Gruler Nation Podcast

Episode #73: The Art of Story Telling through Video Production with Carly Gilleland

November 21, 2019 Robert F. Gruler Jr., Esq.
Gruler Nation Podcast
Episode #73: The Art of Story Telling through Video Production with Carly Gilleland
Chapters
Gruler Nation Podcast
Episode #73: The Art of Story Telling through Video Production with Carly Gilleland
Nov 21, 2019
Robert F. Gruler Jr., Esq.

Carly Gilleland fell in love with video production after she was introduced to film and editing at Arcadia High School (yes, here in Arizona!) Carly has always loved telling stories and after she realized the impact that media and videos can make on society she became passionate about contributing to the "media library" by producing feel- good stories.  

 

Carly grew up in Arizona and then moved to California to attend CSU Long Beach where she graduated with a degree in Film and a minor in Journalism and Marketing. Carly then moved back to Arizona and began to do freelance work for local businesses and her friends weddings. She finally launched The Good Vibe Media in 2017. The Good Vibe Media is a video production company that specializes in weddings, events, and brand videos. Carly prides herself and her team on being mostly female which provides a different perspective behind the lens and makes them stand out from other production companies.  

 

To learn more about Carly and The Good Vibe Media team visit their website at thegoodvibemedia.com or shoot them an email to inquire about your next event at hello@thegoodbivemedia.com and be sure to follow them on Facebook and IG @thegoodvibemedia 

 

Please Like, Subscribe, and Comment below! 

  

#videoproduction #stroytelling #video #media #film #editing #stories #feelgoodstories #goodvibes #vibes #TheGoodVibeMedia #weddings #events #branding #arizona #success #podcast #InspirationwithGrulerNation #inspire #gruler #inspiration #GrulerNation #GrulerNationPodcast #gnp #arizonapodcast #scottsdale #yesphx #phx  

 

The Gruler Nation Podcast is a show that focuses on conversations with interesting "Level 10" people passionate about changing the world with their work, relationships and ideas. The show is hosted by Robert Gruler, an attorney and founding partner of the R&R Law Group, a criminal defense law firm based in Scottsdale, Arizona focused on helping good people charged with crimes move forward with their lives.   

 

Interested in being on the show or have a guest recommendation? Email Robert directly at robert@rrlawaz.com or visit www.robgruler.com for more information.  

 

Show Notes Transcript

Carly Gilleland fell in love with video production after she was introduced to film and editing at Arcadia High School (yes, here in Arizona!) Carly has always loved telling stories and after she realized the impact that media and videos can make on society she became passionate about contributing to the "media library" by producing feel- good stories.  

 

Carly grew up in Arizona and then moved to California to attend CSU Long Beach where she graduated with a degree in Film and a minor in Journalism and Marketing. Carly then moved back to Arizona and began to do freelance work for local businesses and her friends weddings. She finally launched The Good Vibe Media in 2017. The Good Vibe Media is a video production company that specializes in weddings, events, and brand videos. Carly prides herself and her team on being mostly female which provides a different perspective behind the lens and makes them stand out from other production companies.  

 

To learn more about Carly and The Good Vibe Media team visit their website at thegoodvibemedia.com or shoot them an email to inquire about your next event at hello@thegoodbivemedia.com and be sure to follow them on Facebook and IG @thegoodvibemedia 

 

Please Like, Subscribe, and Comment below! 

  

#videoproduction #stroytelling #video #media #film #editing #stories #feelgoodstories #goodvibes #vibes #TheGoodVibeMedia #weddings #events #branding #arizona #success #podcast #InspirationwithGrulerNation #inspire #gruler #inspiration #GrulerNation #GrulerNationPodcast #gnp #arizonapodcast #scottsdale #yesphx #phx  

 

The Gruler Nation Podcast is a show that focuses on conversations with interesting "Level 10" people passionate about changing the world with their work, relationships and ideas. The show is hosted by Robert Gruler, an attorney and founding partner of the R&R Law Group, a criminal defense law firm based in Scottsdale, Arizona focused on helping good people charged with crimes move forward with their lives.   

 

Interested in being on the show or have a guest recommendation? Email Robert directly at robert@rrlawaz.com or visit www.robgruler.com for more information.  

 

Support the show (https://www.ericshouse.org/donate/)

Speaker 1:

This is episode 73 of the ruler nation podcast. My name is Robert ruler joined today by Carly G Carly Gilleland. Is that nailed? Is that right? On the money. I was practicing that multiple times in my head. But thanks for being here. So let me tell the audience a little bit about you. So you are the, the owner of the purveyor of the good vibe media. You do a lot of video production. You are born and raised in Arizona.

Speaker 2:

Born but moved here when I was seven. Yes. My roots are in Arkansas, so I've got all of the Southern in me, but I grew up here for the most.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, well yeah, I mean we'll, we'll count you as a native. I'm a native. There's not many of us left anymore. Everybody's kind of from someplace else. But uh, but at seven, you know, you went to high school here. Yes. Arcadia high. And then you moved to California. You went to CSU long beach. You have a degree in film and a minor in journalism and marketing, which is right up my alley. Anybody who knows a little bit about me. And what I do, they know I've got a YouTube channel and video marketing is huge. It's been massive for our law firm, which is why I'm super excited to talk to you. Yeah. So tell me a little bit about, about your journey to getting into media production. I know it's something that you're super passionate about now. There's some work that you have, uh, you have completed kind of displaying on the background here and you do a lot of, uh, weddings. You do a brand videos. Just kind of give us some background on how this all came to be

Speaker 2:

for sure. Well, I was lucky enough, I'm at Arcadia high school. They have an amazing media program. Um, so I kind of got my first exposure there. There. I actually, when I went to school there, they were doing their big um, kind of like reconstruction and um, like re building the school. So when I was there, I was kind of half and half. I was the old school in the new school, but they're part of their new school was, um, this TV studio production space that actually kind of replicates some of the news channels downtown. So needless to say, it's an amazing program. Um, and I feel fortunate that I was able to go to high school there and get influenced that way when I was a sophomore. So I think I was 15 years old. I did my first little three minute production and I did it a feature story on my sister who has special needs and I'm just kind of showing a day in a life and what it's like to live with a sister that has special needs. And the response that I got back from it was pretty powerful, um, from my peers and my teacher. Um, they, my teacher encouraged me to like submit it in a national student television network competition and it ended up winning an award for it. So I was like, Oh my gosh, this is crazy. And I think that was the moment where I realized like, video production is what I want to do. Like, I, I'm a storyteller at heart and I want to inspire people through, oops, sorry. I feel like I'm not talking to

Speaker 1:

no, you're good. You're good. You're loud and clear.

Speaker 2:

Okay. Um, but, but that moment being a, in high school, I knew this is what I wanted to do. You know, like I saw how much of an impact, um, this type of media makes on people and I want to do that. So I continued, um, through college, um, you know, and I actually invested in camera gear my sophomore year of college, um, and started doing kind of freelance work, um, for the university and things like that. Um, but yeah, that, that was really like what kicked, kick kicked things off for me for sure.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. And that's amazing. I mean, sometimes it's weird how that happens, you know, had there not been a media room or a media studio, you may have never crossed paths here.

Speaker 2:

For sure. For sure. I know, I feel very lucky. And the journalism and marketing piece of it too. Like I also love like writing. I mean, that's part of storytelling as well. Um, and marketing too. I kind of saw it all kind of blend in very well together. Even doing, um, some videos for the university. It's like seeing that, I mean when I started, I think I went to college like 10 years ago and like video YouTube was, was there and it was popular but it wasn't as like crazy as it is right now. Um, Instagram was just starting, there were definitely wasn't Instagram video, but I, I knew like I felt like, okay photo is yes it's everything but like video is up and coming and I know like this is going to be the next thing, you know. So it was funny cause in college I like would propose to small businesses stuff like you need to do video and no one really like, they're like, yeah we do. But like, you know, no one really liked took that action. But now like obviously it is, it's like video is everything, you know, so

Speaker 1:

it is everything. But a lot of businesses still don't recognize that. I don't think so. I, it's not something I talk about a lot, but I do have a, I have a coaching program to act to show other lawyers how to do video marketing. Basically the way I had it set up originally, you know, had a webcam and it was forK cam and all this stuff. So anyways, we pump out a lot of video, Marc video content for our law firm and it's been a massive for us. Like it's a, it's a super important part of our marketing. So almost probably half of our referrals come through YouTube and I'll tell other attorneys, Hey, you are missing the boat if you're not getting into video marketing. And they'll still look at it and they'll go, no, I'm too good. I'm too good for that. Do you find that, are you experiencing?

Speaker 2:

Um, well thankfully the, we are so busy right now because there are a handful of people that are catching on and that are seeing exactly what you're saying. But I do know that there are still so many people that are like really like really? But it is, I mean, being able to pump out video, it's such a great way to connect with, with your consumers. Connect with like, you know, hopefully soon to be clients. Like, um, I think it's crazy if you're not, you're not getting into video marketing

Speaker 1:

agree with it, but it's, it's sometimes difficult to convey the importance to people. Before we dive in further into that, cause I wanted, I want to take a deep dive. Let's talk about the menu of services that you provide. So weddings and what else do you do?

Speaker 2:

Okay, so our three branches are weddings, events and brand and videos. The weddings are, um, we're kind of like documentary style filmmakers. We like to shoot things very organic, raw and we like to implement that in our brand videos too. Um, which I'll get to in a second. Um, but weddings are a big chunk of the work that we do. Um, Arizona is a great place to get married at from like October through early may when the weather is like perfect, right? Um, cause we get a lot of sunshine. So that's a big part of our business. We love doing weddings. Um, events are another. I mean Phoenix is a, it's only growing and getting better and there's a lot going on in this, in the city. So we work with a lot of nonprofits and um, you know, do a lot of big events, galas, golf tournaments, all that, all that good stuff. Um, which is fun. And, um, our brand work is something that I'm Uber passionate about cause I love working with people that are crazy passionate about what they do. I love, um, telling their story and getting their brand and their mission statement out there to the people. Um, that's something that I'm really trying to be more focused on and build on in our business. Um, yeah, it's like

Speaker 1:

how does that, how does that creative process with you work? So when you're, when you're meeting with the small business owner or a big business owner or a nonprofit and they have this concept in their head that, you know, I probably should be doing video. It's probably a good thing now. And I've heard other people have success with it. So I'm reaching out to Carly. Where does it go from there?

Speaker 2:

Yes. So the first is a consultation where I really get to know, um, the person behind the business and the brand. Um, from there, we, a lot of times, actually a lot of our clients have ideas and they have these visions because they know like their mission statement more than anybody else. They know like their message. And, um, if they don't actually, I'll put a little plug. There's a book called building your StoryBrand. Have you heard of it? By Donald Miller. Okay. Definitely check it out because it is like, it's pretty simple and basic, but it's such a good read and anybody that is like building our business or a brand building a StoryBrand, it's by Donald Miller. Um, that's going to help. Like really it's going to help you with your messaging of what your brand is and really connecting with your con, the right consumer, you know?

Speaker 2:

Yeah. So from there we, um, we work on kind of a storyboard and brainstorm ideas of like, what is, what is your message and how do you want to get it across? Um, again, a lot of the times our clients really have a good vision of that, which is cool cause we really get to digest that and um, work on building that storyboard of like, okay, what visuals, you know, what are, what are the techniques that we're going to use to really like help tell this story. Um, and then from there we scheduled the filming and work on the editing and that the editing is so cool. I mean all of it's so great and I love every bit of it, but I mean obviously filming is so awesome because we get to work on, you know, putting together all the creative shots. Um, and then, but the editing is really like the puzzle piecing together of, you know, telling that story and finding music and all the, all the good stuff. The editing is, yeah, the editing is key though. You know, I think that you could have really, really good footage and really good content, but if you can't like piece it together and your edit, um, you know, it could make or break your video. Um, so we really do take pride in. And you know, our editing techniques and you know how we can piece together stories that way.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. Well tell me a little bit more about your team. So your team, my understanding is it's almost all [inaudible]

Speaker 2:

all female. Yeah. So, um, I have, well, right now I have three videographers, two of them edit for me as well. Um, and they're all female, which I think is really cool because we, even when I was in film school in California, it's like all of my classes were all male, which is, I mean, that's not a problem, but like there is, I, I feel like now, especially because there's so much of a demand for video, having a female perspective behind the lens is a little bit different. Um, and I think that, I think it translates differently, um, too. So yeah, it's kinda, it's kinda cool. I feel very proud that, yeah,

Speaker 1:

it is. Yeah. It is something to be proud of. And it does distinguish you a bit from a lot of, a lot of the others because a lot of the others are, are male. And you know, prior to meeting with you, I had not actually thought about that and I was wondering, I was wondering why do you think that is? Why do you think that there is this sort of male, it's kind of male dominated in a lot of ways, even though it's kind of more artistic, which I think traditionally is more feminine. So I didn't know if it was, you know, too techie, maybe. Maybe like the, the camera, I mean the camera gear and I'm super amateur, super novice. But when I go through all the settings on the camera, I'm like, what am I looking at? Yeah. I mean it's really like a foreign language.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it is. I mean, a super techie and I think that, um, yeah, that I think that in high school and stuff, when it wasn't really wasn't as popular to be like into the cameras and stuff, like it was a little, I don't know, you just didn't really find a lot of girls that were like, Oh yeah, like teach me about all this tech nerdy stuff and all this cameras. Yeah, exactly. Um, but I think, yeah, so that for sure, I think, um, as a component, but again, just going back to like telling of a story, it's like, yeah, all that techie stuff comes into play, but it's like having a female perspective behind the lens to, um, to tell the is is, I don't know. I think there's something different to that. And another thing too is like when, when you're onset or when you're working with a client and you're behind the camera and it's, it's so awkward, you know, being in front of a camera, like it's not natural. So, um, I think all, all of our videographers on our team, we were people, people, you know, like we, we like to connect and make a very relaxed environment. So that way, you know, it just, I don't know.

Speaker 1:

Well, you want people to come out of their shells a little bit. And it's a difficult thing to do when you have that big lens and you've got the red light kind of in your face and people just clam up. I mean even other lawyers, you know, we would have, we would have our attorneys, I wanted them to do videos and they, these people are used to speaking. That's their job is to talk and then you flip that light on and everything just goes quiet. And so you've got to deal with that on a daily basis.

Speaker 2:

Totally. Because it is important, like especially with your business and brand, it is important too to show your face and, and to have your clients and your consumers connect with you that way. Um, as uncomfortable as it is. But we try to bring that light approach, you know, at every shoot that we do to just kind of, yeah, crack the shell a little bit.

Speaker 1:

Do you work with, with companies or people or businesses to kind of figure out where video fits into their overall strategy? Is that part of what you do? Because some people, I think the problem with a lot of marketing is that people do marketing or videos just to just to do them just because other people are doing them. But it may not make sense for them or, or what they think is good for them may not actually be good for them. Do you, how do you, how do you have that conversation with,

Speaker 2:

uh, you know, that's a good question. I, we don't do a lot of advising. I feel like most of our clients really have that vision. They've like consulted with other either creative agencies or things like that where they're like, okay, we're going to use these platforms. This is like the most beneficial, um, you know, Avenue for us, us to go on. Um, but that's a good question. We don't do a lot of consulting that way. We really just, you know, produce the content.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. You're, you're producing it. So they come to you with an idea and you're saying, cool, we're going to make this a reality. Yeah. Yeah. Cause it's, it's a, it's an interesting thing cause there are, there are companies out there that will charge you 10 to 20 grand for a brand video. And sometimes I'll wonder why. And I, I know a lot of people, professionals who will pay for that and I'm asking them, I'm wondering what is your goal with that? Like do you just want a nice looking movie trailer? Are you trying to convert more prospective buyers? Are you, is it just a sheer branding thing or are you going to pump that around on social media? Like there's a lot that, that you can consider.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, for sure. And I think having that really professional, clean brand video is good, but it is important too. I mean, just like your, you do a great job like with the podcast and everything is having more of that content generated. Um, and, and um, I do think it's important to utilize video in a way that's like not so clean and you know, it's like it's very raw and because I think that's, that's the strongest like marketing tool right now especially is like connecting with your audience in a very authentic way. I mean that's like in life in general, like you want to have like authentic communication with people cause that's where you connect with them the most, you know? So I think that translates in video too.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I completely agree with that. It's kind of one of those things. I joke a lot about it that other lawyers will do their videos and I keep bringing up lawyers cause that's all I know. But they'll do their videos like standing in front of a bookshelf full of legal books and it's like a 32nd video. Hi I'm John, I do great criminal work. I'm the best lawyer call me. And, and people are just so tired of that. They see the same stuff over and over.

Speaker 2:

There is a time for that. But things are shifting for sure. And we have the platforms too. Like I mean, why not utilize on these platforms that are there for us to use, you know, to connect with our audience in a way that is, you know, so raw and you know, authentic that way.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. Where do you get your inspiration from?

Speaker 2:

Oh my gosh. Um, wow. I, well I think I, um, so many places I do a lot of, I mean I think also following people on Instagram, like other creatives, like that's where I get my inspiration for different techniques and like, Oh God, that's awesome. Like, um, you know, I, I tell this to the girls too, it's like sometimes you don't really have to like reinvent the wheel. Like you can get inspired by other creatives and like rework it in your own way. I feel. Um, so that's a big source of inspiration. Um, where else? I mean honestly, like the two videographers I have now that inspire me too, cause like it's been one of the girls, she started working with me four years ago and she didn't know anything about video, but she knew that she wanted to learn and to see her progression. I mean she's way better than I am editing now, four years later I'm just like Holy cow. But yeah, I get, I get a lot of inspiration through like Instagram accounts that I follow other creatives. Um, yeah, on the technical side that way.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, it's a, it's an interesting space. The videography and basically all of the media in general because there is, there is so much out there. I mean, so I, and I just mean in terms of the styles, but in terms of the equipment, you know, I'm in this phase right now where I'm constantly like, should I buy that? Yeah, sure. I'll buy it and buy it now. I'm still learning how to do it and I'm learning the functionalities. And so you kind of have that shiny object syndrome where you always go, Oh, I like that lens, that whatever that they took that picture with. And you know, how much does that cost? Oh it's $600. Maybe always, but it can start

Speaker 3:

to add up. So I guess you know, my, my, my question kind of, I was just curious as to how you sort of, you know, you always want to be cutting edge, you always want the best, but then you also gotta you know, be very good at what you're at at what you, you use your only, your equipment's only as good as you can be. Right? So you kind of have a balancing act.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Which I feel like I do. I remember like, you know, eight ish years ago when I was investing in all this camera gear and really trying to figure out like what my style was. Um, yeah, it is a lot of like, Oh, maybe I'll try this lens or are we gonna have that lens? And I wish I would have known about like renting camera gear before investing it. Cause you can easily do that Tim B camera. I still will rent some gear, you know, if there's a particular shoot where I'm like, Ooh, I want to try something different. Like just go rent it for the day and see if you like it and then you can make the investment. But I think to your point, it's like for the last like four or five years I've, I've like got the gear down, but now it's in a sense of like, okay, how am I going to use it? Like how can I use it differently? Um, change the settings a little bit differently. Or um, you know, angles are really editing techniques. What can I do to like bring in some different flare? Um, that way. So yeah, it's cool. It's a never ending learning journey.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, it is. And especially once you start subscribing to the other people who were doing it and you watch their techniques and then you have, you know, what's really cool about it now nowadays is that you can get a lot of awesome templates for things like for the, you know, for the, like the fly in logos. And all of that stuff, like you can really do a pretty decent job. Um, kind of, kind of making your vision come to life without a ton of, you're not recreating the wheel in a lot of situations, but you also need to, you also need to know how to use the gear. I mean that's, that's a huge part of that, a huge part of what you do. Um, I wanted to ask you, so some people probably may think that they're not right for video, that they don't look good on video, they don't have anything to say on video, that their video is not going to be interesting or compelling or they don't have a story to share. How do you,

Speaker 2:

I guess, Oh my gosh, if people are in this like thought process, like again, just go get that book building a StoryBrand because like you do, like you have so many messages that you can share. And I think that that book has helped me a ton even with my business. Like it really helps you like narrow down what your messaging is. And once you, once you like put the pen to paper and start like getting all that down, then like the rest of the ideas are going to flow for how you, you know, can start producing videos for, I mean if you, if you, I mean you have to think about like why, what is your passion? Like why are you doing what you do? You know what I mean? So like starting with that, it's like, I feel like if you're, if you're passionate about something, like and you're building a business and a brand for sure. Like once you put the pen to paper, ideally should start

Speaker 3:

flowing. Does that, does that book, is it kind of like a workbook? Like it gives you some, actually brought it with me if you want to see it. I'll show what it looks like. It's, Oh, you know what camera I have? I have seen that book. Yeah. I mean now they have like people that are certified to be like StoryBrand. Yeah. So I don't know, scope it out if you've never heard about it. Honestly, it's like such a good, just like reference and template. It's just a really easy, right. It's like you can just fly through it. Yeah. Um, but it's also, this is good with, you know, really creating that your messaging for your brand and whole, but like also your messaging and just be the basics of like storyboarding with your videos too. So it's a really good resource for that and I think it's important for people to nail that stuff down.

Speaker 3:

One of the key benefits as far as, as far as I can tell about about video, is it when you create one, it's an asset that you own, right? It's not like a lot of the other marketing things that people do. If you're going to be paying for billboards, when you stop paying for the billboard, it goes away, right? It doesn't, it's not yours anymore. Same with PaperClick or sale or Facebook ads or any of those things. When when you turn off your credit card, the ad goes away. But a video is something that you can keep forever and you can put it on YouTube and so many different platforms and there's, yeah, there's so many ways that you can use it for sure. Yeah. And it just, it just keeps accumulating views and it keeps kind of maturing and it's, it's extremely powerful and it doesn't have to be perfect.

Speaker 3:

Right? Like I think about, there are so many ideas of things that I want to do with my business for sure and, and content that I even want to create for, you know, for the good vibe media. But it's so hard to just like, do it, you know, like I get caught up in like taking care of my clients and like, um, so I think being okay with just like starting and not being like afraid to, I'm like such a perfectionist, so, and a lot of people can probably relate to this. It's like you want to make sure it's perfect, like right from the very beginning. It's like it doesn't have to be just like start doing it, putting it out there and then it'll evolve just like how, yeah. Right. Well and you can find your style, at least when I was doing, I mean, cause I, we still do our own videos and they're all, they're not complicated.

Speaker 3:

They're not, it's just, you know, sit in front of a camera, talk about the law and it's done very well for us. But it took me a long time to get there myself personally. It might, the first video that I ever put on YouTube is brutal. It's bad. I'm wearing this shirt. I was like, I'm like, I'm wearing like a sailboat sale and like the, and let the, the uh, lapel mic cord is like, just totally looped out of my shirt. Like it's brutal, but it put the link to that video on this reference or not. We'll just leave that one off there. But it's good to show how you've evolved so you know, it's right. Right. And, and, and how long have you been, you see 2017 is when you officially launched it, but you've been doing it for quite a while.

Speaker 2:

For over 10 plus years. Yeah. Yeah. And your is probably evolved. Oh my gosh. [inaudible] I mean, even in like, like say the wa, so I did my very first wedding in 2012 and like looking back on, I mean, it's insane. Like I'm, it's, it's insane. It's crazy. Like how my style has evolved and technique has, has evolved, but you kind of start somewhere, you know?

Speaker 3:

Totally. How about, how about nowadays? How do you know when something's done? That was another question of mine too. Especially say you shoot this big wedding, you have, you know, I don't know how many dozens, hundreds of hours of footage, whatever. Cause you've got multiple cameras going around and, and it's this big production and now you have to kind of splice it together. Like what gets, what gets added, what gets cut out. I mean, what, what's that process?

Speaker 2:

Well, when it comes to the weddings, um, we usually we'll, we'll cut together a highlight reel for them first. So that's kind of what they get first. That's, that's like the highlights of the whole day. Um, that usually ranges like three to four minutes. Now, what we're starting to do though is because a lot of our clients want like that 30 to 62nd like Instagram teaser, we're starting to do more of those like teasers than highlights than the full film. Um, with the weddings it's pretty easy cause we kind of know like what the monumental, you know, you have the ceremony, the first load, the ceremony, all of the toast, the first dance, all of that gets pieced together and just like a, a pretty movie. But um, when it comes to like the brand videos, um, I think preproduction is so important and making sure that like again, from the beginning we have a clear idea of like what the message is, how we're going to shoot it to convey that message. So we kind of know like the vision of what the ad is going to look like when we're filming. So we shoot for the edit essentially. So when, when we go to edit, it's not like a wedding where it's like, Oh, we have all this content, how are we going to piece it together? It's like we have a really good vision of like how we're going to pieces.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. So you're not just, you're not, you're not doing what I do with my phone. I'm just capturing whatever looks good at the moment. It's a lot more purposeful.

Speaker 2:

They're, yeah, they're definitely with the brand videos for sure. Yeah. I mean, there are on occasion, like we do a lot of brand videos where we just sit down with the owner of the business or whoever it may be and do kind of a raw interview that way because we want to capture that authenticity. Um, so from there, you know, we really have to piece together what that story looks like. But I would say that's, that's like the extent of, um, you know what, we,

Speaker 3:

I don't know what you did. It's good. No, it's good. I mean, I like, I like that it's purposeful because a lot of the times, you know, I, I, I, I'll get the feel that a lot of, a lot of people will just go and they'll just start recording everything and then they'll, they'll kind of do it after the fact and they'll splice things together. But when you think through it, you can make sure you're really intentional about capturing the shots that matter and then you hit it. That stuff. Yeah. What's the, what's the vision then for the good vibe media? I mean, I know, I know 2017 it sounds like, it sounds like you're doing great. You're super busy. You're growing.

Speaker 2:

Yes. I mean, we continue to grow. Um, which is amazing. I feel very grateful and I feel very grateful to that. Like 100% of our clients have all been direct referrals and word of mouth we haven't done. Again, it's like, it's so hard to like, do the marketing side of things for your own business when you're doing so much of it for others. You know, I know it's, there are so many ideas that I have for how I want to expand, um, the good vibe media and other things that I want to do. I'm that way. But yes, it's been awesome for the future. I mean, I have ideas for like workshops and, um, how I can like teach people in a very simple way how to create content for themselves to just like we were talking about like to create, create more video content to have more of a connection with their audience and their consumers. Um, because it is, I mean, it can be very overwhelming, but once you get over the hump, it's pretty simple, you know, um, to just do basic stuff. I mean, obviously like, you know, there's some art and some technicalities where you do need to hire a videographer. Um, but yeah, I would love and I would love to teach other, you know, um, I've been coming videographers, the the business side of having a video production company, um, too. So

Speaker 3:

yeah, I imagine that's super scary for a, a somebody who's just trying to dive into it to say, all right, I've got a wedding this weekend. I've never done it before. Yeah. I mean weddings are chaos in general, but, and you only get one shot, you get one shot, that's it. And your battery doesn't work. Or the thing, you know, your microphone drops out or something. I mean like that's the stuff of nightmares.

Speaker 2:

Yup. And weddings are huge. They're very good practice for making sure that we are like on top and you know, on our a game because in the same sense, actually I had a meeting last week, um, with, she's kind of like a, a blogger, but she does a lot of baking and she wants to create a lot of content and video of her recipes and things. But I had this conversation with her too. It's very similar to shooting weddings. It's like we have to be on our a game to shoot those things once, because like if you don't, then you have to go back and redo the whole thing and dah, dah, dah. So yeah, you have to be, there's definitely the skill level of like being very present. Just another thing that you have to like practice, um, when you're on shoots and stuff too. So

Speaker 3:

yeah, you just got to get those, get those repetitions in, you know, I mean, and just, and trust your trust your skills, trust your equipment, trust that you've done this before and it's going to be great because I do it, I mean, even when I'm sitting here, I'm like, did I press record on that? You know, I'm still wondering, like I'm always wondering about it. There's a lot on the checklist for sure. That is, yeah, I'm sure. And now especially, right, it will, especially with you and you've got multiple people and you've got a lot to juggle and you know, you miss one of those moments and that's a, that's a very upset person. Yeah. So, so, yeah, so don't do that. Don't do that. All right. Well, fantastic. So where can people connect with you? Where can they check out some of your work? How do they get in touch?

Speaker 2:

Yes, so our website is the good vibe, media.com. Um, you can email us directly at hello at the good vibe, media.com and we're also on Instagram and Facebook at the good vibe media. We try to post a lot of our work there. Um, and a lot of behind the scenes stuff too so people can really see as an action and how we work. Um,

Speaker 3:

and then, and then if they did want to work with you, if they like what they heard or they like what they see when they check you out, how does that, how does that process work? I know you're busy. Are you, are you accepting clients? What's the, what's the turnaround time? The scheduling time? How does that all work?

Speaker 2:

So just shoot, shoot us an email and then we can start talking from there. Um, again, I usually like to have a phone call or some kind of consultation to get an idea of what the vision is. From there we'll send you a proposal, draft up a proposal and talk about um, you know, filming and editing time afterwards. We usually book out like three to four weeks for filming. And then the turnaround for the edit just depends on the project, but it's anywhere from like two to six weeks. Awesome. Yeah.

Speaker 3:

Well, very good. So let's, let's make sure that people do connect with you so you've got the good vibe. media.com hello at the good vibe. media.com is a good email, Facebook and Instagram at the good vibe media. Carly Gilleland, it was awesome to speak with you. Thanks for taking the time. This is awesome. Yeah, it was my pleasure. We'll talk to you next time. Sounds good.

Speaker 4:

The ruler nation podcast is brought to you by the RN Dar law group, Arizona's premier criminal defense and personal injury law firm available@wwwdotrrlawaz.com or give us a call, four eight zero four zero zero one three.