Gruler Nation Podcast

Episode #64: God's Garden Treasures Luxury Flowers with Karin Crawford

October 28, 2019
Gruler Nation Podcast
Episode #64: God's Garden Treasures Luxury Flowers with Karin Crawford
Chapters
Gruler Nation Podcast
Episode #64: God's Garden Treasures Luxury Flowers with Karin Crawford
Oct 28, 2019
Robert F. Gruler Jr., Esq.

Karin started her floral business, God's Garden Treasures, in 2003, and has steadily grown the business, even during the downturn in 2008 and 2009. Her floral credentials include a Certificate in Floristry from Penn University, a 4 year Board Member of the Arizona State Florist Association, and being hired by clients such as Kimpton’s Palomar Hotel, Industrious, and other clients at Scottsdale Fashion Square, Southwest Airlines, SRP, Il Tocco Food, and thousands more. 

 

Karin has been won awards in various floral competitions including 2nd place at Arts and Flowers. Her Father and Grandfather were both Landscape Architects, and she is inspired by art, architecture and well-designed spaces. Karen and her team love making giving flowers easy, beautiful, inspiring and enjoyable again. Karin's distinctive design and higher level of care guarantees an exceptional experience.  

 

Learn more about Karin's floral business at their website: https://www.godsgardentreasures.com/ and follow them on Instagram @godsgardentreasures  

 

Please Like, Subscribe, and Comment below! 

 

#godsgarden #treasures #florist #floral #FlowerDeliveryScottsdale #godsgardentreasures #luxuryflowers #arizona #growth #success #podcast #InspirationthroughGrulerNation #inspire #gruler #inspiration #GrulerNation #GrulerNationPodcast #gnp #arizonapodcast #scottsdale #yesphx #phx  

 

The Gruler Nation Podcast is a show that focuses on conversations with interesting "Level 10" people passionate about changing the world with their work, relationships and ideas. The show is hosted by Robert Gruler, an attorney and founding partner of the R&R Law Group, a criminal defense law firm based in Scottsdale, Arizona focused on helping good people charged with crimes move forward with their lives.   

 

Interested in being on the show or have a guest recommendation? Email Robert directly at robert@rrlawaz.com or visit www.robgruler.com for more information.  

 

Show Notes Transcript

Karin started her floral business, God's Garden Treasures, in 2003, and has steadily grown the business, even during the downturn in 2008 and 2009. Her floral credentials include a Certificate in Floristry from Penn University, a 4 year Board Member of the Arizona State Florist Association, and being hired by clients such as Kimpton’s Palomar Hotel, Industrious, and other clients at Scottsdale Fashion Square, Southwest Airlines, SRP, Il Tocco Food, and thousands more. 

 

Karin has been won awards in various floral competitions including 2nd place at Arts and Flowers. Her Father and Grandfather were both Landscape Architects, and she is inspired by art, architecture and well-designed spaces. Karen and her team love making giving flowers easy, beautiful, inspiring and enjoyable again. Karin's distinctive design and higher level of care guarantees an exceptional experience.  

 

Learn more about Karin's floral business at their website: https://www.godsgardentreasures.com/ and follow them on Instagram @godsgardentreasures  

 

Please Like, Subscribe, and Comment below! 

 

#godsgarden #treasures #florist #floral #FlowerDeliveryScottsdale #godsgardentreasures #luxuryflowers #arizona #growth #success #podcast #InspirationthroughGrulerNation #inspire #gruler #inspiration #GrulerNation #GrulerNationPodcast #gnp #arizonapodcast #scottsdale #yesphx #phx  

 

The Gruler Nation Podcast is a show that focuses on conversations with interesting "Level 10" people passionate about changing the world with their work, relationships and ideas. The show is hosted by Robert Gruler, an attorney and founding partner of the R&R Law Group, a criminal defense law firm based in Scottsdale, Arizona focused on helping good people charged with crimes move forward with their lives.   

 

Interested in being on the show or have a guest recommendation? Email Robert directly at robert@rrlawaz.com or visit www.robgruler.com for more information.  

 

Support the show (https://www.ericshouse.org/donate/)

Speaker 1:
0:00
This is episode 64 of the ruler nation podcast. My name is Robert ruler, joined here today by Caren Crawford of God's garden treasures car. Let me tell the audience a little bit about you and then we'll dive into it. So you started your floral business in 2003 it's been growing, you've been doing very well. You've kind of mustered through the downturn in Oh eight Oh nine you've got a long history, a lot of background
Speaker 2:
0:24
in floristry. You've got your certificate of floristry for from Penn university, your for your board member or Arizona state florist association. You've done amazing work for many big names that people around the Valley and around the world would know. Places like Kimpton's industrious, you've got that. You've done work at fashion square mall, SA, Southwest airlines and so on and so on and so on. And you've been winning competitions and just growing by leaps and bounds. And that's amazing. So first of all, congratulations on your success and thanks for being here. Thank you. It's great to be here. Well, tell me a little bit about your story. So, you know, floristry floral business, that's kind of something that, you know, well maybe, maybe not. Maybe if you're a young girl, you say, I want to, you know, I want to get into the floor. I don't know. I was not a young girl, so I don't know that. But how did you get into it? Walk us through kind of how the evolution of, of your business and God's garden treasures came to be.
Speaker 3:
1:14
Yeah, so it's an interesting story. I had no idea until the early two thousands that I was going to do this. My dad is a landscape architect. My grandfather was a landscape architect and both of them have started public gardens or arboretums. And so I grew up, I'm taking walks with my dad in the woods as a family, him spouting off Latin and talking about all these plants and pointing out these exotic flowers and the little tiny ones. And so I grew up with a passion for nature and for plants and flowers. There's a story of me when I was a kid, um, two stories. One is, um, we lived in Georgia when my dad was in the army and I, there's a picture of me when I was three that has my nose in a Rose that's as big as my face that I was just enjoying it.
Speaker 3:
2:05
Huge smile on my face. Um, so I love fragrant flowers. And then there was another one and related to the whole Latin thing, but as a little, you know, you skip around and you play with words. And, um, the ginkgo tree, the Latin name is ginkgo biloba. And somehow that tickled me. So I just danced around saying ginkgo by low, by ginkgo, by low. And um, so that carried with me. And then as a child, my dad built our dream home and while we lived in a very small home on the property, while the dream home was being built, and so my playground was not so much a room in the house because we didn't have room. It was out in the forest. And so that deep nature connection has been so important to me. All my life. I worked with two nonprofits after college.
Speaker 3:
2:52
Okay. And, um, then I burned out. I just wasn't taking care of myself. You know, with a nonprofit, there's always more work. So I was burning the night oil and early and yeah. And so when I crashed and burned out, um, I spent time out in my backyard just in nature healing and visiting our family's heart, happy place in Wisconsin and things like that. So I was ask, that's where you grew up. That's where kind of the, actually West Virginia and the, my dad's roots are in Wisconsin where he grew up and so we traveled there a lot as a kid. So on the Wisconsin river playing outside in the summer, you know, all of that. So, um, when I burned out and I had in my not the second nonprofit was pretty much all work inside, you know, in a room, didn't always have windows. And so then when I was recovering, I just was reconnecting this nature connection.
Speaker 3:
3:51
So I started gardening and then grew all these flowers and herbs. And then it evolved where I was like, Oh, I think I have energy finally after two years to do something. Once a week. Um, the healing process had taken so long, so I sold flowers and herbs from my garden at the farmer's market. It was before the farmers market was a thing. So I basically made enough money to cover my gas from Mesa to cave Creek and back and um, and get, it was healing. It got me outside. It got me talking with people. I'm not really very crafty, which is kind of unusual in the floral world. Most florists are like super crafty people. But I did a few crafts, but so I had to come up with a business name and so I called it God's garden treasures. I was like, God gave us all these flowers so he should get some credit.
Speaker 3:
4:43
All this stuff came out of a garden and I have fresh flowers, but I also have these other little treasures. So that's where the name came from when I had to get a tax ID license. I know names are hard part and I love your name. I think it's beautiful. Thank you. That was before social media and um, really when the internet was just coming out. So it's a very long email address to type all the time. But I wasn't thinking about that, but, and it doesn't have the name florist in it, which still confuses some people online. They'd call me and say, are you a garden center? I see. But, um, so then the other evolution was that it was, I was involved with the farmer's market. People would ask me to do, Hey, I've got a birthday party. Can you come to my home and make some arrangements?
Speaker 3:
5:31
The organization I had been with had me do centerpieces for their 20th anniversary event. Um, so things just evolved. And then, um, I worked very briefly for a couple of other florists, um, when the, um, as it got warmer when spring and the farmer's market, you know, you don't want to be out there on a hundred degrees with fresh flowers. Right. So we, um, so I part time worked for two people and I say I'm officially unemployable. I got fired twice in six months. So I think because the, well, two things. One was, um, both florists were pretty traditional. And I, um, my dad is a Frank Lloyd Wright buff. My grandfather had met Frank Lloyd Wright and actually kept him with an honorary degree at the university of Wisconsin. And so I'm very inspired by architecture, by art, by movement, by Japanese eeky [inaudible] and it's not a great fit with a traditional florist.
Speaker 3:
6:35
So, and then, um, one of them, it was a customer service issue. The owner told me not to, um, handled problems that they wanted to handle problems, but this was before cell phones and they never answered their phone and it took them a long time to call back. So one person, one of their really good clients called me and said, we are so upset if you don't handle this, if you hand this off to one more person, we're going away forever. And I was like, okay, do I listen to the owner or do I take care of the client? Right? So I took care of the client and then a couple of weeks later I was let go. They didn't really say it, that's what it was. But it was kind of in the timeframe. So I was like, okay, I'm, I'm okay with that. That's a good reason to go out of that.
Speaker 3:
7:16
Yeah. If I had gotten fired because I handed the call off to them and they didn't respond to it, I would've felt a lot worse. You know, cause I didn't take care of the client. Yeah. And it's weird. It's weird when business owners do that, they don't empower their employees to do the right thing. Yeah. They need to micromanage stuff so well, but anyways, that's in the past. Good riddance to that, to that place and you're, and you're doing, you're doing very well, uh, with, with, without them. It's kind of funny. It's funny when, when those things happen and then it's like you've got like a mentor and a protege and then the progess breaks off and like overcomes the mentor. Yeah. You go bigger and better and you know, and more, more successful. So that's, that's a pretty neat transition for you. Yeah. And then, um, Oh no problem. No problem at all.
Speaker 3:
8:08
And turn my sound down. It happens. Not a big deal at all. That's my phone. Your cell phones, podcast host probably. OK. um, and then the other thing with the nature connection came for me where when I first started, I actually worked out in my home and a lot of the greenery I used from my yard where I had a few other friends that let me come cut things and their yard. So it was still staying really connected very quickly. I realized I couldn't grow all the flowers I needed and I couldn't get them at the timeframe I needed them. So people still ask me, Oh, do you grow flowers? And I'm like, no. My garden at home hasn't gotten much attention in the last years being a business owner. But um, but we've really pulled that into our floral design where we, uh, we love creating pieces that feel like they're pulled from nature where it's just a piece of a forest or a piece of a field and that people get to enjoy that nature, break that nature experience in their home or in their office or as a gift. And with as stressed out as our society is, we all need reasons to stop and take a moment, take a break. And I really believe flowers are a big part of that for people's lives.
Speaker 2:
9:29
Yeah, I agree. I think, I think, I think it's beautiful to have some greenery and some something organic. You know, we were in front of technology all the time. Everything is so kind of cold and sterile and industrial and you've got, you know, the stainless steel and Chrome and everything. And then, and then to bring in something else that's a little bit more organic and friendly, I think it drastically changes the environment.
Speaker 3:
9:50
It does. It does. And there's actually, um, Japanese Koreans and Scandinavians are actually have PhD degrees in studying the effect of nature on your biology and, um, heart rates lowered, you know, all kinds of stress levels. And, um, I love the Koreans. They have a thing called forest bathing where they just go like live in the forest for a week and they do yoga in the forest. So they're like, we don't have any real forest anywhere near us here in Phoenix. So, but we can have a little tiny forest and imagine,
Speaker 2:
10:27
well that's why we need your services, right? Yeah. Just deliver the forest to our office and our houses. That's right. That's right. Yeah. I was going to ask you about that because it's kind of a cultural thing right? To the Japanese and some of those other countries they giving flowers is a lot more ingrained into, into their social interaction with one another that we don't really see here. Yeah.
Speaker 3:
10:45
And I think it used to be more ingrained here and Torian times. It was a big thing. I think, um, you know, honestly, I think what I've heard from a few people recently is, gosh, I don't give flowers anymore cause it's too hard really? Because they think either. Um, well I see them all the time in the store. And so if I, you know, if I don't want to S I think I should, I, there's almost this, everybody should DIY everything feel in our culture and gosh, you know, I don't have time to go to the store and how do I pick things out that are going to go together. And then, you know, buy a vase and put it together and then actually hand deliver it. And like four hours later you could have seen four clients, you know?
Speaker 2:
11:33
Yeah. And you got to balance this, this vase with flowers in it, in your car as you're making turns and you got water spilling all over the place. It's a nightmare. So you're like, how much do I really like that person? I guess we're just gonna skip the flowers. I'll get, I'll get him a card. Right.
Speaker 3:
11:49
And, um, and then on the other hand, when, um, flowers in the grocery store is one disruptor in the floral industry. The other one was the internet really before in the night, eighties and nineties. This, um, the model of floristry and Floris businesses that most of us think about today is, um, you know, you've got the corner store. It's all these gifts and plants and flowers and people coming and going. And, and that model worked before the internet and before flowers and the grocery store. And it works in a few places, um, today. Um, but not, not for every florists. Like it used to work for every florist. All you had to be was far enough away from another florist to have a yellow page ad and a good sign. Right. And then a wire service because you couldn't look up florists in New York if you wanted to send something to New York or whatever.
Speaker 3:
12:42
So, um, but then the internet came and there's all these online retailers that actually don't touch flowers. People don't realize that the big national companies that you think of, you know, pro flowers, 800 flowers, et cetera, those companies don't touch flowers at all. All they do is put up a website, gather the order, and then they asked florists like us who are hands on to fill them. Really? Yeah. And the margins are bad. And um, now people are, people are getting smarter when they want to order out of state. Instead of going to a major retailer like that, they'll call, um, you know, the Google themselves and find, they'll find us or other local florists. Um, but those big companies spend a lot of money on the internet and find what people that could be our clients. Yeah. So it's like, okay, um, where's our place and where's our, where's our, um, reason for being, being, you know, we're not just going to be a backend for those online retailers.
Speaker 2:
13:46
Yeah. They're basically lead generation marketing companies that will, will aggregate their resources across the country and then a siphon all the air out of the room so that they can take all the marketing, the advertising space, and then to kind of drown out the other florists, but then still interesting way to put it. Yeah. Right. But then still you use the, the smaller floors to fulfill the actual orders. Right. They're, they, they're not worried about a supply chain or anything like that. They just say, Hey, it's not our problem. You guys fulfill the order. Right. Yeah. Interesting.
Speaker 3:
14:17
Yeah. And um, and yeah, and very, um, challenging margins. They, they charge a lot for generating those.
Speaker 2:
14:28
It's expensive. Yeah. It's expensive. Well, it's expensive to generate that. Yeah. And it's, it's interesting because it's almost like by fulfilling the orders, you, the small floors are contributing to their own demise in a way. Yeah. Right? Yeah. Because they're there. It's just like, you know, just like Uber where any one of those companies that say, all right, we're going to get all these drivers in. We're going to have all the drive soon, as soon as it's technologically feasible, drivers are going to be gone. And then vendors, they're just going to automate the vehicles, right? So let's take the companies hiring certain people to fulfill a role while they need it, but as soon as the floral, the big chains can vertically integrate and can control the whole thing, they may go ahead and do that and then cut the florists out.
Speaker 3:
15:12
Right, right. Yeah. And the thing that, um, happened with that internet marketing is that, um, in order, there was a real push towards standardized floral design. And that's why when you look at the big retailers you see around mound of flowers, whether it's in a vase or a low square, it's all the same shape, right? It's different colors, different flowers. But it's pretty much the same arrangement. Right. So, um, because they had to depend on, they didn't know if the florists would have the skill to do something more artistic or whatever. So, um, yeah, so about 2010, 11, I really started thinking about, okay, what, what is the place for our business? And, um, and a lot of it was the artistry and the design that they can't get online, you know, being something that they're not, and that fit my personality better anyway. And a lot of it was the, the um, search for who, who am I and who is our company, who are we as a team going to, how are we going to show up in the world and got some very good affirmation since 2012, we've been doing the flowers for channel three's your life a to Z. Cool.
Speaker 3:
16:38
And one week I did a really cool design for a blogger at, um, who was, uh, what was it? Oh, it was how to host a beer tasting st Patrick's day party. And they did the photo photography at the farm itself mountain. Cool. And so I thought, okay, that's a farm. I've been there. It's really cool. Can I do a floral design that's really super cool and fits the space. So we had Rosemary and artichokes and asparagus and garlic and onions, you know, green and white for the season, et cetera. And then I decided, you know, a couple of days from now we're delivering to your life a to Z. I'm just gonna do the same thing for that. You know, who says production design has to be boring. You can do a cool design, but do like 10 of them. Sure. You know? And so that was an aha moment.
Speaker 3:
17:30
And then so I did that, delivered it to your life, a to Z. unbeknownst to me that week there was an Italian chef, chef gave birth to Chini who was on the show. Two months later he reached out to me and I said, so how did you find me? And he said, you know, I was on, can you remember that, um, asparagus you did for your life, a toZ ? And I said, yeah. And he said, I saw that and I, so this week when I needed a florist, I thought about that and I called them and said, who's your florist? I gotta know who that is. And so he and I have worked on and off, um, ever since then and doing some high end luxury events. And um, but it was just so affirming to say, okay, if you do what you love, yeah.
Speaker 3:
18:11
And it's different enough from what other people are doing, people that love what you do will come to you. And so that was really my journey of kicking off the traditional designs off my website and, and, um, and then really exploring a couple of, fast forward to a couple of years ago, what is different about how we interact with our clients than other florists and higher level of care. Really going the extra mile and communicating, managing expectations. You know, you've probably experienced or heard people talk about, Oh, I ordered this online and when it got there, it didn't look anything like what I ordered. It never does. Yeah. Well. And part of the reason for that is a small local florist cannot carry 5,000 kinds of flowers every single day because it's perishable. You can't put it on the shelf and pull it out in a couple of months, you know? So we carry a rotating stock, we curate that stock, you know, the different flowers.
Speaker 3:
19:08
And so our policy is always, if we can't do something that looks pretty darn close, then we're going to get on the phone and we're going to communicate with the person and say, you know, you ordered this on our website and we could do the same design, different flowers or we can do this, you know, similar colors, you know, but give them a couple options. Right. And people have always said, Oh my gosh, that was so awesome. Because now I know what to expect. And then we offer to send pictures of what we create so they can actually see the end product and not be in the dark or have to, you know, now people text, Oh you sent me this, you know, so that happens. But
Speaker 2:
19:49
yeah, it has happened and that, and that's what happened. I went through you. I ordered flowers for my mom and another girl that I was dating back when and it was one of the, one of the hangups for me personally and probably a lot of men, is I don't, I don't really care what the flowers look like. I just don't care. You know, I want it to look beautiful. I want the recipient to be impressed with it, to enjoy it and like it. And I, of course, I would never tell this to my mom or that other girl that I don't care. You know, it's all, Oh yeah, I was, yeah. Yeah, we picked that out cause I knew you'd like those or whatever. The pinks and the yellows or whatever. I genuinely don't, I have no idea. I don't know what, what looks good, what doesn't look good.
Speaker 2:
20:29
I just want it, you know, it's kind of the act. And when I spoke to you, you guided me through it meticulously. It was perfect. And this like, what's her personality like? And I started saying personality, like, okay, cool, we'll do this. That sounds perfect. Just go ahead and do it. And they loved it. Right? Yeah. And that's part of the experience that you can't get with, with one of those bigger, bigger chains. It's just, it's just not possible. It's a one 800 number. You talked to some, somebody in a call center somewhere who also doesn't care, have no idea. He just says, yeah, this one's on sale, whatever, just do it. And so it's a lot less personal.
Speaker 3:
21:04
Yup. Yup. And what I've found is that honestly, you're right, a lot of guys and, and even women are like, I don't, I don't know how to pick out the flowers. You're the professional. You do that. And um, and so what I realized is there's the commodity of the flowers, flowers as commodity flowers in a box. There's all these subscriptions, flowers in a box that come and you have to design them and whatever, um, or flowers is commodity. Pick your color of, you know, 50 colors of the same design. Um, but nobody buys flowers for the commodity. Really. They buy them because they want to make an impact in their relationship, right? They want their mom to feel loved and appreciated. They want to communicate romance. They want to communicate support and a sympathy situation. They, they want to be the hero and, and have it be easy.
Speaker 3:
22:03
And that's our really, that's our whole positioning is to make floral gift-giving easy again and highly impactful. And I've found even with a couple of our corporate clients who love what we do, and for them it's, you know, it's a little bit of work to say, okay, what's their style and personality to give us some clues. And when I let them off the hook and don't force them to act to answer that question, the impact is not always as great. And it's a beautiful design, but they don't get that. Oh my gosh. And I think that, Oh my gosh comes from seeing something of themselves reflected in it. So, whether it's a clue about their, um, how they decorate their house, what they wear, what their hobbies, our interests, you know, it could be, um, that they are really into Japanese design or you know, whatever it is.
Speaker 3:
22:57
Sometimes it's even their profession, you know, in a professional situation, you don't always know the person's personal style that well. Sure. But, um, so for some of my clients, what I'll do, especially for our members is I will go look up the recipient online, look at their LinkedIn, their website, find a clue, and then take the design and pick the design based on that so that it reflects something of them and what they're putting out in the world. And that's really, it's really fun to do that. And, um, and then sometimes God gets involved too. Like we made recently, I'm gonna do a blog post about this soon. We created a design for a funeral. And, um, I woke up the next morning. We usually make things a day ahead for variety of reasons. One, so they're ready to go out first thing in the morning so people get early a delivery.
Speaker 3:
23:54
Um, but it also gives us room for, you know, we got, we had been really busy that day and the next morning I woke up and said, something's not right with that arrangement. I just was like, God said you need to fix that. So I went in super early, I reached out to the sender and I said, um, I think we need to do something different. I'm going to send you this picture, but it doesn't feel right and I want you to tell me that, you know, just confirm that. And she sent it and she said, yeah, there's, you're right. And she was so grateful. And then we, I use the same flowers but just changed up the design, different container. And then one of the pieces of information had been lost in tra and, um, from one person to the next hadn't been written down. And it was that the person whose life was being commemorated was very spiritual, was really saw, um, death as a transformation of life.
Speaker 3:
24:50
And so, um, when I talked to her that morning, she said to you, happened to have butterflies. And I was like, I don't know if we too, but then one of my team members dug around into the cocoon of the back drawers and pulled the butterflies out of that dark cocoon. And so then we just floated some butterflies, had them suspended in the arrangement and she was so thrilled afterwards. And I'm just so grateful when God, um, helps me like that where, you know, sometimes when you're busy that intuitive piece doesn't always flow as as well, right in the moment. So working a day ahead gives us a chance to wake up in the morning, go, Oh yeah, I need to do something a little different. So that's where part of the magic comes too from [inaudible]. And sometimes it's just feeling it. And um, and then there's other things like have we, um, are delivering one tomorrow where the description was, I want it all green and I want it wild and crazy. And so we've got great vendors in the Valley that carry unusual varieties of flowers. So I have one flower that looks like a brain. It's all kind of curvy. So I'm throwing that in there. I have some crazy succulents. And, and then I did an, I did an artistic, um, uh, piece with some, uh, bamboo weaving, um, I guess for lack of a better word anyway. So, yeah. So you have to watch on our social media for a picture of that one, but we'll see how it goes over. I definitely will. So,
Speaker 2:
26:27
yeah, that's good stuff. And you know, you've speaking of that, so you have this, this program that we're a part of. I want to ask you to kind of explain that cause it's, it's something that I had never heard of before. I think it's great. And, um,
Speaker 3:
26:45
I'm excited when people do things that I'm not normally familiar with. So can you tell us about this? Yeah. So it's a floral concierge membership. And when most people hear membership, they think like at the gym you pay once a month and you, you know, and if you don't use it, you lose it. And I'm always, whenever I'm creating something, I'm always like, what don't I like about something I'm inspired by and let's fix it. So in our membership, if you don't use it, it rolls over. Right. And so we have, um, the idea behind it is to make gift giving easy. Um, I love connecting on a deeper level with our clients. And so it's a way to, um, to really get to know someone over the months and be able to then be able to Intuit or just know, okay, I've got some guys who are like text, you know, Christina needs flowers and I already know what their budget is, what her favorite flowers are, even what kind of card message he likes to write. And that might be, and I have his credit card on file. So, um, you know, worries. We're using his membership credit. Me folks.
Speaker 3:
27:53
Yeah. I don't think there's, I haven't heard of it, Christina. So anyway, um, the idea is that once we get to know our clients, it becomes super easy for people to order flowers and know that we're going to take care of it and take care of them, make them the hero. And so with, um, with our business clients, it's a lot about I really want to show appreciation to my top tier clients and, um, I don't always have the time to go find that perfect gift. Yeah. And, um, so one of the things that's coming with our membership is also gathering some other gifting resources that when you want to do something in addition to flowers or instead of flowers that will have some resources for that for our members as well. Um, and that can be, you know, some business owners are like, I really want to show appreciation all year round.
Speaker 3:
28:52
Um, the holiday things are great, but sometimes they get lost in the shuffle. So, you know, remind me at the beginning of the month and I will tell you the five or 10 clients I want you to think this month or, you know, one or two or whatever, or a referral source. You know, referral partners are a great one. You know, and what we're finding is that our clients that are doing this on a regular basis, their engagement with their clients and their referral partners is increasing. So really our goal is to help increase the bottom line for our businesses who are members. And um, and then you have those, it really, the motivation is again, that it's a, it's like a psychographic of, I really care about relationships in my business, right? My team members, my clients, my referral partners. And I want to that appreciation. I want to reach out, I want to have a resource.
Speaker 3:
29:44
So when something comes up and I hear, Oh my gosh, my best referral partners, dad just passed away easy, quick, it's not half an hour agonizing over, I don't know, should I send it to the funeral, to the home, whatever. We're just that professional resource for our clients. And then, um, we also have members who really want to create, it's their business is about creating an experience for people when they're in their office or workspace, studio, spa, whatever. And so having beautiful flowers that are inspirational and intriguing, interesting. Maybe have some fragrance, if that's a goal of theirs. Um, having those just show up every week and maybe having to change the water if even that and just have it be, um, not time consuming. And, um, we've had clients who were doing their own flowers at their lobby or their reception desk who saved three or four hours of their time by turning it over to us. So, right.
Speaker 2:
30:45
And it's done by a professional, like you said, it's not to DIY
Speaker 3:
30:49
stuff, right? So we always have really cool design elements and design. We're always experimenting with different, um, artistic design principles in our work as well. And, um, you know, so for example, businesses that, um, there's one of my clients who actually has a sensory advocate on their team who is in charge of how does it smell? How's the music, what kind of music, what kind of day, how are the fresh flowers, you know, what are the plants doing things just, yeah, it's a brand, um, AC hotel who just, they really care about the experience of their clients in their space. And they said that their, um, when they put the sensory advocate in place and started paying attention to these matte, these areas that their, um, uh, approval rating went up by like 30 points. Yeah. From like a 60 to a 90. Just making that change.
Speaker 2:
31:50
I believe it. Yeah. Yeah. I think there's a lot that goes into that, that we don't think about. You know, when you come in and out of your office every day you say, yeah, it looks good enough for me or it smells fine or whatever. But when you add those little touches, P people really respond to that. Even if it's on a subconscious level, they may not, they may not go in and look at your bouquet or something, but they just kind of feel that energy, that life. It kind of gives some life to the environment. Yeah. Yeah.
Speaker 3:
32:15
And then the other thing that it does is the quality of the design speaks to the quality of your brand, whether it's a gift or it's in your workspace. And, um, another client of ours shared how a couple of Christmases ago she did a DIY Christmas gift thing and she said when she got back home from delivering them, she just, her style, she just had this pit in her stomach because she was like, I'm not a crafty person and those were crappy and I don't ever want to do that again. You know? And she said, I'm sure my clients were like, yeah, the thought was nice and then, you know, but, but if you have a brand that is really all about quality, then just like Scott habits talks about your brand, your visual branding is your business, right? That it flows to your gifts.
Speaker 3:
33:07
And if you send something that's not designed well or that it just doesn't fit with the quality of your business, it's, it's just, and again, it might not be conscious. It's a subconscious. Huh. I don't know. That didn't, I didn't really feel like them. I, you know, or if you walk into a space and like if you walked into a Ritz Carlton, um, you know, and they had, um, little Carnation or Daisy bouquets or whatever is something that's, it's like a, that's a disconnect. You know, you got to have something, right. Cheaper flour. Yeah. And many people, I mean, some people are Carnation snobs on the positive side where there's some really cool colors that have come out, but other people, especially over the last 20, 30 years, carnations have like big com passe and
Speaker 2:
33:57
yeah. See that's why I need your expertise cause I would have no idea. Right. Like all these, these are these nice flowers and I would have no idea that they're even carnations or what that means.
Speaker 3:
34:05
Yeah, yeah, yeah. And so, yeah. So it's our job to stay up on those trends and find out what's new. And um, and then also think about things like for our members, we'll think about, um, you know, they may say, okay, I want to send something to the hospital and they can trust us that we're not going to send a super highly fragrant flower into a hot, into a small closed warm hospital room that's going to then just get set out in the hall and you know, then what it might help the nurses, which, you know, that's OK. But um, you know, so we, we think about those things, you know, we're other people our clients don't have to think of.
Speaker 2:
34:47
Yeah. And one of the features that I love of your membership program is that, like you said, it carries over, but it keeps it top of mind for us at least to think about gratitude and appreciation. Because when we get so busy with all of the other stuff, somebody sends us a referral or a client and we just, Hey, you know, Hey, thanks. Send them a text or something. And then there's no real mechanism. You know, it's kind of a pain in the butt to go do something, buy a bottle of booze and ship it or something like that. It's just kind of a lot of a lot of different projects put together in order to show that appreciation. But with your program, like you said, you just reach out, say Hey, this person needs that. Give them some brief information. It's done. Just forget about it. Yep. Get some information once it's been delivered
Speaker 3:
35:29
ex. Absolutely. Absolutely. Yeah. And we do have a partnership with a beer and wine store, um, bottle shop 48 in Tempe that if people do want to send, um, they don't have hard liquor. So we're still working on that aspect. But um, we, for our members, we have that aspect too where they can add something on or have that included.
Speaker 2:
35:51
Yeah. Yeah. I would like to send liquor attorneys like their liquor. Yeah, I have heard that. They like it. That's what they want. They don't want the, you know, the 5% beer they want give me the good 40% stuff. Go. Okay. I'll work on that for you. Right. I appreciate it. We'll find that connection. Yeah. The other thing I wanted to ask at talk to you about is, you know, you're yes, you're a florist, you're a business owner. Um, but you're an entrepreneur. You know, you're somebody who is kinda like me. I didn't go to business school. I don't have my MBA. You know, like a lot of what we've built here, you kind of learn as you go through it. How, how are you managing that? How do you, you know, kind of, uh, keep yourself educated and learn? Cause there's a lot that goes into running a business, especially, especially when like yours, you've got, you've got perishable goods, you gotta, you gotta know how much to buy to come in to resell to get it out. So you don't, you know, you've got waste, you've got inventory, you've got a lot of different moving parts and it's a lot to juggle. I mean, on top of running the actual business, right? So you're wearing all these different hats as an entrepreneur, how, how, how do you go about that? How do are you have coaching? Do you have books that you read? What's your system for, for building your business?
Speaker 3:
37:05
Yeah, so it's been different, different years. Um, currently I'm working with a coach that, um, in 2010 to 2012, I was in a kind of a hands on MBA style program. Um, and she was the coordinator and main mentor in that. So it was great. And I um, reconnected with her actually through BNI. She's in a different chapter and so I'm doing some coaching with her and I was just so helpful recently to sit down and look at what are some really both doable goals, but then the big hairy audacious, Holy crap, how is that going to happen? Goal to stretch for, um, was so good. And um, it's just amazing how when you open your mind and you set those goals, then you start thinking about, okay, how is it possible? Um, so that I do a lot of reading. I listened to a lot of either YouTube videos or podcasts. Um, I, I really appreciate the continuing education expectation in BNI that, um, helps as well. And then with floral education, usually at least a couple times a year I go to some kind of class or event or I get emails about design trends, things like that as well.
Speaker 2:
38:24
Yeah. Well you're very good at it. I mean, you know, I, I work with a lot of small businesses and, and, and other entrepreneurs. Your email marketing's on point, you know, I know you're, I get these emails from you and, uh, just kind of how you structured everything is, it seems like it's, you know, you're building a lot of systems in place that are going to facilitate your continued growth but not at the expense of the service that you're delivering. Right,
Speaker 3:
38:48
right. Yeah. And um, yeah, and sometimes when you're wearing too many hats, things have to give. And so the last few weeks I've been hiring some new team members and um, one of the team member transitions was in the designer role, who I've usually leaned on my designer to help with the flower ordering. So I've had to take that back on my plate. So I haven't done as much with email marketing the last month. And there's part of me that's like the pressure's building for that, but I had to take care of our current clients, you know, so I had, you know, I have to keep reminding myself it's okay. Yeah, we gotta take care of these clients, then it'll come. And, and then I'm always re thinking, you know, um, actually a good conversation with God have us yesterday he said, you know, if you aren't bored out of your mind with your marketing message, you're innovating way too frequently. And I went, Oh, okay. Well good news is I'm a little bit bored, but I'm not bored out of my mind, so don't innovate too much yet.
Speaker 2:
39:55
Yeah. That's good advice. Yeah. I mean it's kind of, you have to, you have to tell people what's that? What's that saying? You have to tell people what they know and then you have to tell them what they don't know and you have to tell them again. You gotta to tell them again. Something like that. Yeah. Yeah. You just gotta keep, just kinda beating it into their heads because people don't, people don't recognize the value a lot of the time. I mean, I, I, I clearly did. I just said, yeah, this is a, this is a program that is going to encourage me to give more, to, to appreciate more, to show my gratitude more often. I hate thinking about it. And so it made, it made perfect sense for me, but from, for some other people, they're real slow. They're not QuickStarts. Right, right.
Speaker 2:
40:31
I'm a quick start, boom, boom, I'm done. Got it done. Next project. I love clients like that. Yeah. But some people aren't, you know, and you really kind of have to go in there and sell the value, but um, you know, what you're doing is, is, is great. Um, what, what our, so, okay, so say people have been listening to the podcast and you know, they want to know if they should be working with you. What are some of your kind of ideal clients, people that you can deliver the most value to? Is it, you know, guys like me who don't know what the hell they're doing or who else is it?
Speaker 3:
41:01
Yeah. So, um, yeah, people that want it, it's really again about the psychographic graphic of people that want the impact and are willing to invest in their relationships. Um, and to see flowers as an investment in the relationship that it's, that when we create for you an emotional experience that the memory of that experience lasts for months and even years. Yeah. And it has payoff for a long time and then builds on each other when you give the same person a gift, you know, whether it's a personal relationship, et cetera. So ideal clients there in a few categories. One is, um, businesses that have a lot of people coming and going and really care about how people feel in their space is one. Um, the other is business development professionals, account managers, business owners who are where longterm client and referral partner relationships are critical to the survival of their business and the growth of their business.
Speaker 3:
42:04
Um, those are ideal connections and who really see the value of how gifts further that appreciation and deepen the relationship. Um, and then, um, we have, uh, I had a surprise actually, I've been mostly focused on the business clients, but then I've had some, uh, some people who are like, um, and mostly women so far. Well actually I have a few men too who say, you know, we just want flowers in our home a couple of times a month. Can you do that? And so it's kind of the, I'm going to treat myself, I'm going to take care of myself, I'm going to nurture myself. And that's a growing trend in our culture too. So it makes sense. Um, and then the third is, um, keeping the romance alive and for people in remote romantic relationships, men or women who, um, who want to surprise and delight.
Speaker 3:
43:04
And we have a romance package coming out with our new website where people can sign up at a month with a monthly retainer and then pick the six or eight times a year that they want flowers, birthday, anniversary. If they want Valentine's mother's day. Or just set it and forget it and just set it and forget it. And the next thing they know, they get a call going, Oh my gosh, this is amazing. Yeah, that sounds perfect. Yeah. So those are some of the dynamics and we, um, and also businesses that in back to the businesses who have a lot of people, um, ones that are, have showrooms and where it's important then when people come in that they're, they feel good and have a positive experience so that they want to buy whatever it is that they're showing, whether it's a remodeler with kitchen cabinetry or, um, you know, any kind of sales situation, flowers can, can kind of butter them up, warm them up.
Speaker 3:
44:04
Yeah. Yeah, I totally agree with that. What is, what is the etiquette for, with men giving other men flowers? Good questions. So I think, um, I think there's a couple of things in play. One is no baby's breath, nothing girly, nothing feminine. And that would, that might be true. That's true too. If a woman gives a man flowers first, it's about the recipient, you know, and who they are now from a man giving to a man. The other thing could be, I'm really tying into if you know that they love golf, well let's go get some golf tees, golf balls, you know, play with the golf theme and kind of appreciate it. Give them something to go, Oh, this is really cool and you know, something they can show off. On the other hand, um, one of the, um, kind of inside secrets I'll share here that um, these kinds of things I typically save for members, but because you're a member and we're doing the show, I'll share it, is I've also had, um, clients who have sent the flowers to the man with the card from them with another blank card so that they can turn around and give it to their wife or significant other so they can make them the hero.
Speaker 3:
45:19
So it's like a twice gift. Wow. Yeah. So, and then I've had other people say the men need to buy their own flowers again. I don't have to tell their wives about it. Right, right. So anyway,
Speaker 2:
45:31
it's like a pre, it's a re gift.
Speaker 3:
45:33
Yeah. It's a, it's a free gift free gift or something like that. I love it. And then I've also had people experimenting with um, gift cards and saying, you know, I'm going to give you the gift of being able to give flowers or to get them for yourself or you know, family member, whatever. So, so we have done that as well. And um, and actually that reminds rabbit trail thought. Um, another client of ours that's another type of client of ours is one who does a lot of networking and especially at events where they are, um, like for example, an insurance agent at a chamber event where they do door prizes and they want to give something away because they want it to be heard about in the whole room. And sometimes, um, like the classic gift cards that everybody gives don't give you that attention. People just don't even pay attention. And so what we'll do is create a branded arrangement that is in the color palette of their logo and you know, something cool or it could be a seasonal design, but something really cool so that when it's given away, everybody says, Oh my gosh, who gave that? Yeah. And so it gives them, really gives them a tension in the whole room. So companies that don't have a tangible product that they could give away and get that kind of attention, we can provide that, um, in a networking context. So
Speaker 2:
46:56
yeah, it's a great experience. And the one point I want to bring up is the cost. So your pricing is very, very reasonable. Oh, thank you. Yeah, I think it's very reasonable. And so I think that may be something that for a lot of people that kind of dissuades them from potentially exploring those options. Cause a lot of people, the only interaction that they have with flowers is like around the holidays, right? When they go to the one of those stores or they go to the grocery store and it doesn't, Rose's is 60 bucks or whatever it is, whatever the, whatever the costs are, you know, it's all astronomically inflated because they can do it and everybody's to get flowers and so they think that that is what it's gonna cost on a Tuesday afternoon in July when there's no, nobody cares, no high demand.
Speaker 2:
47:39
The demand demands down so, so I just kind of want to put that out there. You know that, that the price is very affordable. It's very reasonable. It's something that you can get a ton of value in also because you're not what you're delivering when people order from you is more product. It's more design, it's more art, it's more flowers, it's more the experience of it, it's more experience, it's the whole, it's a whole, there's a lot more value in that because you can take more of those people's money and actually invest it into the things that matter versus the bigger box chain online companies where that money is actually being pay is actually paying for the marketing, paying for the operations in the call centers and the boxes and all that stuff. So basically you're, you're getting, your dollar is going a lot further on with the, with the local Flores, somebody like you who does this full time and you're not paying for the overhead of all of the ads that they have to spend and all that, the website, you know, all of the SEO and all that stuff. So I, you know, I would really encourage people to, to consider it because it's a, it's, it's brilliant, it's great and it's, uh, it's very easy to do when you make the experience fun. Actually, I enjoy it. So let's, let's connect people with you. So where are some good places for them to, to find you, follow you, connect with you, order flowers from you, sign up for your program.
Speaker 3:
49:02
Yup. So God's garden treasures.com is our website and we are waiting with bated breath for a new website. And I'm not sure when this podcast is publishing so it might be published, but w if you, um, when you go to our website, you can sign up for our emails at the top of the page and then you'll get the, as soon as it's available you'll get that notice. And in the meantime, we obviously like yourself have people that have signed up and I'm happy to have a quick phone call and I basically have boiled it down to asking three questions to know to recommend a membership that's gonna work for you and feel really awesome and um, give you the, the results that you want.
Speaker 2:
49:42
Yeah. Yeah. Real simple. So God's garden treasures.com you're also on Instagram at God's garden treasures. Yeah. Do you have a phone number?
Speaker 3:
49:52
Yup. (480) 603-7673. And we are on Facebook as well. Same God's garden treasures, um, for that as well.
Speaker 2:
50:01
Yeah, absolutely. Give more flowers people, yes. Contact car and car in Crawford. God's beautiful and fragrant to make it beautiful and fragrant. Caryn, thank you so much for coming on the show. Thank you. Until next time,
Speaker 1:
50:16
the ruler nation podcast is brought to you by the R and R law group. Arizona's premier criminal defense and personal injury. The law firm available@wwwdotourourlawaz.com or give us a call, (480) 400-1355.
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