Gruler Nation Podcast

Episode #71: Odeen Domingo, Co- Founder of CO+HOOTS

November 13, 2019
Gruler Nation Podcast
Episode #71: Odeen Domingo, Co- Founder of CO+HOOTS
Chapters
Gruler Nation Podcast
Episode #71: Odeen Domingo, Co- Founder of CO+HOOTS
Nov 13, 2019
Robert F. Gruler Jr., Esq.

Odeen Domingo co- founded CO+HOOTS in 2014 with his wife, Jenny Poon. CO+HOOTS is a collaboration, coworking and community space, currently ranked #4 in the nation. CO+HOOTS houses 280+ scaling entrepreneurs and small businesses and has been an integral role in creating hundreds of jobs locally. CO+HOOTS mission is to extend entrepreneurship to different sectors. 

 

CO+HOOTS has held the largest youth coding event in the nation with the most diverse attendance, the largest pro-bono event in the nation and is now helping fight for equal pay in Arizona. As a trained journalist and content writer, Odeen has led the messaging behind some of the strongest local and national brands as a freelance writer, editor and content strategist.  

 

Are you interested in learning more about CO+HOOTS? Visit their website at cohoots.com, follow them on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram @cohootsphx or reach out to Odeen personally by following him on Twitter @azc_domingo.  

 

Please Like, Subscribe, and Comment below! 

  

#cohoots #coworking #collaboration #communityspace #entrepreneurship #freelance #writer #smallbusinesses #arizona #success #podcast #InspirationwithGrulerNation #inspire #gruler #inspiration #GrulerNation #GrulerNationPodcast #gnp #arizonapodcast #scottsdale #yesphx #phx  

 

The Gruler Nation Podcast is a show that focuses on conversations with interesting "Level 10" people passionate about changing the world with their work, relationships and ideas. The show is hosted by Robert Gruler, an attorney and founding partner of the R&R Law Group, a criminal defense law firm based in Scottsdale, Arizona focused on helping good people charged with crimes move forward with their lives.   

 

Interested in being on the show or have a guest recommendation? Email Robert directly at robert@rrlawaz.com or visit www.robgruler.com for more information.  

  

 

Show Notes Transcript

Odeen Domingo co- founded CO+HOOTS in 2014 with his wife, Jenny Poon. CO+HOOTS is a collaboration, coworking and community space, currently ranked #4 in the nation. CO+HOOTS houses 280+ scaling entrepreneurs and small businesses and has been an integral role in creating hundreds of jobs locally. CO+HOOTS mission is to extend entrepreneurship to different sectors. 

 

CO+HOOTS has held the largest youth coding event in the nation with the most diverse attendance, the largest pro-bono event in the nation and is now helping fight for equal pay in Arizona. As a trained journalist and content writer, Odeen has led the messaging behind some of the strongest local and national brands as a freelance writer, editor and content strategist.  

 

Are you interested in learning more about CO+HOOTS? Visit their website at cohoots.com, follow them on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram @cohootsphx or reach out to Odeen personally by following him on Twitter @azc_domingo.  

 

Please Like, Subscribe, and Comment below! 

  

#cohoots #coworking #collaboration #communityspace #entrepreneurship #freelance #writer #smallbusinesses #arizona #success #podcast #InspirationwithGrulerNation #inspire #gruler #inspiration #GrulerNation #GrulerNationPodcast #gnp #arizonapodcast #scottsdale #yesphx #phx  

 

The Gruler Nation Podcast is a show that focuses on conversations with interesting "Level 10" people passionate about changing the world with their work, relationships and ideas. The show is hosted by Robert Gruler, an attorney and founding partner of the R&R Law Group, a criminal defense law firm based in Scottsdale, Arizona focused on helping good people charged with crimes move forward with their lives.   

 

Interested in being on the show or have a guest recommendation? Email Robert directly at robert@rrlawaz.com or visit www.robgruler.com for more information.  

  

 

Support the show (https://www.ericshouse.org/donate/)

Speaker 1:
0:00
This is episode 71 of the ruler nation podcast. My name is Robert ruler. Join the day by Odeon Domingo is a founding member of cocuten co hoots is a coworking space in Phoenix and actually throughout the United States in the world I believe. And it's ranked number four in the nation. So you're doing a lot of awesome stuff. First of all, I want to thank you for being here. Oh Dean and I want to jump into it. I mean I know we've got kind of a lot to talk about things like entrepreneurship and what you're doing to kind of give back to the community and help help the underserved communities kind of get in touch with entrepreneurism. But just let's start at the basics. Just give me kind of a, uh, the foundational framework on what cahoots is. Cause a lot of people don't know what a coworking spaces.
Speaker 2:
0:45
Yeah, for sure. First off, Robert, thank you so much for having me here. Definitely appreciate, um, your time and learning about cahoots then myself and everything else that, uh, that we're doing there for. As far as Kahoots goes, it's a, like you said, it's a coworking space. So fundamentally it's a shared office space, uh, for startups, small businesses, entrepreneurs, so long entrepreneurs. We also have a lot of freelancers, remote workers. We also have, um, satellite teams of companies where they are headquartered somewhere else. Seattle, San Francisco, um, Minneapolis. And then they want to get into the Phoenix market. And so they have their set of satellite offices at cahoots as well. Uh, so that's fundamentally what cahoots is. It's for us, it's definitely more than that. We always say that Kahoots is more than the space. We focus on, um, the culture and cultivating a community.
Speaker 2:
1:44
Uh, and what goes on with that, which is collaboration and forming a community where yes, we have our own projects, we have our own companies, we have our own things that we are doing separately, but we are all invested in each other, not necessarily financially. Um, but because entrepreneurship and whether or not you're entrepreneurial remote worker, you know, it's very lonely. It's is siloed and you know, you, you may have started out working from home or starting out in an office all by yourself and, um, you know, you can't necessarily grow professionally or personally in that way. What we found was when, you know, we cultivate that kind of culture of community and collaboration, that's where we seeing people grow, not only their companies, but just themselves where, um, you know, we have so many different people within cahoots who have, you know, so many different skills, so many different experiences, so, so much, you know, variety of, of deeper knowledge of, of different things that no matter what you need, whether it's a question about life or a question about business or, or anything else, that person's already there vetted in cahoots.
Speaker 2:
3:09
Um, and so having that kind of, I say ecosystem, yeah. Just helps people. So we're there not only to get your work done, uh, but get your work done better, um, faster, more efficiently, more effectively. Um, you're learning from other people. Um, and we have a lot of companies as well and a lot of people who hire each other on, um, or they, they collaborate with each other in certain ways or they brainstorm with each other whether or not they're on the same, you know, contractor or project together. Um, but just because you know, that person is there, you get so many different perspectives. Um, and when you're alone, you, you don't get that variety. Uh, but when you're at hoots, there's so many different people there that you can connect with. Um, that network is super important just to expand everything that, um, you know, you're doing just within your own company or your own project or anything like that.
Speaker 1:
4:11
Yeah, it's a very interesting concept. I mean, it sounds, it sounds a little bit kind of unorthodox for a lot of people. So when we started our law firm, we, you know, the first thing we did is we went and got an executive suite where we just kind of isolated ourselves away from the rest of the world. You know, got an office space, could rent some conference room time, but the culture at that first executive suite wasn't such that you could just kind of walk around or talk to other people or get to know really anybody. I mean, it's kinda fascinating. We're in this building with a lot of other people in similar positions, a lot of other startup kind of companies and kind of fledgling entrepreneurs, you know, trying to figure it out. And the culture was such that we just, we didn't know who they were. We never communicated with them. There was no, there was no coworking going on. So how, how did this culture in cahoots develop? I mean, was it kind of organic? Do you guys set the tone at the top or when you bring in a new member, how do they know how to act and behave? Because it's not, it's not I think something that a lot of people are accustomed to.
Speaker 2:
5:10
Yeah, for sure. I think, um, like anything when you set, when you have intention and you set that intention, um, and you set that expectation, um, that's kind of how you build anything from the ground up. You know, when we started cahoots, it was, you know, me and my wife, uh, two other, two other people in a 2,500 square foot warehouse, um, in downtown Phoenix, uh, and adjust us. And we knew, we knew what we wanted out of the space because we were solving the problems that we were already facing ourselves. Um, so we, we needed to solve things like a professional office space and creative and an inspirational office space where we, not only where we are, we can work, but we can, um, have clients, a client meetings and, and like I said before, collaborate with others so that we gain, you know, different perspectives and things like that.
Speaker 2:
6:09
But it's really just built out from there, from, from those four people. And we knew that we wanted to set that kind of culture. And then when you just set that expectation when someone comes in and you tell them, you know, that the stories that have happened, you know, with members through cahoots and things that have happened, uh, through crickets as far as the growth of companies or the growth of people and, and the, um, that ecosystem that, uh, pretty much serves, you know, each, each other. Um, when you tell those stories, you know, people just start, they get that, you know, when, when you set that expectation, they know what they're getting into. Um, and it's not for everybody. You know, some people want to just, you know, put, put their headphones on, put their head down, um, and, and get to work. And obviously that's, you know, what we, what we do as well.
Speaker 2:
7:04
But, um, you know, some people don't want to expand their network or, or don't want to come into a space where, um, they want to get to know other people. Um, so people self select themselves for sure. They slept select themselves and they select themselves out. Um, but when you set that intention and you set that expectation, um, you know, it, it organically and gradually, uh, grows, no matter how many people you know, start, um, becoming members at Cuzzi who started with four people on the for that first day. Now we have 250 individual members and about 150 member companies. Um, and every single one of them, uh, knows exactly what, what cahoots is about.
Speaker 1:
7:52
That's fascinating. So, and then you founded this in 2014 co founded it,
Speaker 2:
7:56
uh, to that actually 2010, um, was when we, when we started. Cool.
Speaker 1:
8:01
Okay. And then the, the co hoots foundation, which we also wanted to talk about, that was later in 2014 so are you finding that a lot of the members, so you have, I mean, it's a lot of members and are they, how does that work? So when you're a member of cahoots, practically, what is a person getting? Are they renting? You know, cause it's not their, they're not renting a I specific office like, right. Like they would in a Regis or, or, or an executive suite or something like that. Can you kind of just give us a structure for, to flush out how it works? If you sign up and you're going to go be a member of cahoots practically, what does that look like for somebody? Yeah,
Speaker 2:
8:34
sure. We do have, um, since we moved into a larger building, we have a 14,000 square feet in Midtown Phoenix. We moved into that in 2016 we do have separate office spaces for bigger teams. Um, but we do have membership tiers. So I'll go, I guess from the bottom up. Okay. I have a, what we call a flex membership. Uh, that someone who, you know, just needs a place to at least fundamentally just needs a place to, to go to work Monday through Friday, you know, nine to six doesn't need 24, seven access or their own office. But once a creative inspirational place where they can get work done, expand our network and everything else, um, and that starts at $99 a month. So they could just come in anytime we're open. Um, they could come in and out. There's no like restriction on how many times they can come.
Speaker 2:
9:24
Um, as long as we're open, they can come. Um, and we have a lot of flex workspace, um, areas within our building where they can kind of just, you know, first sit, first, first work for Stanford's work as well, like calling it. And then above that is what we call our nest membership. And that's someone who has her own desk, that's like a dedicated desk membership where, you know, that's someone who really needs their own like station. And we have a big, uh, desk open desk area where they can choose their own desk, they could bring their monitors, they could bring, you know, their files. They could, you know, make that desk their home in their office. Uh, that person gets 24, seven access. Um, they get 20 hours of, um, credits a month for conference rooms. Um, so that someone who's a, maybe maybe a little bit more established, maybe a, is working with a lot more people. Um, and then after that is our office spaces and what we call team spaces. So we have teen spaces for teams of four all the way up to 20. Um, and those spaces, obviously they get their own separate office. They're still within the community, but you know, they get their own private space, they get more office hours, obviously 24, seven access as well. Um, and that's kinda just how, uh, how it's situated.
Speaker 1:
10:45
Yeah. So a lot of different options kind of depending on what you need and that makes sense. So somebody who's meeting with a lot of potential clients or something like that, they're going to need more conference room time or even if they're processing cases and things. Where did this, where did this idea come from? Because in 20, in 2010 I would imagine this is kind of new ish, you know, kind of a novel idea that people are not really thinking through or eat it. It reminds me of, you hear that term in startup culture like incubator, you know, they, these incubators where they'll just throw a bunch of minds in a room and they'll just kind of feed off of each other's energy and come up with something great. Kind of has that type of feel to it. But in 2010, you know, I mean, I, I still, I still don't know of really any, anybody else who's doing it. I'm sure you do, but I just haven't seen it. But where did that come from? How did you develop this and decide to run with it?
Speaker 2:
11:33
Yeah, yeah. Um, it, it kind of goes back to, um, my wife and I's background, you know, she, um, is slash was a graphic designer. Uh, but at the time she was a graphic designer or an art director at the Arizona Republic. One of their magazines, or actually their whole magazine, a department there. She was the art for, I was a sports writer at the Arizona Republic, was there for a long time, for about nine years. And as if you can remember at that time, around 2008, 2009 with the recession and everything and just what has happened and it's still happening to the, uh, newspaper slash journalism industry. Um, there were a lot of layoffs. It was, it was pretty crazy slash sad, uh, to see, because, you know, when I started at Arizona, Arizona Republic in 2004, you know, R S I was in sports, so our department was huge.
Speaker 2:
12:27
We had, you know, 15 copy editors, uh, 20 writers, um, by 2009 that staff dwindled down to maybe a third. Wow. Um, so there was a lot of layoffs happening. Um, because Jenny was the art director for the magazine department. We knew that magazines weren't necessarily, um, part of, you know, their, their big plan, at least they're big plan to, to be sustainable and everything else. So we knew that sooner or later the layoffs were, were gonna happen. Um, and so Janie was like, you know, I ha, and she, Jenny had been doing a lot of freelancing. She already has had a lot of clients, um, outside of, um, her, you know, nine to five job. Um, so she decided just to start her own design and branding agency and you know, she was good at it. She already had clients and everything else. Um, her parents started, um, a restaurant back where she used from in, in Minneapolis.
Speaker 2:
13:29
And she didn't want to be an entrepreneur, but she was kind of forced into it. Um, so I obviously helped her start the design and branding agency, um, kind of living off of, you know, my salary at the Republic then, um, and working out of our home, our home. Um, and again, being siloed and everything else. We, the company was growing. Uh, but it wasn't conducive to growing a very lean, very young startup, small business where, you know, the company is growing. We were having client meetings at Starbucks even though we didn't drink coffee. Uh, we were having interns come and work out of our third bedroom off our first house. Right. Um, and it just, it, it, and also, um, because we were so alone, um, you know, we missed that factor of just being around other people, um, that we can bounce ideas off people again, that we can always, I'm always going to go back to the word collaboration because that's really where, you know, it all starts and where the heart of cahoots is.
Speaker 2:
14:37
Um, so, okay, so we, we didn't want to work out of the house anymore. Um, we try looking for office space and back then, you know, other people were doing coworking, but they weren't doing coworking in Arizona. There was probably at that time, maybe 300 coworking spaces in the U S um, and no one was doing it in Phoenix. Um, and we didn't even know what court that coworking existed. Right. We just look at trying to get off the space and obviously going out there, you know, there was Regis and, um, it, that just wasn't the place that we were really looking for. Um, it was, you know, just a small office where, uh, you know, no, it didn't seem like anyone talked to each other and it was, Oh, it wasn't just the atmosphere that we were looking for. And then then also going through traditional commercials spaces and there was no way that we could afford that.
Speaker 2:
15:34
Um, with a long lease, um, high, you know, uh, high monthly, uh, especially for, for such a small team. You know, I think Jenny called five, uh, you know, five commercial real towards, and I think three of them just hung up with after telling them, you know, what we were looking for, how much we could afford and everything else. Um, and also around that time, you know, we, uh, we were starting to learn a lot about, um, integrating ourselves into the downtown community. And because of of that we were able to be introduced and also become friends with other people that were also kind of in the same situation where we were aware, you know, that the recession hit. So we're either starting our own businesses or they had their own businesses and just didn't have a place to go. And so we're like, you know what, why don't we just pull our, own our resources together and go into a space together?
Speaker 2:
16:32
And we were just going to be this, this pseudo agency because we had other people who, um, who did things like PR. We had a PR person, we had a, um, a UX UI person. Uh, we had a software developer. It's like we could become a pseudo agency. Still have our own different companies, but go into an office space. Um, and so Janie, I kinda just took the lead on that. Um, you know, Google shared, we didn't even know what to call it. We just Googled like shared workspace and saw that, Oh, people are actually kind of doing this and they're calling it coworking even know that this concept existed. Yeah. Um, it's like, well, why don't we do that? Why don't we, uh, not just keep it to ourselves. We, you know, if we're looking for a space like this, other people are as well. Sure. Um, and so we, we kinda, we call it coworking. We are the first coworking space in, in Phoenix. Um, we, uh, you know, open it up where there's only four of us. We had a big launch party that somehow attracted 400 people. Um, and it, it kinda just, and it kind of just snowballed from there. We, I think we had six members after six months, 12 members after a year, uh, 24 members after 18 months, and then 48 after, after two years. And it kinda almost kept doubling after that.
Speaker 1:
17:51
That's great. Yeah. Yeah. So it kinda caught fire. So people who were going there really enjoyed the experience. They liked being around the other people who were there and they liked the culture and they've told people and, and it just kind of snowballed.
Speaker 2:
18:05
Yeah. Yeah. And we were just, you know, like I said before, we were kind of just helping solve you solve each other's problems. I'm like, we needed the space, so we're going to do it ourselves. And if we're feeling it and if we're a community up against these obstacles, um, other people are like these problems and these obstacles aren't new. They're just new to us. Uh, and how, how can we solve not only our own problems, but other people's as well. Um, and that's, yeah, that's kinda just kinda just how it happened. And, uh, not only that is just the, you know, the resources that we're able to provide because we have so many people with, you know, different skills and, and knowledge and experience. Um, and leveraging that, uh, for the community within cahoots as well as the greater Phoenix community. Cause we have a lot of resources that are open to the public as well. Um, and that, uh, that kind of was where the, our nonprofit was born out of, um, to be able to provide that, you know, that's just, you know, an added, uh, an added component to just our, our central mission of, of growing entrepreneurship and making sure it's accessible. Um, you know, to those who were, it may not have been accessible.
Speaker 1:
19:21
Four. Yeah. So that's the mission of co, the cahoots foundation. It's to extend entrepreneurship to different, different sectors. What, what types of activities are you guys doing? I mean, how do you do that?
Speaker 2:
19:32
Yeah, for sure. So we have, um, right now we have weekly lunch and learns where, uh, we bring in an expert on the field. Right now it's, um, they are monthly themes. So, uh, this month's theme is, um, like marketing. Um, last month's theme with sales. We also had, um, health and wellness and things like that. Uh, so we've been bringing in experts of that field. What's a, a 90 minute workshop session, very tactical where it's, um, and it's open to the public. So there you don't have to be a member, you don't have to pay anything. Um, all you have to do is show up, um, listen, learn, ask questions, uh, connect with the other people that work, that are also attending. Um, and then again, and also connect with the community within cahoots as well. Um, so that's one of the ways that, that we do that where it's just, you know, open to anybody. Um, uh, you know, super informational, uh, super tactical. Just something that you can go in, you know, take weight, you know, take what you can out of it where you can go, go home or go to your office or go wherever you work, um, you know, actually do those things. Um, so we have those, those weekly lunch and learns. We also have, um, yes. Yeah, yeah. What, I mean, obviously when holidays.
Speaker 1:
20:54
Sure. Yeah. Nothing happens. Yeah. Everybody takes anyway. Nobody wants to go anyways. But yeah, that's, I mean, that's extremely valuable. You know, a lot of that stuff, a lot of that information know you can, you can find somebody selling a lot of the same information for thousands and thousands of dollars. I mean, we go to, I do a lot of the personal development courses and stuff and I pay for a lot of it and some of it's extremely expensive and they get you into one of those Ascension ladders, you know, until you show up and they sell you something else and, and so on. So for you to be doing that sort of, sort of in a pro bono way, right, you're just saying, Hey, come, come learn. It's extremely valuable. And if the people show up and actually digest that and implement it, that's, that's a tremendous value. That's great that you're doing that.
Speaker 2:
21:35
Yeah. Yeah. The one thing, um, one of the other big things that we do at just happened last weekend is we do, um, these youth, you know what startup weekend is? No, I can talk, I'll just talk a little bit about, um, you know what we do, uh, for high school students. So we have this program called youth Changemakers. Summit happens, uh, you know, one weekend, Friday, Saturday, Sunday. But essentially we take in, um, high school, high school students, um, about 50 of them. Most of them are from title one high schools. Um, and you know, we, uh, it's a, it's a way for them to learn all kinds of things in the entrepreneurial realm, um, that will help them no matter what, no matter if they come become an entrepreneur or, um, or if they get, you know, uh, a corporate job or they can take these skills to, you know, their sports teams or to school or to family life.
Speaker 2:
22:31
So what they're learning is how to build a startup in one weekend. You know, they have to come up with the idea. They have to form their own teams. They have these, um, assign each other roles. They have to assign each other tasks. They actually have to build a startup from ground up and think about all the problems that come, you know, that are in their way. They have to solve problems. They have to think about, you know, all these different things. So they're learning, you know, critical thinking skills. They're learning leadership skills. Um, ah, on Sunday, after, you know, all the work that they've done, um, over the, you know, that weekend, uh, there's a, there's a major pitch session to, um, to a panel of, uh, local, um, you know, top business owners, um, uh, venture capitalists and things like that. Um, they don't necessarily get a investment, but we have awards and everything like that.
Speaker 2:
23:29
Uh, but when you set, you know, a professional environment like that and like in there, just going as fast and as efficiently as they can, um, in three days with obviously help from guides and mentors and things like that. But when you build those kinds of skills, um, and helping them, uh, you know, formulate that and, and just improve those skills, you know, they can take that anywhere. And so that, that is one of the things that we want do is, is not only building those skills but just exposing them to, you know, different kinds of work and exposing them to entrepreneurship and that, yes, like no matter who you are, no matter where you come from, you can do this. You don't need to, you know, you don't need to go to Stanford or you know, these have a Harvard degree, no matter, um, you know, if slash um, when you go to college, it doesn't matter where you go. It doesn't matter what high school you come from. Um, it doesn't matter if you are still in high school, like you can do this. Um, and so having, giving them that access and giving them that exposure, um, and that confidence, um, builder to, uh, to know that they are capable of that. Um, it's something that's obviously very important of, of, you know, what we do and what we want, what we want for the community.
Speaker 1:
24:47
Yeah, that's huge. I was just at an event this past weekend. It's called the genius network event and they have this annual event. It's a three day thing and it's fun. It's a room filled with entrepreneurs and a lot of these people are extremely high performers. I mean huge, you know, a hundred million dollar companies. And I definitely felt like the dumbest guy in the room, which is like, which is a good thing, right? So you know, if you want to elevate yourself, go be that guy in that room. And what was really cool, this was the first year that they did, they call it genius youth. So they had a bunch of really young people, you know, from like five to I think 17 was kind of the age limit. And they, they followed along everything that their parents were doing in the big room and they were learning all of these lessons and things.
Speaker 1:
25:28
And then they brought them on to the stage at the end of the event and they got to share their experiences with the rest of the group of three, 400 people. And I was just thinking to myself, gosh, that is so, so amazing for these young people to be given that opportunity. Because think of that confidence that, that, that you're instilling in them, that ability for them to say, yeah, I, you know, I can stand up on a stage and talk to a guy who's worth $500 million. Like it's nothing. You know what I mean? And they all did, they did a great job of that. And that just setting them up, you know, laying a foundation for success for the, literally the rest of their lives by going through that. And it sounds like that's exactly what you're doing.
Speaker 2:
26:05
Yeah. Yeah. And it's just, it's really all about, um, I like to say accessibility and exposure, right? Like, um, you know, if you have a kid who goes to a title one high school, you know, he may not have his family, you know, may not have the, the means to maybe even have technology at home or, um, or have the network that maybe, um, someone, someone else has. And if you, if you're able to, um, and I think I, I wrote it down, um, earlier for you, where the chances of being born you brilliant is equal to anybody, right. No matter where you're from, no. No matter where you were born, no matter what family you're in, the, the, the chances of, of being born with, uh, uh, the, the grit and the brilliance and the, um, and with just the, it's a mind to have great ideas like that's equal to anybody, but to actually maximize like those inherent traits, um, it's not equal, right?
Speaker 2:
27:12
Um, you know, you grew up in different circumstances. You, uh, grow up, uh, without, you know, a network that can actually help you in that you don't have access to, um, you know, the, the means or the technology or the community that can, you know, help you take a great idea from, you know, zero to 100 in, you know, less than six seconds you've bought you. Um, because you have those inherent traits of that grit and, um, uh, and that determination, you can still take something from zero to a hundred, but it's not going to take you six seconds. It, it'll take you, you know, six 60 years or six years or something like that. Right? So if we're able to help them get from zero 100 by providing those kinds of resources and exposure and accessibility, um, and to help them cut that, um, like that's, you know, that's creating, um, something that is good for pretty much anybody.
Speaker 2:
28:12
Um, and you're, you're creating economic impact, you're creating local impact, your, um, creating really generational wealth for, um, for some people who, you know, may not have been born into it. Um, so that's also obviously one of the things that we focus on in that, you know, when we look at what we really want to do in the community, uh, those are, you know, obviously besides helping people get work done, uh, that those are one of the things that, that, um, that we value. And that's, you know, part of our, our fundamental, fundamental, um, missions.
Speaker 1:
28:47
Yeah. And it's a great mission. I mean, and it's, it's woven throughout all of the things that you're doing. Obviously you have a very strong passion for entrepreneurship and, and, you know, businesses and things. Where does that come from? You know, that's not something that is, is, I think, very common. You know, people are, are interested in rescuing puppies and, you know, helping people get off drugs and, you know, providing education or equal pay or those types of things. But you don't see a lot of people who are sort of as, uh,
Speaker 2:
29:17
yeah,
Speaker 1:
29:18
focused on entrepreneurism as, as, as you are. And I think it's a great thing. I think it's something that's often overlooked. But where does that spark come from? I mean, where, you know, where your parents, entrepreneurs, did you read a book that let you up? What, you know, how did that come about?
Speaker 2:
29:32
Yeah, for sure. I could tell my personal story and then I could tell my wife story as well, which is very important too. It's, you know, what got us to where, at least God's too, you know, what are our values on our mission, um, are now, uh, but for me, my parents were not entrepreneurs. Um, but what I got from them were, was, you know, being a self-made person. Uh, or am I, I'm Filipino. I was born on Guam. Um, my parents, uh, are from the Philippines. They didn't grow up in a very, um, you know, affluent family. My dad is the oldest of nine kids. Um, my mom had, um, three other siblings, but they were, you know, if middle class, maybe lower middle class. Um, but my mom worked her way into, I don't know how she did, but, uh, she went to, she was able, after graduating high school from the Philippines, she was able to, uh, afford and work her way into a, um, a college in New York city.
Speaker 2:
30:37
Um, my dad, uh, became a draftsman at a art, like for an architecture firm. Um, and they had to work their way into it. Um, you know, they had to figure out funds and everything else on how to do that. And they, um, you know, I grew up, uh, and when I grew up I would definitely middle-class, you know, my parents really never, um, told me, you know, how much they made or anything like that. But, um, I didn't really struggle. Um, living on Guam, I, um, I was pretty comfortable. But what I learned when just hearing their stories and how they go about things and how they, you know, treated the, treat other people and have treated their family and, and how they go about things. That's kind of just where, where, uh, you know, those kinds of values were instilled in me. Um, when I was 10 years old, um, and read about the a play story.
Speaker 2:
31:34
Uh, I read about the, the first dream team that I was here. I'm a huge sports fan. Family's a huge sports family. Um, learned about the, uh, read about a book on the dream team. I was like, this is it. Like I can, um, I was a big bookworm and loved sports, loved writing. I was like, Oh, like someone wrote this book so I can, I can write about sports. Like that's the thing that I can do, um, and go on and growing up in Guam, that's just not a thing that you really think about. There's really only maybe three things you can do on Guam. You could, you be, uh, you'd go into the tourism industry. Um, you could work for the government. Um, or, or, uh, go overseas really, um, and do something else. Um, and I didn't know any sports writers. I didn't know even any sportswriters that, um, the big thing for me was I, you know, I didn't really see anyone in that industry that looked like me.
Speaker 2:
32:28
Um, and that also hit me as well because again, like, you know, I didn't have a network. I didn't have someone that I can look up to where it's like, that guy did it, that means I can do it too. I had to, I had to do it myself. I had to do, um, I do work my butt off to, um, get an internship at the LA times I add too. Um, and the orange County register and Colorado Springs and everything like that. Like no one showed me the way I had to do that myself because I saw where I wanted to go. I, I had that, um, I kind of, you know, a little bit of that grit that I've had, I've learned from, from my family. Um, I did it myself. And so that's little bit of where the passion of accessibility and exposure comes from, um, from helping other people along the way.
Speaker 2:
33:18
Cause if, if there was someone that I was able to look up to you, it's like, and if there's someone I was able to go to that would help me along the way, um, yes, going through, you know, that process was obviously, um, uh, helpful and, and everything else to you, the person I am today, but you know, it w, you know, it would have helped me at least know exactly what I needed to do instead of having to really figure it out myself and all the long hours and everything that and everything like that, you know, that stuff is still important. But if I just had something or someone or, um, a path that was laid from you or I can just go, okay, all I need to do is this, this and this, um, then I can get there and then, you know, the skills that I already inherently have, um, you know, will help me, you know, go forward or keep me where I'm at.
Speaker 2:
34:15
Um, so I think that's kinda just where, where that comes from. And then obviously doing this work with cahoots and just seeing the experiences of other people and, and um, and helping them along the way. And um, seeing our, you know, the high school students that have gone through our program and, and learning their experiences and learning, you know, what their, um, situations are like, um, you can't, you, you can't, uh, you can't help it want to want to help when, when you're empathetic, um, to, you know, everybody around you when you are able to put yourself in their shoes. Um, yeah, I dunno. You just can't, you really just can't help it. Help yourself. But wanting to, uh, to take what you know and take what you've learned and take the skills that you've been able to, um, obtain, um, to use that for, um, for other people. Um, that was a lie.
Speaker 1:
35:14
That was great. That's a great story. Yeah. And I think there's, it's spot on when you kind of can help somebody turn an idea into a reality and you see the creative juices flowing and you see their eyes light up because something's being creative. Or when you do it yourself and you say, man, this was awesome. And I took an idea that was nothing. Right before 2010 there was no [inaudible]. Now you know, there's a, there's a huge codes. You got a lot of energy, a ton of members. You've got a huge space. And that, that is really inspiring for people to say, I had this, this dream and I made it a reality. And to show other people how to do that and then to see them do it, it's very rewarding and it re very rewarding and inspirational and it kind of becomes addictive in a way, right?
Speaker 1:
36:00
You want to just keep going, all right, what else can I do? What else can I build? How else can we, you know, see these things unfold and help somebody else through it. Because like you said, when you're in a position where you're starting from scratch, I'm sure you could've, you could've saved yourself a lot of hardship, a lot of heartache, a lot of stress and anxiety. If you would've had a mentor who said, all right, look, I've already walked this road ahead of you. What you're doing here is not going to be fruitful. Probably not a good idea. Let's focus your efforts over here and you could've gotten there a little bit faster. Now, like you said, what you went through is not necessarily a bad thing. There's, there's a lot of value in trudging through it and and developing into the man that you are today.
Speaker 1:
36:38
But if somebody can can kind of help speed up that process a little bit. There's nothing wrong with, with accepting that guidance and now you're in a position where you're leading this enterprise and you're helping, you know that you're giving other people a forum to connect and really, really kind of incubate and explode their ideas and turn it from that idea into a reality. Are you finding that people are, are, are really collaborating? I mean, I would understand, I could imagine that people would go into hoots and they would say, you know, I'm here, I'm working on this project. You know, I take off, take a break, go get a cup of coffee. They talk that, you know, somebody else's there. There's a graphic designer, there's a pay per click person. There's, you know, somebody who's doing something that they need to add that would add value. Are you finding that they're working and jumping off and doing things together?
Speaker 2:
37:24
Yeah, yeah. When we a, we kind of facilitate that collaboration in, in different ways. Um, as far as the physical space goes, we, um, we deliberately a design or a spaces so that we are able to create what I like calling like forced serendipity where yes, you, you, you, you pick a spot to work with your office desk, flex space, whatever. But you know, at some time you need to go to a conference room that sometime you need to go to kitchen at some time. You need to go to the bathroom. Um, and we put those in strategic spots around the building where you have to get up and you have to go to two different spots in the building and then from there, other people do too. And so you are able to meet someone that you may not have known before. Um, and you connect with that person, you figure out what they do and, and you know, and then you create, um, you know, a connection there.
Speaker 2:
38:16
We, um, we also have this wall, what we call the karma wall where people can write. Um, if you're, if you're throwing karma, you could write, you know, who you are, what you do, what you're good at, what you can help people with. And if you're trying, if you want to receive good karma, there's also a forum where you could write, you know, who you are and what you need help with. Um, a lot of people write that down. They can browse through it and everything else. And then there are other people who, um, maybe a little bit more proactive where, you know, they asked me or our staff or, or Jenny, my wife of, Hey, I needed designer, or I need a software developer, or Hey, I have this idea, or, you know, I just really need another, um, eye on this. Um, and then we just look at our, our, you know, at our roster of, of members and point them to the right direction and make that connection via email or make that connection, uh, in person, um, and do that.
Speaker 2:
39:09
And it's, uh, and then there are other people who were just very comfortable, um, with themselves and they just, you know, they can make connections no matter what. Um, and we ask, so we have a lot of people who, this has happened a handful of times where, you know, two or, or three individual members, you know, they, um, they found that their skills fit together. They go into projects together, eventually actually create their own companies together. Um, create one company together and then, and then graduate from our space. Um, where we have, you know, a, um, a software development team within cahoots currently who has been with us for about four years now. It started off as one person in a, at a desk and now he has an office for, for six people. Um, and he's been, he was able to kind of grow in that way because of, um, a lot of projects that, that come his way, uh, just from members of cahoots.
Speaker 2:
40:06
Um, he and another member also create a mastermind group of other members where, you know, they, uh, they met every, uh, I think second or fourth Wednesday of the month and you know, go through their, each other's problems and help solve each other's problems. And, you know, in that one to two hour block and each one of those companies are, are still in business today, um, as well as thriving and, and everything else. So, um, again, uh, you know, like I said earlier, when you kind of just set that intention and the expectation and, and you show, you show them how it's done and, or they are able to one, not only you witness it but experience it themselves. Um, and that's kind of how, how it all kinda just, uh, came to fruition and grew from there.
Speaker 1:
40:51
Yeah, it's extremely valuable. I mean, there's, there's a lot of people who pay a lot of money to do, to do that type of activity, to just get it in the same room with other entrepreneurs, other people thinking about things differently than they might think about them. Uh, because it is, it is valuable. And there's that saying that you don't know what you don't know sometimes. So sometimes just being in that environment will show you that there's a problem that you're running into or somebody else will, will shed some light on things and mean it. That type of insight is, is priceless really. I mean, you can't, you can't put a price on that. So let me, let me ask you to just, how can people connect with you in anything that you're doing? So you've got cahoots, you've the hoots foundation, you know, I'm not sure how people, I mean obviously if people want to come and check out your space, you know, there's a, there's a way for them to do that. And if they want to get involved with the foundation at all, is there other resources or their time that they can donate or the things that they can do to help you? Yeah, yeah, for sure.
Speaker 2:
41:50
As far as, uh, Coots, uh, for-profit coworking space goes, um, obviously cahoots that comp C O H O O T as in Tom, S as in sam.com. They can go through that. There's a, um, a tour form that they can sign up if they just wanted to come in and tour the space. Um, we are on a Twitter, Facebook and Instagram at a cahoots PHX. Um, for the foundation nonprofit. They could go to cahoots F D N. dot. Org. Um, there's also, there's a donate button there, there. Uh, we list our programs on our events on, on that website as well. Um, so they can, uh, that they wanted to go to a lunch and learn or if they want to just know more of what we do or more of, um, you know, what, when and where our programs are going to be held. Um, that information is on there. Um, obviously there's, you know, also contacts, um, on that, on that website as well.
Speaker 1:
42:44
That's great. Yeah. Did you know that there's a national Onpro entrepreneurs day? There's, I think there's a day for everything. This, I just learned about it, I think this past weekend. And so it's on November 15th and actually it might be, it might be good to put you in touch with a guy I knew who actually started it. He's local here also. Oh, awesome. So for the local people, where, where is it, where is your space? Where is your facility? Yeah. Yeah. Our address is two to one
Speaker 2:
43:07
East Indianola, but that's at, you know, six us second street and Indianola. The major cross street there is central in Indian schools. So here we are kind of just South of um, the Indian school park, uh, right there in Midtown Phoenix.
Speaker 1:
43:23
That's awesome. Well I love everything that you're doing. I think it's great. I think entrepreneurs, by and large, it's kind of one of those weird things where everybody, a lot of people look up to entrepreneurs. They say, well, you know, they've got this whole team of people, they're doing all these great things so they must be just so happy and just living the life when in reality it can be very lonely. I mean you are working very hard. You know, you're doing a lot and a lot of people don't, don't necessarily understand it. They don't understand, you know, when, when you have to make payroll, cause you've got 15 employees, the kind of pressure that puts on on you that, that, you know, a regular, traditional employee may not have, they're just concerned about showing up, getting their paycheck. Whereas there's somebody at the top who's got to make sure that there's enough money in the bank account to make that check work.
Speaker 1:
44:07
And so it can be very stressful. It can be very alone. And so I think what you're doing is just, it's a, it's an amazing thing. It's a gift. I think that I would really like to see more and more people dip their toe in the entrepreneur waters because I think it is extremely rewarding and you can create something that can really change the world in a lot of ways. So my hats off to you, my friend. I think it's great. Uh, so, so Odeon Domingo will cahoots com, check out cahoots feat a PHX so C O H O O T S P H X on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. All the links are going to be in the show notes and of course don't forget to go check out the facility at two to one East Indian all Avenue O D and really enjoyed talking to you. Thank you so much for coming on today. Robert. Thank you so much man. I appreciate it.
Speaker 3:
44:55
The ruler nation podcast is brought to you by the RN Dar law group, Arizona's premier criminal defense and personal injury. The law firm available@wwwdotourourlawaz.com or give us a call, four eight zero four zero zero one three.
×

Listen to this podcast on