Gruler Nation Podcast

Episode #84: Create a Healthy& Happy Lifestyle with Preslie Hirsch

January 24, 2020 Robert F. Gruler Jr., Esq.
Gruler Nation Podcast
Episode #84: Create a Healthy& Happy Lifestyle with Preslie Hirsch
Chapters
Gruler Nation Podcast
Episode #84: Create a Healthy& Happy Lifestyle with Preslie Hirsch
Jan 24, 2020
Robert F. Gruler Jr., Esq.

Preslie Hirsch was born and raised in Arizona. Through Preslie's diverse life experiences including managing chronic health conditions, being a competitive body builder and pursing a corporate career from a young age, at just 25-years-old, Preslie has made a name for herself in the entrepreneurship space as the owner of Hey Preslie Nutrition and Hey Preslie Creative. She even has her own podcast, the Hey Preslie Podcast!  

 

When she’s not smashing a CrossFit workout or hosting the popular Hey Preslie Podcast, you can find her cheering on her community and digging into personal growth. Preslie believes that systems and gratitude are the keys to achieving just about anything, including getting to share her story and favorite strategies with you here today. 

 

Preslie is an expert in healthy lifestyle habits and has coached hundreds of individuals to implement them in a sustainable way in their lives so make sure to check out her website to learn more at heypreslie.com and on Instagram @heypreslie or shoot her an email directly at info@heypreslie.com  

 

Please Like, Subscribe, and Comment below! 

 

#healthy #lifestyle #systems #entrepreneur #entrepreneurship #HeyPreslie #creative #nutrition #HeyPreslieNutrition #HeyPreslieCreative #mindfulness #crossfit #HeyPresliePodcast #podcast #InspirationwithGrulerNation #inspire #gruler #inspiration #GrulerNation #GrulerNationPodcast #gnp #arizonapodcast #scottsdale #yesphx #phx  

 

The Gruler Nation Podcast is a show that focuses on conversations with interesting "Level 10" people passionate about changing the world with their work, relationships and ideas. The show is hosted by Robert Gruler, an attorney and founding partner of the R&R Law Group, a criminal defense law firm based in Scottsdale, Arizona focused on helping good people charged with crimes move forward with their lives.   

 

Interested in being on the show or have a guest recommendation? Email Robert directly at robert@rrlawaz.com or visit www.robgruler.com for more information.  

Show Notes Transcript

Preslie Hirsch was born and raised in Arizona. Through Preslie's diverse life experiences including managing chronic health conditions, being a competitive body builder and pursing a corporate career from a young age, at just 25-years-old, Preslie has made a name for herself in the entrepreneurship space as the owner of Hey Preslie Nutrition and Hey Preslie Creative. She even has her own podcast, the Hey Preslie Podcast!  

 

When she’s not smashing a CrossFit workout or hosting the popular Hey Preslie Podcast, you can find her cheering on her community and digging into personal growth. Preslie believes that systems and gratitude are the keys to achieving just about anything, including getting to share her story and favorite strategies with you here today. 

 

Preslie is an expert in healthy lifestyle habits and has coached hundreds of individuals to implement them in a sustainable way in their lives so make sure to check out her website to learn more at heypreslie.com and on Instagram @heypreslie or shoot her an email directly at info@heypreslie.com  

 

Please Like, Subscribe, and Comment below! 

 

#healthy #lifestyle #systems #entrepreneur #entrepreneurship #HeyPreslie #creative #nutrition #HeyPreslieNutrition #HeyPreslieCreative #mindfulness #crossfit #HeyPresliePodcast #podcast #InspirationwithGrulerNation #inspire #gruler #inspiration #GrulerNation #GrulerNationPodcast #gnp #arizonapodcast #scottsdale #yesphx #phx  

 

The Gruler Nation Podcast is a show that focuses on conversations with interesting "Level 10" people passionate about changing the world with their work, relationships and ideas. The show is hosted by Robert Gruler, an attorney and founding partner of the R&R Law Group, a criminal defense law firm based in Scottsdale, Arizona focused on helping good people charged with crimes move forward with their lives.   

 

Interested in being on the show or have a guest recommendation? Email Robert directly at robert@rrlawaz.com or visit www.robgruler.com for more information.  

Support the show (https://www.ericshouse.org/donate/)

Speaker 1:

This is episode 84 of the Gruler nation podcast. My name is Robert Gruler joined today by Preslie Hirsch who is a local entrepreneur. She is the creator, the founder of a lot of stuff. I just kind of everywhere online it's, Hey Preslie nutrition. Hey Presley creative and she has the Hey Presley podcast. She's got a background in nutrition, she's coached hundreds of people and you also do CrossFit. Welcome to the show. Presley,

Speaker 2:

thanks so much for having me. I'm excited to be here.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I'm excited to talk to you. I think we have a lot in common actually. I know, you know, anytime I get an opportunity to speak with an entrepreneur and somebody who sort of manifests what they want to see out of their lives into the world, it's, it's thrilling for me because I like to see how people do things. And when I was poking around a lot of what you do, I thought it was fascinating that you used the words systems and you talked a lot about systems because that's kind of a, if you're, if you're in the space of, you know, of entrepreneurism and in creating, um, you know, businesses and things you have to operate on systems. But I think a lot of the population or a lot of people who kind of don't think the way that we do, they don't necessarily use that term. They use terms like goals or you know, just different ways of thinking about their lives. And so I wanted to ask you about that. Where, where did this kind of originate? Where did you get the idea of creating systems or can you describe what systems are? There's like five questions right there, but, uh, that's what I want to start with.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Which is like my favorite thing to talk about. So that's great. Um, systems have been a part of my life since I was very young. Like when I was, uh, in school and I wanted to go do something with my friends. I would have a system where I would create a PowerPoint and talk about where I was going to go and who I was going to be with and what we were going to do and show it to my mom so that she would like had all the details and could tell me I could go do something. And when I had a car washing business, when I was in middle school, I had a spreadsheet to track everybody that I washed their car for no reason. I don't know why you would need that in middle school. Right. But it was just like the way that I operated.

Speaker 2:

So I've definitely always done systems in my whole life. Um, but then as I got into college and was working full time and had an internship and was trying to keep up with school, I had to develop systems around time management. And then when you become an entrepreneur and you can do whatever you want all day long, but you have all these things you want to do and a lot of things you have to do, I realized that systems were a crucial part of accomplishing the things that I wanted to accomplish. So while there's a great place for goals and objectives and thinking about things in that way, I think the way that you get there is through creating systems in your life. So you're not always going, at least in my opinion, you're not always going to be motivated or driven or excited to do some of the things that you have to do. Uh, whether that's going to the gym or as an entrepreneur doing some of the more admin things that you have to do. But having a system around that is how you get those things done.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, and I love that because it's so true. And there's a, there's a book I wanted to ask if you've ever read it, but it's by a guy named Scott Adams. It's called how to, uh, how to fail at everything and how to fail at almost everything and still win big. Yeah, it's a great book. And he talks a lot about the differences between goals and systems. And so he, he's not a goal guy or he's, he's, he's goals are important, but they serve their purpose and certain things, but you know, he created a system. By building these systems, you can really kind of magnify your success. So rather than setting a goal of saying, I want to lose 50 pounds, you say, here's my system moving forward every single day I'm going to wake up and eat this and do that and do that. And, and he talks about building these in a number of different ways.

Speaker 3:

If you want to be a better speaker, rather than going and saying, I'm going to present in front of, you know, 5,000 people, you just say, every day I'm going to get a little bit better in these different aspects. And then it will compound. It's kind of like compounding interest and then you'll, you'll have a great, uh, you have a great, you'll reach your goal. Right. And so tell me a little bit about, so I know you do coaching, I know you, you, you extremely creative, you do nutrition. So I want to learn a little bit more about that. So how are you helping people build these systems? Or tell me about how you're kind of helping people implement them.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so it started as nutrition. So my degree from ASU was in nutrition and I opened nutrition coaching company right out of college and started doing it full time after eight months. So I've had it a little less than three or little more than three years now. And uh, in doing that, I realized that, you know, there's no shortage of information. Everything is on Google. It's not hard to figure out how to lose weight or how to reach your fitness goals. What, what we're missing is the system of how to get there, which is different for everybody depending on different factors in your life, your family, your environment, the way you were raised. Right? So people needed systems to implement the behaviors that they needed to do to reach their fitness goals. And then in doing that, I eventually hired coaches that now help me with Apresoline nutrition.

Speaker 2:

And because I loved creating the systems to run my business and I found out that a lot of other service based businesses needed that. So now I help other small businesses with their systems. So I'll come in and consult with them and then some of, some of the time I'll do the hands on actually helping them implement it. Um, and figuring out where are they spending time, energy, money, where are they getting stressed out that they don't have to be, that we could implement a system to save those things. You know, I say system stands for saving you stress, time, energy and money. Because not only do we want to do more things and not waste time, but you also have a limited amount of energy. So I think about it like if you're spending more time and energy on things that you don't need to be doing or they're exhausting or not moving you towards that goal, you know, it's time to reevaluate to get a better system in place.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. And when, when you, when you're coaching or working with other entrepreneurs or small businesses, do they, how does that process work? Do they, you know, talk to you about a particular problem that they have with their marketing or with hiring or how does that conversation go?

Speaker 2:

A lot of times it starts with a question of what are you doing that you hate doing or really don't like doing? Or what is it in your business or the thing that you're building that you're like, Oh, I have to do that. Or you dislike it so much that you're avoiding it all together and know that you should be doing it. Right. So a lot of small businesses are avoiding email marketing, which you be doing and don't want to be doing if you don't know how social media is another big one that people feel just like overwhelmed by. So they don't even try. Um, and then any kind of tracking. So a lot of small businesses aren't tracking how many clients they're bringing in, how many they're losing, like customer retention, all of those kind of scary numbers, numbers, things. If you're not a person that thrives on that information. So usually by asking like, what is it that you're not doing that you think you should be doing or that you don't like doing, opens up the door for where's an opportunity to create a system.

Speaker 3:

Do you think that these business owners, do you think that they know that they should be using these systems or is it more they don't even know that that's how it should be done?

Speaker 2:

Definitely the latter. Yeah, for sure. It's kinda like you just don't, I mean, with nutrition I say you don't know how bad you feel until you feel better. Like if you wake up groggy every morning and you feel like you're dragging all day, like to you that's normal until you have better energy and you're like, wow, I felt terrible before. Yeah. So it's the same thing. The systems. I think a lot of people believe that running a business has to be super hard or that certain things have to take a ton of time or be draining or you have to not do all these things you don't enjoy until they realize, you know, in, in conversations with, whether it's with me or other business owners, that there's ways to get around those things.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I think it's definitely a skillset. What, what I think about is people being, you know, really good practitioners. So obviously we have a law firm, right? So there are a lot of lawyers that I know who are excellent lawyers, but they're terrible business people. It's just terrible. But they can get great results and all this stuff. But if you look at their accounts and every, I mean it's just a mess and it does take, it does take some active effort to go and make those changes.

Speaker 2:

Totally. And I mean I am a creative too, and I do a lot of creative projects, but especially in the creative world. I mean there's a lot of excellent designers and people that do like hands on visual things that just don't have the experience or the knowledge or the interest in learning about running a business. And that's a large part of why I do what I do is it breaks my heart that there's people that have skills and talent and passion and like want to be doing something but lack the business sense or knowledge to monetize it.

Speaker 3:

Right. And yeah, and there's that phrase, you know, you don't know what you don't know. As we, as we grew our business, it was, it was always that journey. I mean, I remember going to personal development conferences and business growth conferences and things and the light bulb just turning on like things just clicking and going, Oh, okay. That's how they do that. And now you know it, it's amazing to think about just how powerful systems are. Because you know, look at, look at Amazon for example. I mean that is a systems based company. They can, you can order anything on the internet and say it's at your door in two days, sometimes one day. And that's just based on sheer sheer systems.

Speaker 2:

Everything from checking that it's, you know, having it updated online to making sure it's in stock to having somebody it, I mean all

Speaker 4:

of that is automated, right? Yeah. And it's amazing because they're, you know, business owners, myself included, will often complain about little things and sometimes this ball bag, uh, boggles my mind. I get so confused as to like how certain vendors can't do a very simple thing when I can say I can order something from across the country in FedEx. We'll have it here in two days. Like, why can't you deliver? Why can't grub hub deliver the right food to my, to my thing and I can FedEx you know, something, you know, because one has very good system and the other one's working the kinks out of theirs. Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. It's, it's interesting. I could talk about systems all day, but I, I, I won't do that. I feel like it's a certain personality type when you get really irritated by like poor systems. And that's totally me.

Speaker 4:

Like when I go to restaurants, I'm like, why does, why is this work this way when it shouldn't work that way? Or you know, you go to a website and something doesn't work right, like irks me the food sake and too long I want to know what the KPIs are for getting it out of the kitchen and on the mind. Are you testing this? Yeah. That's probably not fun to go to dinner with. Probably not. Yeah, we can improve it. Do you ever get that where you, where you sometimes I'll get this where I'll be meeting with somebody and I can just see the problems like so clearly, but I don't have the time or the resources to help that demeanor to truthfully likes to kind of seek my teeth in and help that person. Absolutely. And it's, it's so hard too because a lot of those things, it's kind of like a, it's almost a disservice to like highlight a problem and then not help them.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, that's a great point. And so it's definitely, and that's something I've had to work with being a small business owner is I'm in a lot of great communities and have a great network of people that I know could really benefit from what I know and what I offer. And it's like you can only help so many people at a time and do it really well too, right? Yeah. Yeah. Because if you, if you kind of dabble a little bit, if you, if you, I mean I've had the experience where, especially when, you know, we can talk about your podcast shortly about this podcast. I'll have people who come in, they've got a great idea or I'll talk them through an issue. Um, but I don't really have the time to, and I'm not a coach, you're a coach. I don't have the time to kind of dissect the problem and walk them through that.

Speaker 4:

I'll give them a little bit of time, give him a book or something. But I almost feel like I maybe shouldn't have said anything. Well, it's kind of like, you know what, if somebody told you like your hair doesn't look that great and I know that there's a way that I could fix it, but I don't have time to tell you. And then you're going to go home and be like, well, what do I do with my hair? It feels, you know, now I know it's awful. It's like if you spotlight a problem but like don't help them, it's almost worse. I know. Well yeah, and there's, you know, there was a, there was a seminar that I went to and there's a guy there, his name is Cameron Harold. He is, he's guy who runs the COO Alliance. So he says the number, it's, it's a, it's a group. They do these masterminds and it's for CEOs. So it's your, your chief operating officer. And he says it's the number one place for your number two guy, which is the, you know, kind of second in command. And,

Speaker 3:

and he had talked about, uh, why America is so entrepreneurial. Why does the United States have so many entrepreneurs and why do we grow so many things? Invent so many things. And the story that he told, and I probably told it before on the podcast, was that back when, when people were immigrating into North America, there, there was a certain level of risk that was required in order to make that journey. You're leaving your whole family. You have no idea where you're going. The earth, you may fall off the end of the earth, you have no idea what's going to happen, and you're just going to go to this country, plop down and try to build a life in, in a land that you've never been to. You can't call somebody and say, Hey, how's it going over there? It's just

Speaker 2:

you don't know what resources are available.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. Right. So the just genetically is his argument that these people were more predisposed to risk than other people throughout the world. The people who stayed behind in Europe were, were risk averse, and the people who got on the boats were risk tolerant. They were able to tolerate that risk. And so he says the United States, you know, just, just genetically speaking, we're kind of cultivated to, uh, to be entrepreneurial. That being said, he also said, you know, basically that a lot of people who are entrepreneurs should not be entrepreneurs. I totally agree with that. Yeah. I was going to ask, that's the, that was all the preface your experience as, as a coach working with these people, how do you, how do you have that conversation? How do you navigate that?

Speaker 2:

Oh, well, I've never told somebody that they shouldn't be in business anymore, which feels like a really heavy thing to say. Um, I, it's hard because I'm obviously a big advocate for entrepreneurship. I love supporting small business and I think that there's this weird paradigm kind of going on. You know, before you had just mentioned that story, I would have thought that we're so naturally entrepreneurial because of all the freedom we have in all of the social media content that, that shows all of these success stories of entrepreneurship. And there's this real social culture around being brave and, and how cool it is to be out on your own. And who needs to work for the man and you get flexible hours. And it's kinda like this pedestal thing to be an entrepreneur when really I think it's just as impressive and just as impactful and just as amazing to do something really, really well with a team or working for somebody else. And so I think that there needs to be a dialogue around if there's something you want to do or build or create, you don't have to take all the risk and responsibility of doing it in your own business. There might actually be a way that you could go add value in some other way to some other company that needs that thing. Right. You know, and I don't know why that's any less than,

Speaker 3:

yeah, I completely agree with that. And there's, I think there's been kind of a development lately and you've got a lot of the, you know, the, the influencers now are all, you know, entrepreneurs by their own declaration, not because they've actually started much businesses or anything, but it's kind of in Vogue. It's, it's cool. It's cool to be an entrepreneur for sure. Big time. Yeah. And so, you know, it's, yeah. Like, you know, movie stars great or a famous musician is great, but some of the biggest celebrities are entrepreneurs. You've got, you know, like Gary V and you know, all these guys you just run around and they just, uh, show how cool it is to live that lifestyle of helping people grow their businesses. Right. And maybe that's not for everybody.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. And thinking about all the risks and rewards that come with it, you know, working for yourself is really mentally and emotionally exhausting and it's hard on your relationships and it's tough on your finances. Self employment tax is a real thing and it's tough, you know, on your schedule and on your family and in different seasons of life it's gonna make more sense for you. You know, I actually started becoming self employed because I had a lot of health issues. I wasn't necessarily, I wasn't particularly happy in the corporate world, but I didn't hate it. And I planned on working my way up and just had my side hustle for some extra income and cause I loved it and I just was dealing a lot of health issues and I was like, you know what, it's easier to go to the doctor and rest when I need to if I work from home for myself. And so it made the most sense in that season. And now obviously I love it and I've grown into it, but it's, you have to think about what makes sense for you. And in a lot of cases I think you can use your skill and your passion with somebody else instead of doing it on your own and taking on all of the responsibility that comes with being self employed.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. So your background was you actually did work for a bigger corporate?

Speaker 2:

I did, yeah. All through college. And then after college too.

Speaker 3:

And then you kind of ran into some health stuff and then so yours was kind of out of necessity, but it sounds like you also had a lot of the tendencies growing up with your car wash business.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I've had small businesses my whole life. I'd had like gift wrapping businesses and carwash businesses and yeah,

Speaker 3:

D w what do you think cultivated that? I mean were your parents

Speaker 2:

yeah, my mom was an entrepreneur so she was, she's been like entrepreneurial mother of the year and she's always had side hustles and small businesses and I know that her and my dad had a business together before I was born. And so it's always been in my family. Yeah.

Speaker 3:

So kind of an, it's kind of in your DNA like we had talked about. Yeah. And so what, what led you to the nutrition space?

Speaker 2:

So I knew nothing about nutrition or health and growing up my family was all pretty overweight and unhealthy and we didn't know what we didn't know. And I had a lot of body image issues from as young as I can remember. And if they just got worse and worse than I had, I dealt with a lot of, well not a lot, a couple of eating disorders in middle school and into high school. And they got really bad and I had to go to therapy and it was me trying to navigate how to finally feel good about myself. And then I started working at a global gym at lifetime fitness and I would see all these people doing these shows and they would be so lean and tan and they would have trophies for how awesome they looked. And I thought if I can get on stage and win a trophy for how I look, then I'll finally feel better about myself.

Speaker 2:

Which in retrospect you probably guessed that's not the answer. So I did. I started bodybuilding and went and won and, and uh, you know, spoiler alert, I didn't feel any better about myself at 6% body fat as they do now. And so when I gained all the weight back after competing cause you go in these cycles of gaining and losing and gaining, losing, I thought there has to be something to the food thing because my training is not changing, but what's changing is how much I'm eating and what I'm eating. And so I changed my major from journalism to nutrition in college. And just dove head first into it. Yeah. Yeah. So it was really out of a need for me to better understand food and, and when I was going through all of that and learning about it and how it affects your body and how it makes you feel and how it makes you look, I was like, I could help other people with this too. There has to be other people struggling with this.

Speaker 4:

Yeah. And that's another hot topic right now too, is nutrition as it always is. But I'm kind of plugged into the debate that's going on right now over the game changers movie. Did you see that movie? Yeah. And so I know you're, you're a podcast are also, and so Joe Rogan had Chris Kresser, Chris Kresser on or something. [inaudible] customer or something like that. Yeah. And had him on and then, uh, had the other gentleman who, who wrote that or who director, you know, started in the, in the game changers movies on. So I've been listening to that debate back and forth and there's, you know, it's, it's, it's very interesting on, on how kind of um, dug in. Everybody gets over nutrition. Totally. It's like religion. It is. People get, so this works and that doesn't, yeah, it's hilarious cause it's so individual. It is and it's such a complicated topic because I, I've had a lot of people on the podcast talking about nutrition.

Speaker 4:

I know you have to on your show and everybody's got kind of a little, a little different tweak it, it feels like to me, and especially now, I mean, you've got the vegans, you got the paleos, you've got the ketos, you've got the carnivores, you have everything. And these people are just like at each other's throats over this stuff that, that interview on Joe's show was extremely heated. I'm like, I'm listening to it like uncomfortable. You're like, Ooh. Yeah. And Chris is debating this guy who's like a, you know, 37 level black belt. I'm like, I'm like, good Lord, that guy's going to jump across the table. Very smart. I followed him for a long time, but he's also very calm and not great at coming to the fight. Yeah. He's like, all right man, like all right bro. What's your bro? All right. Okay. I don't know what a forest plot is. Great. All right, next point. So yeah, it's, it's pretty funny. Where do, so I know you do a lot of nutrition, you train other coaches. Tell me about kind of your philosophy or what their approaches,

Speaker 2:

yeah, so we use a macro based approach. So counting your macros, which is your protein, carbs and fat, protein, carbs and fats, which equates to your total calories. And you know, I am always, we've, I've had, I've worked with lots of clients, they're like, I want to try vegan, I want to try this, I want to try this. And, and the most important thing I think is knowing why you're doing what you're doing. And someone else that Joe Rogan has on often is Andy Galpin who I really agree with and he, everything he always answers questions with. It depends. And I'm sure it drives the audience nuts.

Speaker 4:

That's what we learned in law school. Every answer to every question is it depends. Yeah, totally.

Speaker 2:

And so to say that

Speaker 3:

one diet works for everybody or one way of eating, you know, I think it's just, it's, it's just not true. And so we use a macro based approach with my clients. But I think most diets agree that you need to eat more real foods and then I think it's becoming more, you know, so not just plant based foods but foods that are naturally raised and don't have a bunch of added chemicals and ingredients. Right. So, um, I think more and more diet protocols so to speak, and people are recognizing that there's so much more to it than just the food. So I'm obviously a big believer in therapy cause it worked really well for me. I think counseling and understanding your relationship with food is really important. I think your environment is super important. Your stress levels, your sleep, you know what you're doing for fitness.

Speaker 3:

So there's so many other things that play into it that to think it all boils down to just what you're eating, um, is it's just not looking at the whole picture. Yeah. Yeah. There's a lot of variables that go into everything that we do. Sort of boil it down to say you should never eat an animal based product is I think way too narrow of a focus. Right. I completely agree. So you, you had mentioned, you know, obviously nutrition is important to you because of your, you know, body, excuse me, bodybuilder, you do CrossFit, you know, you coach other people. Uh, but a lot of it kind of, it sounds like it's stemmed from, from something that was going on internally with you. Right. And the reason why, and we're all guilty of this, it's thinking that doing something is, is going to fill a hole in yourself and then you find out that it doesn't, for me, I, I used alcohol to, to, to deal with my own stuff. Uh, how did you work yourself through that? Filling that void?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, which is a heavy question. I know. I'm like, how do I boil like 10 years of work down to a [inaudible] answer? Um, it's a couple things. So definitely can't say enough about mental health and counseling and therapy. That was a huge thing for me. And, and on that note, you know, if people have tried counseling before or if they're have mixed feelings about it, I've gone through lots of counselors. So I don't necessarily think it's common to the first person you drive with and everything's great and right. It's an investment of money and investment of time. It's not fun to talk about the things that you're struggling with, um, or to try new counselors and to trust new people. So that's a hard, that's a hard work to do. But that was really helpful for me. Um, community and finding fitness, that has been a different focus.

Speaker 2:

So what I mean by that is, you know, bodybuilding is focused on building muscle and looking a certain way. And when I found CrossFit, where we prioritize community and showing up consistently and how hard you're working, but not necessarily the score that you got or, or what you did that day. But more about the fact that you were there and you high-fived your friends and you supported each other. That was huge for me. So having that community of people that are all just trying to be fitter, better people instead of trying to look a certain way, um, is probably the second most important thing that's, that's changed that, uh, outlook for me.

Speaker 3:

Right. But as you mentioned, it's a long journey.

Speaker 2:

Absolutely. It's, I mean, I really honestly remember feeling awful about the way that I looked from elementary school and then it got really bad in the middle school. I mean, so I was young.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. That's a, that's young to be having that kind of self awareness.

Speaker 2:

Totally. And I'm, you know, I'm 25 now and so it's been 10 plus years of working through this stuff. Um, but I, I feel the healthiest and happiest with myself right now than I ever have. And I think it's largely attributed to, I take care of myself now more than I ever have in terms of hydration and food and sleep and community and stress levels and all of those things.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. And it's great that you are now helping other people understand that same process. I think a lot of people don't necessarily understand how much work it takes, that self-development. Self-improvement is so important. And just anecdotally, I mean I've had a lot of friends who asked, you know, why don't you go to all those seminars? Why are you always wait? It was on a plane somewhere. Like, isn't that, isn't that stupid? The same thing isn't the same. Like what? Like what are you doing all that for? And it's because of that. I've, I've recognized that that stuff does help me kind of develop myself personally, which will translate into everything else in my relationships and in my business and in my health and fitness. But some people just don't, they just don't understand that dynamic. Why do you think that is? What, what, what are people, what are people missing?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I do think it's kind of a, you don't know what you don't know. Yeah. I wasn't in a personal growth and personal development until maybe four years ago. So, even when I was going through therapy and, and even right into CrossFit, cause I'm new cross about five years, I still didn't really understand the idea that you would actively try to get uncomfortable to make yourself a better person. Like that was just not something on my radar. And so meditation or journaling or visualization or personal growth conferences, I just went to my first personal growth conference about a year ago. Um, rise, which is Rachel Hollis and Dave Hollis. Okay. It's excellent. Super good. I would highly recommend it. Um, and uh, and this idea of like collaborating with people versus competing with people like that was all so foreign to me. Um, so I really think it starts with just once people like dip their toe in, I think it's really addicting. But if you just don't have anybody in your circle that's into it, you just don't even like know that it's a thing, you know?

Speaker 3:

Yeah. It's just fascinating to me. I always like talking to coaches because I'm, I'm always curious as to kind of what motivates people to make that initial contact. Like, and I would agree there was a time when I had no idea. I mean actually that's not really true. I kind of was always interested in that stuff. I read, you know, how to win friends and influence people when I was a boy, you know, just, just flipping through it and I don't know why I started or whatever, but I've always, I, I got, I got the fire at a young age to kind of explore that world. Whereas a lot of people, you know, they don't have that experience. So it's always curious to me what causes people to say or to reach out you and say, you know, maybe I, maybe I should make a change in some area. Yeah. You know, what is that, what causes that?

Speaker 2:

I would say most of the time that I've recognized it is more of a superficial thing. At least that's what they think. And then it becomes a deeper thing. So they'll reach out and say, I want to lose weight for my wedding, or I want to, you know, feel good for my wife or I, you know, it's, it's usually more of a superficial thing. And then as we get into it and they start to realize that they can feel better and that they have to face their emotions and they have to get clear about why they don't feel significant in their relationship or why they feel the need to whatever it is. Um, that's when they start to really open up that work. And I do challenge my clients to read and listen to podcasts and I give them recommendations for things like that. And a lot of times they haven't even thought about stuff like that or don't see how it's related until they start to dip their toe in.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, that's very holistic of you. I mean, you're looking, so you start with the end goal in mind, but you've got all these other tools and modalities that people can use to reach that.

Speaker 2:

People aren't even, I mean, in my program, they're not even allowed to get to worry about the amount of food that they're eating. I mean, allowed, so to speak. Um, you know, they're not encouraged to care about the amount of food they're eating or take ingredients out until they've started to journal and started to evaluate their sleep habits and started to evaluate how they're setting themselves up for success instead of grabbing a bar in the middle of the day. Cause you haven't thought about what you're going to do for lunch that day. Like we focus a lot on the behaviors and the foundational stuff because I think that's so much more important and important to longterm success. It doesn't matter if you have a black and white eat this, don't eat that. If you don't know what to do when you go out to dinner with your family or you eat birthday cake and then you feel bad about it, that's a much bigger issue. In my opinion.

Speaker 3:

It's, I think it's 100% accurate. When, when I was starting, when I started looking at, and you know I had, I had uh, some difficult things happen in my life and I was drinking a lot and it wasn't because it in my mind it wasn't because, you know, I liked alcohol and I couldn't stop the alcohol. I had an internal problem with my thinking and my understanding and how I was processing these different events and how I was dealing with that loss and some guilt and some shame and all of those things which you can't deal with. You can stop drinking. Right? But those issues don't go away. You can stop eating so much food, but that can go away. You can win a bodybuilding contest or appear on stage and you still have those gaping holes.

Speaker 2:

Absolutely. I mean the fact is I didn't have any self love or self worth. And so when I was sitting at home after the show, like spray tanned and orange at the trophy in my hand and the Tiara in my head and I was like, I don't feel good about myself. It's, it's kind of a hopeless, like, well shoot, I thought this was the thing, you know, what do you do now? That's not a fun place to be, but in retrospect it's like there was a whole list of work that I needed to do.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, yeah. I was, I was at a, uh, there's a, there's a local organization called the genius network, Joe Polish. Joe Polish. Yeah. I was just there Monday, Tuesday, awesome event. And this told this story of a really renowned guy, you may or may not know him. Um, he's, he's, you know, impressive guy. And he was telling us this story about, uh, he was a kind of at the pinnacle of his career, everything was going right. Huge company, all these employees. And they were releasing this, uh, this movie that was made for him as Hollywood movie made about this guy. Like everything was amazing and he shows up to the premiere and he has this crippling depression because the theater's not full, you know, and he's just like, God, this is a failure. I'm a failure. Like, this is a horrible, and that's one of the burdens of, of being an entrepreneur. It's this thing, it's this idea that you're always pushing yourself. You're always grinding away and you're always kind of striving for the next victory, the next accomplishment. But even when you have Hollywood releasing a movie for you, I mean he talks about being like kind of in the fetal position, like just really devastated that it didn't match his expectations. And it wasn't till 10 years later when he's done all the work, a lot of what you've talked about that now he becomes, you know, more of a more of a kind of a full human.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. And I think a lot of people can relate to that, where they've put this thing on this pedestal and then they get there and they're like, Hmm, this isn't quite what I thought it would feel like. Or it feels good for a second. And then you know, whether it's a promotion or something with your family or a business thing, it's like you, you think when you get to that destination it's going to feel so significantly different. And I don't think that's the case

Speaker 3:

most of the time. Yeah. Related to that, how do you, you know, entrepreneurs, I think they get a lot of kind of flack for being like never satisfied, never content. How do you, how do you manage that? How do you deal with that in your life? Because you're very ambitious, you've got all these projects going on, you're highly accomplished, you've got a team of people. I mean you, you know, you take care of yourself, you do all these things well, do you, do you get those comments? Like it was just slow down, can't you be happy? Yeah. Just relax, take it easy. Go on vacation.

Speaker 2:

Right, right. Uh, there's a couple of things I believe in celebrating everything. So I think when I first started, I used to be this happened. That's great. Okay. Now onto the next thing and now I'm very intentional. It doesn't even have to be a huge thing and I'm going to go out to dinner with my friends and celebrate it or I'm going to, you know, do something that makes it feel very like, let's marinate in this for a second and really acknowledge like the work that went into this thing. Um, so I'm really big into celebrating everything cause I think it gives you a little bit of longer of a chance to really own own that. Um, and then I also think, you know, going back to the process and getting to the end goal, it's, I think it's funny in entrepreneurship to constantly think that you'll be happy when you get to X because if you have an entrepreneur mindset, there's never going to be an ax, right?

Speaker 2:

You're going to create something that they're gonna wanna create something else, then you're going to make it better. So if you can't be happy along the way, I don't think, I think that's the problem. You're not going to be happy when you get there. So at the beginning I definitely used to struggle more with next thing, next thing, next thing. But now I'm enjoying learning and failing, growing and building so much that it's kind of like I'll get to X when I get there. I really enjoy the day to day, which you have. I think you have to get to that place.

Speaker 4:

Yeah. So it's more about the journey than it is the destination. 100%, which sounds so woo woo. But it's really important if you don't want to drive yourself nuts. Yeah. And I still drive myself nuts, but it is, it is important to recognize those. And I think that's very Sage advice to, to kind of stop and celebrate it and be present in the moment because that's not happening again. Right.

Speaker 2:

Absolutely. And it's, it's so fine. Like when I meet, I haven't been, you know, I've been doing this about three years and when I meet business owners, they're where I was three years ago. I'm like, enjoy this. Like you're so stressed out and you're so like, I just want to be there. And like those are like the most fun times that I remember of entrepreneurship is trying to figure out how to accept payments from my clients. And trying to figure out how to file an LLC. And it's like all the fun stuff, you know, it's like when you look back to college and you're like the good old days when I was poor because it was fun to like try to figure out how you're going to pay for groceries. Right? So it's like we're always trying to get to the next thing, but like right now is fun and I'm sure in three years from now I'll be like, gosh, remember when I was 25 and I thought that I knew what I was doing in business. You know? And I think having that acknowledgement that like you're always learning and like you need to like enjoy this piece is important.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, that's good advice that I should definitely take. So thanks for sharing that. Um, all right, well, so speaking of, of you know, your other projects, yeah. You've got a podcast. So tell me about that.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so it started as a nutrition podcast in line with my business. And I did it for about a year and was like, I'm burnt out and talking about nutrition. And I just, I fell out of love with it. And so then I took a couple months off and was like, do I keep doing the podcast? And, and I had this weird fear of pivoting, like kind of like, well I said it was nutrition, podcast has been nutrition podcasts and then I kind of got clear one love podcasting, who cares if I pivot? Like the people that want to listen to the other stuff will stay and the people that don't believe, and that's okay. And so I recorded a whole episode about like, I call it the transition where I talk about, Hey, I'm actually not just nutritionist. I love personal growth and business and, and you know, mindfulness things and all of these other topics that it's a disservice to you if I love these things and know people that could come on and speak advice to these things if I don't share them with you. Um, and so since then it's pivoted to more of just a lifestyle podcast. So I do a lot of still health stuff like acupuncture and holistic health and nutrition. But we do a lot of mindfulness. And meditation and personal growth and uh, you know, self-employment and entrepreneurship and building teams and all kinds of fun stuff. So very lifestyle focused. Um, I do mostly guest interviews. I've done a handful of solo shows, but, uh, it's a lot of fun. I really love it.

Speaker 4:

Yeah. I'm looking at it and he got, you know, some weightlifting people on here. You got, you know, voting and I did one on the importance of voting. Yeah. It's been kind of stuff which, which, which I love. And that's kind of the model that I started with with this podcast. There's no, there was no real rhyme or reason, you know, there was no niche

Speaker 3:

that I was focused on and I've had kind of the reverse thought, right? Like, Oh man, you know, like the shows all over the place. It's way too broad. I'm talking to you one day and then I'm talking to somebody selling hair products and other days it's like, what, what am I doing here? But it's, it is my show. So, and I want to talk, I want to talk about

Speaker 2:

whatever I want to talk about. Yeah. And I think, you know, people are going to get the most value if I'm engaged and I'm interested and I'm, it's not something I'm gonna keep doing if I'm not enjoying it. So that's how I look at it is, you know, the people that are listening to it are probably somewhat aligned with a similar mindset as I am. And so whether I bring on somebody from acupuncture or somebody that owns a real estate company, if I have the central message, if I'm, here's the tools that I'm trying to give you to make your quality of life better, it's still going to drive home the same message just in different voices, which I think is really valuable.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. And you've got how many episodes now yet? I think I'm at 35 or 36 two a month. Two a month. And you've been doing it for like two just under two years. Just under two years. Is there anything that, I'm always curious, you know, anything unexpected that has come out of the podcast that you didn't anticipate at the beginning. So you got to kind of rewind your brain back to when you first started.

Speaker 2:

Well, when I first started, it was so much harder than I thought it was going to be. I thought it was like you buy a microphone on Amazon and press go. So the whole idea of like different things for your microphones and publishing it and learning how to edit audio. I mean, I had no audio editing experience when I started, so, but that was that in my personality. It's like if I say I'm going to do something, if it gets hard, I'm like, it motivates me more, you know? So I enjoyed that, but it was so much harder than I thought it was going to be, which shouldn't be discouraging. It's just like support your local podcasts or it's not as easy as it looks. Right. It's true. Um, and you know, interviewing and, and all of that was much harder than I thought it would be.

Speaker 2:

But it's been really cool. You know, I've gotten really amazing stories from people that I've interviewed and even I've done several, you know, the solo shows I have done have been very vulnerable about my body image and, and struggling with depression and struggling with pivoting in my business. And, and so the feedback that I've gotten on some of those, it, that's probably what surprised me the most is it's kind of like you put something out there and you're like, maybe people will listen to it, maybe they won't. You don't really like ever see the person that's listening to your podcast. And so when I've gotten messages, you know, I, I remember one, I did a episode with a woman, Shelby Lawson who teaches coaches and fitness professionals how to be more body positive. And so we did a whole episode on body positivity. So somebody emailed me and basically said, you know, I, I felt really awful going on this like honeymoon with my husband and I was going to wear a one piece.

Speaker 2:

And then I listened to your podcast and I was like, screw it. I'm going wear the two piece that I love. And I feel so much better going in this honeymoon. And you know, that's, it really boiled down. But he like brought me to tears that not only did somebody listen to it and think it was valuable, but like it actually changed their behavior for the better. And that's really cool. That's awesome. So you know, there's so much lemon, I don't even know what the count is, you know, millions of podcast episodes out there. Yeah. It's really cool that there's a free convenient way for people to absorb content from people that they would never get to meet in real life.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, yeah, I completely agree with that. It's weird. You never, it's one of those things that you really never know who's listening and you get that, you get the feedback like that and you know, okay, if I have one listener and I can just help that cost them

Speaker 2:

and, and I always go back to, you know, if what for every one person that says something, there's 10 that don't. And I went and saw Tom bill you last night. He was here doing a talk at standup live in Phoenix and he does impact theory podcast and health theory podcast. And it's so funny. When I was going there, I was like, I feel like Tom has been my mentor for the last two years and I've never met him, but I've listened to every podcast episode he's ever done. And I follow him on social media and I write down principles that I've learned from his episodes. And so it feels like he's mentored me and I was like, wow, I'm going to go watch somebody that I've actually never seen in person, but I feel so related to, and it's, I just think it's really neat that we're in an age where that's the thing.

Speaker 4:

It is weird. It is a weird thing. And I've noticed that too. I mean there's, there are certain people that I listen to that I've listened to growing up, uh, that I, I feel closer to then some people in my family. 100% absolutely. It's a weird, it's a weird thing to think, you know? I know it's like I know this person personally, but I don't never met him. But you like know their kids and their family and the things they like and yeah,

Speaker 2:

big believer in inclusivity and accessibility and like how do we give everybody a seat at the table? And so I think, you know, there's, there's so many great programs and masterminds and things out there that are paid and should be because people are providing value in exchange for monetary, you know, for in exchange for money. But there's so much free content out there. And I think sometimes we get wrapped up in this idea that we can't do certain things because we don't have certain resources. But there are so much amazing information in podcast and on Google and in YouTube videos

Speaker 4:

I know literally help you change your life. I know, I know. I learned, I basically learned how to podcast Oh, 100% from YouTube. That's what I did.

Speaker 2:

And I just like an editing audio. I mean, I remember the video, it was like 30 minutes of this guy editing episode and I would watch it and then do it.

Speaker 4:

I watch it and do it in YouTube university. Yeah. It's, it's, it's amazing. It's so cool. Yeah, I'm excited. That's awesome that you're, that you're doing it. And so are your interviews local?

Speaker 2:

Um, so they started all local and then I started going remote probably about a year ago.

Speaker 4:

Yeah. Yeah. How was that transition?

Speaker 2:

I'm really easy actually. I thought it would be much harder. I use zoom and it works great. Yeah.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, yeah, of course. Awesome. Yeah. I make everybody come in. Yeah. Yeah. I like to look at him. I eventually got to,

Speaker 2:

well, so a zoom. I do, I don't record the video because I haven't really found, I'm not on YouTube so I haven't really found a need for it. But um, I do see them so that just makes the conversation a little bit more natural. Um, but, uh, I just got to a point where there's people I wanted to interview that didn't live here and I was like,

Speaker 4:

Oh, alright. I guess I'll do that. I'll probably break down at some point too. Cause I do want to talk. There's a lot of people I want to talk to, but they don't live here. But that's okay. So that's fun. And what's, what's, what's kind of the future of, of where you want to take all of these different projects?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I am really into the podcasting thing right now. So I have a couple people that I'm doing their production for. I just wrapped up the first season. There's a company in Scottsdale called after five.io and it's a web development company for freelancers. And they brought me in, they heard my podcast, found me on LinkedIn and said, do you want to host and produce our show? Uh, we want to start a podcast. So I helped them from the concept to the design artwork to hosting, producing. It was awesome. Uh, and the first season just came out. So we're doing five in lieu of the five brand. We're doing five episodes at a time. Um, so it's called practical empowerment. Cool. And so that was a super fun project to do something a little bit different than my podcast. And, um, I've been doing some advising on helping people start their podcasts. So I'm not totally sure yet where it's going. Um, but I know it's kind of in that podcast content creation world.

Speaker 4:

That's awesome. Yeah. And that's kind of where I am with this podcast. It's like I don't really know where this is going to go. I enjoy doing it. You know, it's, I'm not, I'm not making millions of dollars off of it, that's for sure. But it's fun to do. And I like talking to people

Speaker 2:

and I think that's important to have those things. You know, I am very intentional about like I go to singing lessons and I'm never going to be a singer and I go to things and do things that aren't related to my business and I didn't always do that. And I think that's really important for you mentally and emotionally to do things that like, you don't necessarily know where it's going to go, you know? So like podcasting for me is, you know, maybe someday it'll make money, maybe someday it'll do X, but in the meantime it's just really fun.

Speaker 4:

It is fun. Yeah. I mean we would have never met her, had had a conversation. And here we are with our own podcast shows, talking about podcasts on a podcast. It's like a matrix. We're like three levels, deep inception conversations here. So. All right. Um, what about, I wanted to ask kind of, you know, we talked about systems at the beginning. I wanted to ask you about some of your personal systems or routines that you have. Like do you have a morning routine? Do you have a go to bed routine if you'd be willing to share?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, absolutely. So my morning routine changes with the season for sure. So I've, I've never had one thing that I've stuck to for longer than a few months, but then I'll like revisit things. So, um, it kinda depends on the season that I'm in. So right now, for example, I'm working out a lot in the evenings, so I used to be much more of a 5:30 AM or right now I'm working out at night. So I, I really love watching the today show. And so I'll wake up in the morning, I get my coffee, I do my journaling, I do my meditation through Headspace, which is an app. Um, and then I watch the today show and check my emails and make breakfast. And it's like productive but slow and relaxed. And I think, you know, there's so much stuff out there about morning routines. It's like finding what works for you. You know, a lot of people will say you need to move your body first thing in the morning, you need to exercise first thing in the morning.

Speaker 2:

But for me, working from home all day and being self employed, I get like no social interaction and all my friends work out at night. So right now it's great to go to the gym at night cause I get my social time and my workout. Whereas before when I was going in the morning, I was more alone and then I was still alone all day, you know. So it's, it's taking what works then uses, you know, works well for you and using that and then leaving what doesn't work for you? Um, as far as other systems, one that I talk about a lot, that has been a game changer for me, which probably sounds silly is I'm I scheduled text messages, so I go in once a week and look at what coffee dates do I have this week, whose birthday is it this week, whether it's a client or a friend.

Speaker 2:

Um, or if I know, you know, like one of my best girlfriends has an interview today. So when she told me last week she had interviewed today, I scheduled a text her this morning that said, good luck on your interview today. And it just makes me feel like I'm prioritizing my relationships without having to constantly think about them. Um, and it's, it's just makes me feel like I'm not forgetting anyone. That's a great idea. So I do it, yeah, once a week. And that's a big one for me. I pretty much live and die by my calendar and things that help me control my account.

Speaker 3:

That's a great idea. Uh, I love that. I think that's brilliant and it's very important.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I mean even I'll go in and just text, like schedule a text to a friend that I haven't talked to in awhile, you know, just so that I don't, and that's another routine that I'm not as consistent with. I probably do it three times a week right now is I'll send a voice text to somebody. So just kind of like scroll through my contacts and be like, who haven't I talked to or who? And I'll just say, Hey, it's like I was thinking of you and I don't know why, but I just hope you have a fantastic Friday and like that's it. It doesn't need to be like, let's get coffee soon and then we never do it. And then it feels like an empty promise. Right. It's just, Hey, I'm thinking of you, you know?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, yeah. I think that's, that's awesome. Well that's great. So when you were talking about your morning routine, it reminded me of, there was a Jeff Bezos, actually he does that. He, his morning routine, somebody asked him that question, it's on a YouTube channel and he, he used the word putters. He says, when I get up in the morning, I just putter around. Not that you're doing that, but, but he, that's what he says. He says, I get the newspaper and I just putter around for like for like two hours is what he said. And uh, when you're worth $150 billion, we'll do whatever you want to do. So he can put her as long as he wants. But it was, it was very fascinating to see how he thought through things because his system was, um, in, in the morning, it takes him a while to kind of get his brain moving.

Speaker 3:

And so he potters for the first couple hours and then he spends his time thinking a lot of thinking because his, his position now is that he makes, I think he said maybe three big decisions a year, like three critical decisions on the future of Amazon and everything that they're doing. And that's it. He kind of limits himself to those things and nothing else is happening in his mind. And I was just fascinated by how his morning was and how, how slow going it was because it's kind of the opposite of what year from a lot of people. Right? You should be up at five 35

Speaker 2:

minutes and then this is for 10 minutes and move your body and drink lemon

Speaker 4:

water and right. Right. And that doesn't work for him. And that was basically your point is the workout at night cause that works for you right now. Right.

Speaker 2:

And I'm, I'm very, and you just have to, self awareness is obviously easier said than done, but you have to think about what feels good to you. Like I am go, go, go all day long and I don't get distracted easily and I don't check my phone a lot throughout the day. And so if I am Gogo golf in the morning, I get up, then I get to 5:00 PM and I'm like, my brain has not had a chance to breathe all day. Right? So by having a slow morning, then I can go, go, go during my work day and then I don't get to the end of the day. And feel drained, you know, but it's a level of self awareness to realize that. And just to speak to what you said about um, three big decisions in a year. Something that I think is really interesting that we should be thinking about is the decisions we're making throughout the day and how to reduce those.

Speaker 2:

And so that kind of comes back to systems is you know, decision fatigue is a real thing and if you're waking up in the morning and you're like, what am I going to wear? What am I going to make for breakfast? Like and all of these decisions. And there's so many subconscious ones, you know, like the, the decision to get out of bed and things to brush your teeth that you aren't even thinking about. Those are all taking up energy. And so systems in terms of like what your morning routine is and what you're going to eat for lunch, you know, planning that out for the week and what you're going to wear the night before. It's not just for like the type a organized. It's like by saving energy on those decisions you make better decisions because you haven't spent all that

Speaker 4:

right. It's, it's hilarious that you brought that up cause I was just talking to my business partner Ryan about that yesterday actually about decision fatigue because we're, we're lawyers and when we were talking about it in the context of judges and judges sentencing people to go into custody. So if you, if you're representing somebody who's charged with a crime and the case is wrapped up and you have sentencing and you go in front of the judge and you're there in front of the judge at 9:00 AM when the judge is fresh, you're going to get a different outcome. A nice pot coffees cook just had a nice breakfast, they're ready to go. But you see them at 4:00 PM and they're just pissed off at the world. Everybody's going to prison and they want to close their day. How dare you ask for anything less. Bye. Bye. And so we were thinking about that. Okay. So how do we structure that? And you know, we want to incorporate that in a little bit more robustly into how we structure our calendar. And so it's funny that you brought it up cause it's 100% true

Speaker 2:

and I just think so many people just think that planning ahead or systems or or preparedness is like for a certain personality type or or means restriction and you can, I think, you know, discipline equals freedom, which is Jocko Willink spoke, right. You know, the more disciplined, the more planned and prepared you are, the more time and energy and emotion you have to do the things you want to do.

Speaker 4:

Right. Which also leaves. So creative time. Absolutely. You can't be creative if you're exhausted. Right. 100%. So you build that into your, into your schedule a little bit.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. I ha I build, um, I put meetings with myself. I call them holding like holding space in my calendar every single week, usually at least a few times week, uh, where I have nothing planned and I won't book anything over it. So I can just journal. So I can think sometimes I create something new on my website or design something and sometimes it's walking outside and listening to a podcast. But it is so important to, to build in that time because I don't think a lot of things happen by accident when it comes to how you spend your time, you know, or, or, or I should say, they do happen by accident. So if you want things to happen intentionally, you have to plan for it. Right. You know?

Speaker 3:

Right. Yeah. Yeah. And I, and I love that there's, it kind of comes full circle to what we were talking about even about nutrition. It's kind of about that self-awareness. You know, what works for you, what doesn't work for you. You don't need to fit yourself into somebody else's template of how to live their lives, which I think a lot of people do these days. They see a book, you know, the seven this or the six or the five things that you need to do to have a successful marriage. Well, those are probably good things, but it depends on who you're married to. Yeah. What does that, what does the other person think about that? Right? It's not a one size fits all solution for anything. And so I think being in tune with yourself and having that self awareness to, to you know, find what works for you, keep it, get rid of the other stuff.

Speaker 2:

Right. And again, self-awareness doesn't happen by accident. So like if people take nothing from this conversation, the one thing that I hope they would take is, is to build in time for that self-awareness. You know, like even if it's five minutes a day that you plug into your calendar at the end of the day, you know, literally five minute journal is something you get on Amazon. I think it's like 15 or 20 bucks and it's awesome. It kind of does this for you. But even if you don't want to spend money and just like any notebook, you know, writing down what was the best part of your day, what was the least like, what was the worst part of your day? What do you wish would have been better today? Like how are you feeling right now? And if you just did that every day for a week, two weeks, a couple months, you would find really amazing patterns in that, you know?

Speaker 3:

Right. Yeah. And gratitude also is a huge part of it. Yeah. And just sitting down and just that, that is a system that I am grateful for is just a pause and just remember what you're, what you're, what you have gratitude for.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. I have count the blessings tattooed on my foot, so I see it all the time. Yeah. I, uh, I, I couldn't agree more and after all the health issues that I've had, I mean, gratitude has been the thing that has helped a lot with that.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. It's funny, we were at the genius network and he asked us to fill out the opposite of that. So he gave us this, uh, this worksheet that says what pisses me off. And there were 10 things on there and you have to go through and write them all down. And you know, I was thinking through that and I filled my list out cause we needed to, but I was looking through that and you know, and I go, there's not a lot on there. Like I'm pretty, I'm pretty grateful, you know, for a lot of the things that are going on, I have to like dig down to find something that pisses me off. And I think in large part it's because of that conditioning is because every day I wake up and I say, okay, I'm grateful for my mom. I'm grateful that I'm sober, I've got a healthy, my body's healthy. Like I'm only like so much is going right in the world, but we want to, we want to kind of set that aside and focus on the guy who caught us off or the fact that our Amazon's not here today. It's tomorrow. What though? But it's not two days. That's ridiculous.

Speaker 2:

I heard something once that you can't be grateful and anxious at the same time. And I thought like that's always really stuck with me. Um, and it's so funny. Literally two days ago I was driving on the freeway and a rock hit my windshield. Now I've got a big old crack in the middle of my windshield and I was running late for something and it was kinda just like one of those days. And so when it happened I was like, Oh, I'm like really annoyed in the moment. And then out loud I was like, I'm grateful for this nice car that is driving me to my meeting and I'm grateful for straight roads and that I live in Phoenix and like out loud. I was like, you just need to state your gratitudes because you can't be mad and grateful at the same time. And it's like comical, but it works.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. There was a Tony Robbins event and there's another guy, I think he was, he was showing us a slide from another guy, Joe Dispenza, who heard him on podcasts. Yeah, exactly. Yeah. And he was showing, uh, he, he had this, uh, they were doing some, they had charts, basically they were measuring the frequency of your heart and your brain. And they were showing that when you were in a, in an angry, anxious state, they were completely out of alignment. So the, the frequencies in your head just did not match your heart. But when you were in gratitude and you could see the charts, they were in total alignment. Like it was really weird. Like the highs and the lows were in total in sync with one another. I know it was wild stuff and that's a whole different world that I haven't really taken a deep dive into, but there is a lot more going on with our body that is controlled with our mind that we can influence with our mind.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. I think something we do at my gym is uh, it's called, um, Oh gosh, what's the name of the book? It's like complaint free world I think. And it's this bracelet that you wear for 21 days and uh, every time you complain you got to switch risks and it's just to like build this awareness of when you're complaining. Yeah, it's, it's a really inexpensive book and a cool challenge and cause a really common thing at, in CrossFit, or probably any hard physical thing is to complain even though you're not necessarily upset about it. So let's say you have a great workout at the end, you're like, Oh, that was so hard. That's just conditioning your brain that it's hard. And, and what good does that do you, you know, so by wearing the bracelet now we say that was a good workout. I'm glad I did it. You know, that was a good test to fitness. Wow. I got better today. Right. And again, it sounds kind of silly, but it's amazing how much it changes the way you view things when you're like, Oh, this is a good opportunity to get better. Versus like, wow, that was awful. Even though you're glad you went. Yeah. Yeah. Just rephrasing it to a place of gratitude. Right, right.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. And talk to yourself nicely. Be nice to yourself. 100% right. So, all right, well we've talked a lot about what you do. What do you do for fun? What's, what's, when you're not grinding through all these different projects, what's kind of a nice thing that you do? Good question. No businesses and I'm just, I hate that. I hate that question. I hate when people ask me that question. It's a hard question to answer because a lot of what we do is fun. That's why we do it, right? I mean, everything, every time I wake up I'm not like, Oh, I've got to go to work. I gotta be there. It's like, all right, cool. I get to go lead a team. I get to help people with their cases. I get to build, you know, all of these different. So it's,

Speaker 4:

it's fair if that's

Speaker 2:

it's, I mean definitely that. Like I love, I love business and learning. Um, I love learning how to do new things. So I like trying new recipes. I like going to classes, I go, I go learn how to do things pretty often. I enjoy challenging myself in that way. Um, I've been taking singing lessons for a long time and love it. It's so much more challenging than I thought it would be. But I've just always loved singing shows and at some point I was like, well, why can't I be a good singer? And so I do that and I'm going to start guitar lessons soon. I just was in New York last week and we went to a Broadway show and I loved it. And I was like, I should take an acting class. Like I just, I like to try new things. So that's probably my fun thing is I like trying things that I'm not necessarily good at. Cause I think it keeps you humble. It gives you a new skill, it makes you well rounded. And I just think that's fun.

Speaker 4:

Well we'll probably see you on Broadway singing someday soon. Yeah. Since you got all that going. Yeah, my side hustle. Yeah, I love it. All right, well where are the best places for people to connect with you? So you've got a lot going on. I know, I know. Uh, you know, podcasts and all that stuff. We're working, they find it.

Speaker 2:

Um, Hey Presley's my Instagram and that's where everything is. I have all my links there. Hey Presley, creative.com is all the business stuff and then he pressed the nutrition.com is all of the nutrition coaching.

Speaker 4:

Awesome, and we're going to put all of that in the show notes and links to everything. Presley, thanks so much for coming on the show. I really enjoyed talking to [inaudible].

Speaker 2:

Yeah, this was great. Thanks for having me. Thank you.

Speaker 1:

The ruler nation podcast is brought to you by the R and R law group. Arizona's premier criminal defense and personal injury law firm available@wwwdotourourlawaz.com or give us a call, four eight zero four zero zero one three.