Um, it's elizabeth@yoursocialproof.com, but you can always look us up on social media. Obviously we're a social media company. We better have a presence online. Um, I'll pick up my phone anytime of the days . Well as long as I'm not in a meeting with somebody else. Um, but I'd love to connect with you.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. So it's your social proof.com is the main website, elizabeth@yoursocialproof.com you're on Facebook and Instagram at your social proof and then of course LinkedIn and Twitter. So you're everywhere as you should be. And uh , of course we encourage people to, to reach out to you and I really appreciate you coming on the show, Elizabeth. It was fun. I , uh , actually learned, learned a lot. So

Speaker 2:

good. I'm so grateful that you had me here. I really appreciate it.

Speaker 1:

I'm glad you're here. Well, looking forward to following you along and uh, and like to have you on the show again sometime in the future.

Speaker 2:

Thanks so much. It's been great.

Speaker 4:

The ruler nation podcast is brought to you by the R and R law group, Arizona's premier criminal defense and personal injury law firm available at www dot R R LA [inaudible] dot com or give us a call, (480) 400-1355.