Gruler Nation Podcast

Episode #81: "Click Here When I Die" with Jon Braddock

January 08, 2020 Robert F. Gruler Jr., Esq.
Gruler Nation Podcast
Episode #81: "Click Here When I Die" with Jon Braddock
Chapters
Gruler Nation Podcast
Episode #81: "Click Here When I Die" with Jon Braddock
Jan 08, 2020
Robert F. Gruler Jr., Esq.

Jon Braddock is a business owner, entrepreneur, and the author of “Advisor or Vendor”, “RetireEase”, The My Life and Wishes Organizer” and the Amazon best seller “Click Here When I Die.” Jon has spent more than 30 years in the employee benefit and retirement plan consulting space. He was the founder of Benefit Design Corp. in Milwaukee, WI and founder/co-owner of ISG Advisors, LLC a Madison, WI based company where he served as President and CEO.  

 

Jon is responsible for the creation of Behold Vision Plans, the Foundation Benefit Life Insurance Plan and Healthcare Benefit Alliance, a strategic employee benefit alliance for healthcare organizations. Jon’s extensive advisory skills, entrepreneurial thinking and a personal family situation led to his newest company, My Life and Wishes, Inc., a secure cloud based digital planning and document storage business, which helps people prepare for life’s “what if’s”. 

 

Everyone knows that losing a loved one is difficult. The sadness and grief is hard enough. But without planning, it adds unnecessary stress, frustration, time and money, when closing out the final affairs. These are the things which divide families. That is why Jon's mission is to help one million families avoid this situation and make the process a little easier on everyone.  

 

Jon is offering all Gruler Nation listeners a 20% off discount with the promo code "grulernation." Sign up today at www.mylifeandwishes.com or if you have more questions shoot Jon an email at jon@mylifeandwishes.com and be sure to follow him on Facebook @mylifeandwishes!  

 

Please Like, Subscribe, and Comment below! 

  

#entrepreneur #author #advisor #mylifeandwishes #ClickHereWhenIDie #retirement #planning #consulting #founder #digitalplanning #documentstorage #lovedones #family #podcast #InspirationwithGrulerNation #inspire #gruler #inspiration #GrulerNation #GrulerNationPodcast #gnp #arizonapodcast #scottsdale #yesphx #phx  

 

The Gruler Nation Podcast is a show that focuses on conversations with interesting "Level 10" people passionate about changing the world with their work, relationships and ideas. The show is hosted by Robert Gruler, an attorney and founding partner of the R&R Law Group, a criminal defense law firm based in Scottsdale, Arizona focused on helping good people charged with crimes move forward with their lives.   

 

Interested in being on the show or have a guest recommendation? Email Robert directly at robert@rrlawaz.com or faith@rrlawaz.com and be sure to visit www.robgruler.com for more information! 

 

Support the show (https://www.ericshouse.org/donate/)

Show Notes Transcript

Jon Braddock is a business owner, entrepreneur, and the author of “Advisor or Vendor”, “RetireEase”, The My Life and Wishes Organizer” and the Amazon best seller “Click Here When I Die.” Jon has spent more than 30 years in the employee benefit and retirement plan consulting space. He was the founder of Benefit Design Corp. in Milwaukee, WI and founder/co-owner of ISG Advisors, LLC a Madison, WI based company where he served as President and CEO.  

 

Jon is responsible for the creation of Behold Vision Plans, the Foundation Benefit Life Insurance Plan and Healthcare Benefit Alliance, a strategic employee benefit alliance for healthcare organizations. Jon’s extensive advisory skills, entrepreneurial thinking and a personal family situation led to his newest company, My Life and Wishes, Inc., a secure cloud based digital planning and document storage business, which helps people prepare for life’s “what if’s”. 

 

Everyone knows that losing a loved one is difficult. The sadness and grief is hard enough. But without planning, it adds unnecessary stress, frustration, time and money, when closing out the final affairs. These are the things which divide families. That is why Jon's mission is to help one million families avoid this situation and make the process a little easier on everyone.  

 

Jon is offering all Gruler Nation listeners a 20% off discount with the promo code "grulernation." Sign up today at www.mylifeandwishes.com or if you have more questions shoot Jon an email at jon@mylifeandwishes.com and be sure to follow him on Facebook @mylifeandwishes!  

 

Please Like, Subscribe, and Comment below! 

  

#entrepreneur #author #advisor #mylifeandwishes #ClickHereWhenIDie #retirement #planning #consulting #founder #digitalplanning #documentstorage #lovedones #family #podcast #InspirationwithGrulerNation #inspire #gruler #inspiration #GrulerNation #GrulerNationPodcast #gnp #arizonapodcast #scottsdale #yesphx #phx  

 

The Gruler Nation Podcast is a show that focuses on conversations with interesting "Level 10" people passionate about changing the world with their work, relationships and ideas. The show is hosted by Robert Gruler, an attorney and founding partner of the R&R Law Group, a criminal defense law firm based in Scottsdale, Arizona focused on helping good people charged with crimes move forward with their lives.   

 

Interested in being on the show or have a guest recommendation? Email Robert directly at robert@rrlawaz.com or faith@rrlawaz.com and be sure to visit www.robgruler.com for more information! 

 

Support the show (https://www.ericshouse.org/donate/)

Speaker 1:

This is episode 81 of the Gruler Nation podcast. My name is Robert Gruler, joined today by Jon Braddock. John Braddock is the founder, creator of my life and wishes.com which is an awesome product. We're going to talk a lot about that, the reason behind creating it, what it does, what it solves, but before I do that, let me tell you a little bit more about John. So John is a highly accomplished

Speaker 2:

individually . He's a business owner, entrepreneur, author of a number of different books, advisor or vendor, retirees, the my life and wishes organizer. He's got an Amazon bestseller. He brought a copy here today. It's called click here when I die. If you're on video, you can see that. We're going to talk more about that. He's done a lot. He's got a big background with a number of different adviser , re companies, a healthcare benefit Alliance. He's been in this space for a very long time, which led to the creation of my life and wishes and we're going to tell you or we're going to ask John to tell us a little bit more about what that is. But first of all, I want to say, John , thanks for being here today,

Speaker 3:

Ryan. It's great to be here. It's a privilege.

Speaker 2:

So I definitely want to dive into the background on, on how my life in wishes came about. But before we do that, let's just give people an overview of what it does. What is this product? What is it solving? What does it helping people with?

Speaker 3:

Well , uh, the backend is this , um , like my book click here when I die, which is my irreverent take on, on all things a death that people don't want to talk about. But the bottom line is our product. If I don't make it home tonight, because we never know when that'll be literally at the touch of a button. My family will have access to everything they need to know from who the attorney is to where the wills and the trust documents are , logins, how to turn off Hulu, Amazon, Netflix, and all the recurring charges that continue. So literally taking the scavenger hunt that most people have to go on, compressing that into a very short period of time. So it's , it's an online platform. It's a portal where people are sort of storing their documents exactly as much or as little as they want and all their , uh , end of life directives is fuel. Uh , one thing that really stuck with me a number of years ago was a good friend. When I told him what we were doing, he looked at me wide eyes. He's like, Oh my God. And I'm like, what? What? He said, you know, I wish mom had told me she wanted to be cremated before I buried her. Yeah. Whoa . Yeah. And so I was like, I didn't have the guts to say, did you fix it later? Right, right.

Speaker 2:

Well, yeah, I mean, a lot of people, you know, this is something that people don't, don't think about. They don't want to think about it. It's not a sexy topic a lot of the time. But your story's interesting, right. Because you, you kind of had to navigate through this process, which is what inspired the actual creation of the, of the company and foundation of the product.

Speaker 3:

Exactly. Um, imagine this , uh , labor day. Yeah. 2013 beautiful sunny day in Wisconsin and my wife and I are out playing golf. We're on the fourth hole and her cell phone rings and she looks down, it's gotta take the call. [inaudible] and she goes, white dad died. Yeah. [inaudible] left the golf balls where they lay , drove to the house and you know, my father in law was still there. And what happened next with something I never , uh , had experienced. And until you go through it , uh, it's kind of a hard thing, you know, because the questions immediately start to come. It's kinda like, all right , what funeral home should we take them to? Um, I don't know. Right. You know, and then, you know, we knew he had a burial plot in those kinds of things, but once you get through that initial shock and those few days, then the challenge is really begin. My mother-in-law had been married by the way, 63 years. Yeah . On that day that he , uh, passed away at home. Um, she hadn't written a check. Paid a bill, done anything financial in 63 years. Yeah. And so really she was not allowed to help nor did she want to be a lot of help because she just lost her husband. Right. So we had to try and figure out everything, you know, where all the bank accounts were, where he kept the checks, was there a will and he saved everything. It sent us down a path of 10 months of trying to dig through all the paperwork and sort everything out. He was an IBM guy and so we actually used computer. Yeah . Um, we couldn't get in to some of his accounts to shut things down cause we didn't know who his best friend in high school was. Right , right. Challenge questions in the sort. Right. What color car did you drive in high school? Yeah. Right. So while Michelle was up the street, cause they lived like a half mile from us. Okay. So I can't imagine if it were another state or somewhere going through this year long process. But while she's up there digging through things and coming home at night and we're talking about it, I got to thinking, I said, Oh my God, if something happened to me and Michelle are kids at the time, her all, some stone high school, some just in college wouldn't have a clue. Right. You know, we had a business, we had employees, they wouldn't know who our attorneys were. They wouldn't know where to locate a will. They wouldn't know what group life insurance was or even to think about asking about it. And so I actually wrote the my life and wishes organizer , uh , iPad actually with a Notability app. And I just started writing and writing everything I could think of that someone would need to know if I wasn't here tomorrow, you know , and we self published on Amazon and we're going to just give it to all of our financial service clients. And they started asking us, we want to buy a copy for every one of our employees. So I was like, Whoa, okay. So going through the process, we had to keep changing and updating that organizer. And it's like, this is crazy because it's only as good as what's written down at the moment. It's hard to update it, change it. And so we decided to make this a digital product. Yeah. And then you've got the ability to go in and, and make changes. So it's kind of a dynamic product that changes as, as the times change, right. Things like , uh, excuse me, your , uh , your web logins. Okay . Some require us to update and change our passwords every 90 days. You know, you can go right in and do it on the fly. Everything is current. Um, you can share an account with a spouse or a partner. You can have authorized users, which would be a responsible adult child, might be your attorney or someone so that someone else has access. When that time comes to , we had to get the information, right.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. And this is something ultimately everybody's going to have to have to think about. It's, I kind of alluded to it at the beginning, but it's, it is uncomfortable, right? People don't want to be planning this. This is something. So as you know, I'm an attorney, we don't do any estate planning, but I do talk to estate planning attorneys and I've always been kind of baffled as to how they get clients, you know, because it's like they have to sit somebody down and say, Hey, you're going to , you're going to drop dead someday . And we got to figure this stuff out and think through it. And I'm like, and maybe it's just a personal thing, I just don't like even thinking about that. Right. It's just one of those things that's, you know, well I'll get, I'll get around to it. You know, I'll do it in 20 years when that comes closer and I just haven't really thought through it. So how, how, how was that conversation with people? I mean, how, how are you communicating with people to tell them how important this is?

Speaker 3:

You know, it's interesting because we did a survey a couple of years ago, national of just baby boomers. So you know, people who are about 55 to 72 I think at this point. So about if they were planned or prepared. And what was shocking was that less than 40% of people had done any kind of end of life planning. Yeah. And I didn't get real super deep with that question because I think for a lot of people that just meant they were like, Hey, I have a will . Right? So here's the thing, we plan, right? We're planners, we plan for everything. Yeah . We plan to go to college, we plan our wedding, we want to make sure everything is just perfect so that it's easy when it all happens. I mean, hell , I'm already making a plan for after we're done chatting because I've got a couple of errands drawn. I get to decide if Scottsdale road is going to be better or if I'm going to run back out to the one-on-one. Right, right. Yeah. But you know what, the one thing we don't plan for is the one thing that's absolutely gonna happen. Right? And so what I say to people is, what do you want the experience to be like for your family after you're gone? Because there's some normal emotions and not so normal emotions. Right. Normal would be sadness and grave . Cool. Can't change that. That's part of the healing process. We want that. But anger, stress, frustration, confusion, which leads to an enormous amount of time, money, those kinds of things. Those are all avoidable. If we only prepare, it's like an ultimate gift you can give your family. So it's like I don't want, if I don't make it home tonight, I don't. My kid is saying, man, dad was an asshole. Right. You know, we've got to sort through all this kinds of stuff and you know, so many families end up getting divided.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. When these things occur. Yeah. And that stuff gets really messy really quickly. Especially if you and I , and I think that's kind of the, you know, it's , it's, there is a lot of overlap but I think what, you know, what a state planners do and things they, I would imagine that they actually probably really enjoy your service cause it's kind of like a document service that they can use.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. We actually partner with a lot of estate planning attorneys that actually provide this as a value added to their clients. So that, you know, because so often at the end, this state planning attorney after someone dies is so wrapped up with the family trying to figure everything out. But if someone had just spelled it out clearly and concisely, you know, an intuitive, easy to use platform, it makes things so much easier.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. So what , what is the, what is the click here when I die? So you've got a book up on it and I know that you said that kind of with the press of a button, a lot of these issues are addressed, right ? So what, what, what is actually happening there? So people upload their documents, somebody unfortunately passes, right. And take it from there. So,

Speaker 3:

so I have all my information in there. Yeah. Um, my kids right now, they don't know who our attorneys are. They don't know banks. I don't know where things are located, et cetera. So if I don't make it home, my kids literally would be at a gain access into my account. They would immediately know what my funeral wishes were , whether I want to be cremated or buried. They'd want to be able to see if I had any preferred , uh, uh, service, be it a Memorial or a religious ceremony. All the questions would be answered so that the kids don't have to say, no, dad would rather have this, you know, don't make family make those decisions for you. You know , you don't get them done. They would have access to our attorney, they would have a copy of the will and trust documents, would all be there . Copies of insurance policies, any other important documents, copies of tax returns, who the accountant is. Cause there's going to be a final tax return that has to be done because you know, we have to pay to die.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. We were talking about that before we hopped on here. That's a separate conversation. Death and taxes are death and taxes.

Speaker 3:

Um, so they would literally have access to everything. And then, you know, I always tell people, I joke, I say , you know, I read two newspapers every day and they don't show up in the driveway. They show up on my iPad. Right. So, and last , um, someone will start a business, you know, a thumb cutter business. And then , so my family can put it on my iPad, right . To open up. If they can't get in there every month, there's going to be recurring charges against credit cards until they can shut it off, which is money that they're not going to get. And when you think about all your digital identities that are out there, I mean, frankly, LinkedIn, Facebook, all your profiles, I'm tired of seeing. I have, and you probably do too. I have dozens of people that are no longer here that are still on Facebook and no one is memorialized their accounts because they didn't set up it as a legacy. Uh ,

Speaker 2:

yeah. You know, it's, it's, it's absolutely true. You know, I , I lost my little brother , um, in , uh, in 2016 and we had such a difficult time figuring all of that out. And he died completely unexpectedly. And it was, it was something that was very hard, but, but as you were speaking, I started thinking about all of the loose ends that we weren't able to tie up in his life. We did not, as you said, we could not get access to a cell phone. We could not get access to most of his online accounts. And you know, a lot of that stuff is just still kind of floating around out there, you know, which is now that I think about it a little unsettling in a way because that, because it is, it is, like you said, it's just kind of abandoned and forgotten and we couldn't, we couldn't change a lot of that stuff over , uh, to the, to the, you know, kind of the Memorial and remembrance of status that a lot of these online platforms have.

Speaker 3:

Right. And you know, most people don't know there's a legacy area within Facebook and LinkedIn that they can set up and, you know, they always figure out how to get around to it later. But as long as you have, you know, within your my life and wishes portal, you know, here's the web address, here's my username, here's my password, here's my challenge questions for those accounts and keep them up to date. You can take those things down. You know, I want to be the guy that, you know, on somebody's LinkedIn or Facebook. I go, Hey, happy birthday you up . Right, right. Yeah. What are you, what are you under a rock? You haven't communicated. Yeah . Where you been? And then I got 400 people come back at me. Hey asshole. Right , right . Is dead. Yeah. He's dead. So and, and so it just takes a little planning. And so when I ask people, it's like, all right, so why don't you do it? Cause I've not spoken to one person across this country in three years and we've told them about what we're doing. They said that'd do sucks . Everyone says, God, everybody needs that. Yeah. Right. So why don't you do it? Well, I have time. Really. I mean, this is not taxes. It's the album. It's death, right? Yeah. So yeah, I have time to do my taxes. I can wait until April 15th if I want. Right, right. Put them together real quick. Get them in the mail. I don't know what them a dime. You know, people think I've got time. It's like we're really, cause I don't have that crystal ball. Yeah. And every day , I mean, you know, living down here in the greater Phoenix area, you flip a news on every night. There's fatalities out on these roads every day. Yeah . It's not old people, right. It's young people. It's kids, young people with families, people without families . We just don't know. So make, apply . The other one I love, this is great. So I'm talking to a group of people. I had this lady and I was in the group and I was like, well, how come you haven't done these kinds of things and why don't you talk about this stuff? And she was like, it's bad luck. I was like, really? I said, you know, we talk about sex all the time. Yeah. Doesn't make us pregnant. Right, right, right. Yeah. Talking about it's not going to make his dad right. You know, it's the , uh , I don't know . It's, it's the unselfish thing to do. Right. You know, like I say about planning, okay , we plan , uh, because you know, I'm going on vacation so we'll make plan for that. I'm going to plan for my retirement, I'm going to plan for my wife's birthday, do this. I think so . We plan because that's fun. That brings us joy. We're doing it kind of for ourselves and others cause that's going to be a great experience. Being prepared and planning for your own death, hopefully a long time away. That's not for me. Yeah. That's for everybody else. It's the ultimate gift of, of love, you know, making things easier on those people after I'm no longer here. Right. Yeah. Because they're going to, and I can speak from experience,

Speaker 2:

it is a whirlwind, right? Especially if somebody goes unexpectedly, you have no time to wrap up any of those affairs or just to communicate with them about what their wishes are. And as you're, you're is , you're trying to piece all of that together. Like you were with your father in law. You're, you're also grieving. You have to be in support of the people who, who are also grieving. I mean, it , it's, it's a whirlwind. I remember when Eric died, my brother, it was, I mean, I, I don't really remember the two weeks after that happened. You know, that experience, right? It's a blur. Yeah . Just don't even remember. I don't even know what the heck we did. I don't know how we've all got it done, but you just kind of go into autopilot mode and you just do the next thing that you know how to do. But I can, I can speak from experience that it would have been a lot easier in many different ways had we just done a tiny bit of preparation for it.

Speaker 3:

Right. And you know, again, so the thing is we don't know and we think people should prepare. You know, I , uh, I started a couple of years ago thrown around a term death etiquette. I liked that. And um, and I was talking to , uh , a friend who's an attorney. He's like, dude, you trademark then . Yeah . So I did good for you. Um, and so, and, and cause my memories, you know , I'm getting old, so I wrote this down. So I want to , this is what death etiquette is. Yeah, go ahead . It's being thoughtfully prepared for one's own passing, making things easier for family and loved ones by leaving clear and concise instructions in regard to your final wishes for funeral desires as well as location and access to all important documents and accounts. Further identifying who should be responsible for carrying out those final wages and ultimately settling all the final fairs . It's a simple act which saved loved ones, stress, time and money, which are the things that divide families. Yeah,

Speaker 2:

it's brilliant and it's beautiful and it's a very, it's a very succinct way to kind of crystallize everything that you're doing. You know that death etiquette, it is, it is rude if you don't, if you don't help your family wrap up your affairs at the end of the day.

Speaker 3:

Right. You know, selfish much. Yeah . You know, it's like, so again, as planners we all plan for why not plan for the one thing that absolutely will happen. Right. You know, since it's happened, you know, so going through that whole process and then realizing I don't want my kids to have to go through that kind of a process. My mission is to help 1 million families avoid the shit storm that's going to happen. It will happen at some point. People just don't know they have this problem yet. So, you know, biggest challenge. Right, right.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. It's, I think it's brilliant. I think it's absolutely necessary and it seems like, you know, I think a lot there , there may be some holdovers from kind of a bygone era. You know, maybe 30 years ago there was this idea that all you needed was a will or the world was less sort of, people were less intwined into this web of services that weaves all over the place. Like we would talk to the social media companies and the different bank accounts and you know, everything that, I mean I have a password manager that I use because of all the different passwords that I have and you know, some websites, you know, want a upper case, lower case, special symbols and some don't and some whatever. So I, and I looked through that and I have hundreds, literally hundreds of passwords for all of the different services. 30 years ago there weren't any of those services. You had a bank, you had , uh , you know, your, your utility bills and you had your, your attorney who probably handled your will and you know, all of that stuff and that's all you needed. So maybe 30 years ago was a lot easier. But today it's like a minefield. It's just, it's, it's amazing to go through and so, and so this service people are , people are going in there and they're , and they're listing out all those kinds of essential assets.

Speaker 3:

Right. And it's not like, you know, cause someone says, well can I just do all that and you know, on, you know , Google drive or something. Well yeah, you can if you know all the things that you want to do, but conversely, our program kind of walks you through, it asks you the questions. All right . The URL, this list your challenge questions, you know, link it to the banks and you know, yeah , totally connect everything. So , um , my 88 don't listen mom . Yeah . So she's not 88, she's 83. My 83 year old mother. Yes . Uses it. So if she can use technology, yeah , sorry mom. Anybody can. Right . Right. And the thing about your password manager is, you're right, I , I'm the same. I use a LastPass, but at the end of day, someone's going to have to have access to that, right. To get all your stuff, get everything else . And you're right, because 30 years ago, I grew up in the sixties and seventies. Diane was pretty simple back then. Well, I guess it's still simple today, but , um , the aftermath was because, you know, any bill or obligation a person had was gonna show up in that mailbox. Do you know the steel thing out front of the house? Right? Yeah . Um, and the only thing that arrives in my steel thing out from the house is pizza, flyers. And once a year, a birthday card from my mother there , there's no other bills that go there. Um, there was, you had one bank and it was probably up the street as ours was. Right. It was easy to find out who the attorney, cause there's only one or two in town, right. You know, and all the documents and papers and everything were in, you know, the desk drawer at the house. So you could find it. And here's the scary thing too, is a lot of people say, well, why don't I just put all that in a safe deposit box in the United States? Less than 5% of people who have a bank account have a safe deposit box. Yeah, I believe it. Yeah. I don't have one. So that means all the important things are somewhere that someone's going to have a dig through, which are going to take a long time, but they're also at risk of damage to fire floods. If you live in hurricane prone areas. Yeah. Uh , California is going to be a wildfire. It's going to take it if that doesn't the mudslide after will . Right. Um, so make digital copies of all your important things, protecting them for you now. Yeah . And for your family later .

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Yeah. You know, as you were speaking, I was thinking about how, how, you know , people organize their lives very differently from each other. You know, the way I organize my email and my documents and my passwords is going to be different than the way you do it and so on. And this is something that I think as you were speaking, you know , I don't have any kids. I do have, I do have, you know, parents and family and whatnot, but I do have a business partner who we've got a lot invested in each other. Right. If Ryan doesn't lay as you , you kindly put it, make it home. I would say if he doesn't get hit by a bus or something, right then we're , we're in a, in a quandary because he's got access to a lot of stuff. I don't know how to organize it. I don't know how to access it. We've set up kind of a separate system for that internally, but, but the idea that you've got one sort of clearing house to, to capture all this material is extremely useful even for , for that application. I would imagine that's , that's also um, uh , applicable. And then what's great about to kind of title and together is you have, it sounds like an onboarding system for people to, to get acclimated to what you're requesting, what's needed. Because people don't know what they don't know. They don't know what is missing, where the gaps are. And you've already basically solved that,

Speaker 3:

right? As soon as they sign up the , we email them a link to the getting started guide, which tells them these are things you think to think about first. And here's the biggest thing. What I th what a lot of people say is this. They'll go, wow, you know, I go in and yeah, there's just so much information and they get overwhelmed and they're like, why ? Yeah , I can't get this done next week. What's like, well, no kidding, but here's the thing, because it took me 58 years to accumulate all the shit that I've gotten. I'm not going to to get it all put together in a week. Right? But what I tell people is look at it like a weight loss strategy. Okay, so you want to lose 20 pounds. So you go hire a personal trainer and he says, John, you're going to wake up tomorrow morning, 20 pounds lighter. Ah , I better run. Right? Cause that's going to be really bad. Um, but what a real personal trainer would do is say, give me 90 days, 12 weeks. What we're going to do is a little bit each week and slowly progress at the end of 90 days you will wake up 20 pounds lighter or whatever your goal happens to be. So I tell people, don't get overwhelmed, do a little bit at a time, you know, maybe once a week you go in for 30 minutes an hour or you think of something, go in, put it in little bit at a time over the course of the next 30 40 days or so, it'll be complete. Just do it. Yeah. Yeah. It, stuff like that can be certainly overwhelming, but if you, if you kind of drip the requirements, you know , you just kind of constantly kind of ping people to log in and add your stuff. Then after that 90 days comes by, you're done and you've got everything listed there. Right . And keeping it up to date, excuse me, is really simple. Um, so you know , you mentioned that you and Ryan, you know, with business stuff, right? So, obviously Michelle is my partner in business. Um, so we have our account, which is, you know, all of our personal stuff, but we also have a shared tabs within it, which has all of our business stuff, all the logins. So you know, if, you know, it is a great for her, cause she'll be at the office lot of times and she can't remember my password to log into the Sirius satellite radio to turn the music on. And so she simply goes in and can do that. But a lot of the business , uh , accounts and things that we have where we have changed passwords. So every time you change a password, then you just open up my life and wishes account, change it in there. Everything's current, they're going to go. And no matter where I am on the planet, as long as I have a smartphone , yeah, I can access my information. Yeah. And so in order to do that, so you get, what about security? So how do people, how do people access it? Do you give certain people the password or what's, what's the, what's the process when somebody does pass? What happens is , um , you have , uh , an authorized user, most people will establish an authorized user, which will be, you know, an adult child or something or a trusted person , um, who can go in and access it. Um, those people usually don't ever go in to the account , uh, before that happens because, so if, if one of my children went to log into our account and they click , you know, signing in this account, it'll open up a window, which says, you're about ready to access your dad's account. Are you sure you wish to proceed? He will be notified. Yeah. Alright . Give him the opportunity to say, oops , Nope, not going to do it. So that's the way most people do it. The other , uh , way that people do it is we provide a fulfillment kit direct in the real mail to someone after they subscribe and we give them a discount card to give the family and friends. But we also have a kind of an end of life card where they can put in their login credentials on it, put it in the envelope, seal it, and it's , um, you know, has the my life wish logo on it. And it's like, you know, in the event of my death. And so my girls don't like to talk about the fact that, you know, someday dad's going to die. Right. Right. So they know in my desk drawer at the office, under the pen thing, and in my dresser drawer at home, under my socks, there's an envelope. Something happens to me. Open the envelope. You'll have everything you need to know. Yeah . As far as security, military grade a S two 56 encryption, every user has their own encryption key, which is the equivalent of 617 digits. So even though Michelle and I share an account when she comes in, or I come in completely different pipe, okay. So if someone were able to, u h, hack a 16, 617 digit key, good luck. They access one account, not all of them. Yeah. So then we, u h, strongly encourage, u h, you know, we've got very unique password protocols, u m, as well as we strongly encourage everyone to turn on the two factor authentication.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. And that means that when they log in, they have to also authorize it somewhere else, right. On their phone or,

Speaker 3:

correct. So what , uh , what we do is they can either have a , a text message sent or an email sent to them so when they're logging in, and so I enter my typical , uh, username , my password, and then it'll pop up with a box. I have to enter six digits and then I get a text message on my phone immediately enter six digits and I'm in the ultimate protection because if someone does actually get your username and password, there's no not going to be to get in.

Speaker 2:

Right, right. Cause then it would go to your phone and then you'd have to authorize it. Right. Yeah. Have you, I know it's kind of an off the wall question, but what has her, has there been situation with, with your , uh, your platform here where somebody doesn't, there's an inability to get access to it? I'm just curious. Um, no,

Speaker 3:

from a service, had no complaints saying, you know, can't get in. Um, that at one time we had , uh , an individual trying to get their co owner to, to access and yeah, it wouldn't work. And after a customer service dug into it, her spouse , um, didn't actually accept the invitation within like a 30 day period of time and then it expired. So

Speaker 2:

yeah, we just reset it for him . Yeah. I was just thinking like, if, you know, if, if the father gives access to the son and they're both in a car accident and they're both killed, what is the sister do, who wasn't in the car, who didn't have access to it? You know, kind of one of those situations.

Speaker 3:

Right. We're adding in , uh , an actual , uh, legacy , uh, protocol, which, you know , really is kind of unneeded because you can have more than one authorized user. You can put multiple people. Um , but we're adding that in so that , um , if that person that's listed provides the death certificate to our company, we can send them an unlock code for that. Yeah. Uh , we're also , uh , from a security standpoint , uh, which I think is important to note. We're a zero knowledge company. So what zero knowledge means is that no one can see anything that a person has put into their account. The only thing we have access to is obviously , uh, the username, their email address in their , uh , physical address so that we can communicate with them.

Speaker 2:

So that means that people who are in customer service employees, people who are working for your company are not able to go in and see stuff,

Speaker 3:

right? Everything , uh , is encrypted when it's uploaded, encrypted at rest and encrypted when downloaded. So the only thing we can see , uh, within the platform is if people have completed information in various sections, but it's all encrypted, it cannot be seen.

Speaker 2:

What T talk to me a little bit more about some of the practicalities. So how do people sign up? What does it cost? How long is it, the 90 days until they should be, you know, mostly onboarded onto the platform. Where do they find it, those types of things. Okay. Well , uh, the easiest thing to do is go to [inaudible]

Speaker 3:

www my life and a N D wishes.com. Um, there's plenty of information. Our , our , we have well over a hundred and some blog posts in there , uh , good information for people. Um, but in the upper right hand corner of the website, there's a try it for free button. Um, we do offer a 30 day free trial , uh, for people to go in, take a look at it. Um, we encourage people to , uh, start using it right away within 30 days because if they , uh, you know, say, okay , well get around to it or so then yeah, they're not going to do it. They're not going to do it if you don't start entering information. But the one thing we have done for the faithful listeners, that's the gorilla nation. Um, we have set up , uh , our normal pricing is $79 a year. Okay. Which is inexpensive. It's extremely inexpensive. Um , because I've been told by numerous people that we should be charging three, four, five times that. Yeah . And again, my mission is to help everybody and make it affordable. And so, I mean do the math on it, you know, a cup of coffee. Yeah, yeah, yeah. A week to protect your family. But for your listeners and your supporters , um, when they go to sign in or login, there is a section that says I have an offer code and then click that button and type in ruler nation, all one word. Yeah . And that will provide them with a 20% perpetual discount , uh, on the platform, which my math not really good, but that's like $63.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, that's great. And that's an awesome gift and we thank you for that. And it's, they , they go sign up, they get the 20% off, use the code ruler nation. And um, if they don't want to buy the product right away, they'll still get the 30 day trial and then then they can start entering information. And then it sounded like you're , the kind of the onboarding was , was 90 days.

Speaker 3:

Um, you know, effectively we send out emails to people all the time with it. That's my challenge to people is get this done within 90 days. You don't have to do it next week, but you have to do a little bit each week. Right. To at least get it done. Um, you know, some people might be able to get it done, you know, in a week. I mean, if , if they don't have that much stuff and have all their passwords written down on a piece of paper somewhere and URLs and Guna , start entering it all in and then they can destroy that piece of paper that, you know, is obviously putting you at risk anyway.

Speaker 2:

Right. Yeah. And I , and I think about, you know, there , there are, I would imagine for a lot of people, there are things that they do not want their family to have access to after they, after they pass. Stuff that maybe is, is, you know, sacred and private and they don't, or too personal or kind of a , you know, something, something that's just in their past. There's a lot of reasons why people don't want people to know about things, but they can, they can add the stuff that they want people to access and leave the other stuff off. Exactly. Right. And then that gives them a little bit more comfort saying they're not going to go digging through all of those boxes in the back closet because I'm already giving them access to the things that they really need.

Speaker 3:

Right, right. Yeah. That I have a really good close personal friend say, all right, look, dude.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Well when I'm gone, you got to get this stuff. Yeah. Yeah . It's all under the bed. Just haul it out in the wheelbarrow. Just get rid of it. Yeah.

Speaker 3:

You know that the one that I'll get kind of sappy for a minute if I can. So the one thing a lot of our users do, and we're working to , uh , actually , uh , turn this into something really cool, but I always ask people, if you knew you weren't going to be here tomorrow, what would you tell your wife? What would you take is, so what our users do and I encourage them to do is write that letter [inaudible] you know, cause what I would say to my son is going to be different and I say to my daughter and other people and so I've got those written, I've got them uploaded into the account so that if something happens now they have that last message from me. Yeah. So what we're working on now, and we hope to have this out , uh, or released by the beginning of second quarter is upload those as videos. Wow. So get my smart phone out. Say, Hey guys, if you're watching this, it's probably not really great news, but right. Everything's gonna be okay. Right. Right. Leave on those personal messages. Then you just label them as, you know, I would , you know, message for Nick. Message for Mary. Yeah. That's extremely powerful. Yeah . You know, the other thing that's cool about that too is because so often, you know, like I say, you know, mom promised the China to both the girls, right ? So now you've got the fights and stuff. So, even if someone doesn't have a will, because only 40% of the United States actually has one. Um, and I'm not saying this platform constitutes a legal will, right? Cause it does not, but if family sees what I've listed out and we have a section there , special bequest things that wouldn't ordinarily be in a will anyway , it's like a , you know , who am I leaving the Rolex watch to ? Who am I giving the guns to? Who gets the jewelry? Who gets the , you put those bequests that takes the burden off. But then if there's a video from dad saying, look, what are you guys seeing here that I wrote? It's what I mean. Right, right, right.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. That's powerful. I mean, even from a legal standpoint, cause they're , you know, the courts are always I , and this is outside of my legal expertise, but they're looking to the person's intent. What, what did they want to do? They're there . You know, they try to honor those wishes. The problems come into play when there's nothing documented and they're just everybody's guessing. Right. And then you have all this hearsay daughter says, no, dad told me it was for me, son says, no, dad told me it was for me and now it's all hearsay and those two are duking it out and it's usually over, you know, money and stupid things. But that can, I mean, just think about the

Speaker 3:

additional

Speaker 2:

trauma that that can, that can just decimate a family.

Speaker 3:

There's one woman lastly that , uh, I helped us with some marketing about a year and a half ago. She said that in her family, two of the individuals haven't spoken with each other for 10 years following her death, which is like divide things, not families.

Speaker 2:

Right , right. Yeah. I have, I have a good friend of mine, he's an older guy , he's like 74. And he was telling me a story about his mom when she was in the Twilight of her life. She was, she had, you know, she had a on a state and she wanted to make him the kind of the, the, the, the caretaker of the estate. And he told her, I refuse to do it. I , because basically what you're giving me is a death sentence. All of my siblings, everybody's going to be coming to me for money and to divide all of these things. I , I want nothing to do with that because of the aggravation it's going to cause him. And so he just said, Nope. And so they, you know, they, and had had that, had they not had that conversation and , and he told his mom, you know, no, I'm not going to do that. You're going to have to go find somebody who's a , uh , a fiduciary. He's going to be outside of the family to manage that estate then then he would have , I mean, his , he , he, he basically said, yeah, my life would be ruined if I had to deal with my sisters every month asking me for money and asking me for this. And, and just, he's 100% right. I mean, that is something that can be a thorn in your side. And had mom left him that burden, it would have been a big problem that he would still be dealing with.

Speaker 3:

Oh, absolutely. Absolutely. You know, that , uh, you know, my wife still deals with that because she's still manages all the finances for her mother and there's other family members involved who, you know , uh, my mother-in-law, you know, generously hands money's out cause she doesn't understand how it kind of works. And there's a lot that , uh, she doesn't know, which means, Hey, we have to still pay your bills first. Right .

Speaker 2:

Well, so you're on your way to a million. How are you going to get there?

Speaker 3:

Oh, word of mouth. You know. Um , really it , uh, you know, when, when someone uses it and starts putting it in there , uh, there's an aha moment, which is kind of like, God, my brother should be doing this or my sister should be doing this. And so we think we're [inaudible] word of mouth, people sharing the word , um, after someone. And the good news for your , uh , listeners is, you know, they get their 20% off, but we're also in case they forget what that code was cause they can tell millions of people shout it from the rooftops as long as they come listen to your podcast. That's right . Right. Um, but then we send them a discount card and their fulfillment kit, which is a share the love to give to family members that they can also sign up. So, so that's one channel. And the other is , uh, in working with estate planning attorneys , uh, to really provide more value to their clients. So if we have any state planning attorneys listening in, just email me@johnjonatmylifeandwishes.com and , uh , I'd love to talk to you about it.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. And I, and I know many of them, so I'll happy to be happy to make some introductions. I start thinking, you know, every time you speak I start thinking of all the people in my life who absolutely should have this. Because you know, my mom, my stepdad, my brother, you know, everybody , um, I don't, I don't, I don't want to have to go dig through boxes and drawers when they go. Right. It's inevitable. So yeah, I think it's, I think it's an awesome service and I'm actually looking forward to diving into it a little bit more. Uh , so tell me about your book. It can, all of this stuff's on Amazon.

Speaker 3:

Yup . Amazon , uh , just click here when I die. Um, it's a , uh , book forum . It's a Kindle ebook . Um, check it out. It , uh, it, you know, everyone's like, Oh, click here . We're on a diet. It sounds like it's going to be pressing. No. You know, I'm a bit of a smart ass and so, you know, it , uh, I make light of all the situations and it , uh, is kind of our story and what happened. Um, it's discussions I've had with other people. Um, and the importance of , um , of just just being prepared, you know? Yeah. I mean, one section in the book, I talk about this, it's like, so any people who have young children can understand this. So you make this massive list when you go out to dinner and you leave your child with a center psych, okay , they can do this. They have to have a bath at this time, a book here, they can eat this, but they can't eat this. Right . We put all these instructions together because, Oh my God, little Susie and Tommy, you know, what's going to happen over the next hours to , you know, someone's got to understand. Right. But we don't think about the real important list, which is what you ultimately happens to us.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. I mean, I'm a big list builder. I love it. You know, we , and when you think about it, especially like from an entrepreneur's perspective, all we do is build systems and proceduralize things and have policies and job descriptions and all, you know, everything from top to bottom. But for you not to have something, some set of instructions or a catchall for the end of your life is, is kind of asinine. Um , but you, yeah , I was looking through the book. You've got a whole section, you've got a section on for babies also. Yeah . So pets are important.

Speaker 3:

I was speaking with a woman a while back. She, and I don't remember what kind of burden is maybe, you know, anyway, the bird, you know, exotic bird lifts for like 40 years. Wow. Wow . And she was like my age . Right. So, you know, full disclosure, I'm 50. Yeah . Um, it's like , Hm . And how old is that bird? No, it's like two . It's like, so you're going to outlive it? Who's gonna take care of it? Right. Have you talked to that person? They're probably not , uh , inexpensive to care for sure. Have you thought about leaving them a little bit of money or assets in order to take care of you ? Right. That big bird. So, yeah.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, there's a lot to think about, but you've , you've built a system to help people do it so that it's not so not so troubling. And I think I, you know, now that I think about actually going in , going in and doing it, it does seem kind of like alleviating kind of like lifting a burden off, knowing that the people who you'll leave behind are going to know exactly what to do and you're going to make their lives a lot easier because it is going to be hard when you pass. And to leave them with, with one less problem is just a major gift. And so let me, let me connect people with you. So we're going to help you get to that 1 million , uh, some best , the best places , a www.mylifeandwishes.com. All spelled out, facebook.com/my life and wishes again spelled out john@mylifeandwishes.com. That's J O n@mylifeandwishes.com. The book, click here when I die. If you're watching on video, I'm holding it up right now. And again, a very nice offer. A S a a very uh , great gift from John is if you sign up, you get 20% off the retail subscription price use promo code, griller nation. And uh , one final question. Can I, can you buy this as gifts for people? It's Christmas.

Speaker 3:

Um, absolutely. Um, the easiest way to do that would be to simply email me and I can create a unique codes for each , uh , uh, individual that they would want.

Speaker 2:

And then they just go and they, and they can just sign up. Absolutely. And you bought the gift for form .

Speaker 3:

Absolutely. Hey , have people do this, make a new year's resolution. Yeah , there you go. That you're going to be organized right this year. It's a new decade, right?

Speaker 2:

Yup . Get an organized John Braddock from my life and wishes. Thanks a lot for coming on. Had a great time talking to you, Rob. I really appreciate it. We'll follow along and we'll do it again. Sounds great. Thank you. Thanks, John. Yup .

Speaker 1:

The ruler nation podcast brought to you by the RNR law group, Arizona's premier criminal defense and personal injury law firm available@wwwdotrrlaw.com they'll give us a call, four eight zero four zero zero one three.